Nikon’s New Feature: Automatic Autofocus Lens Calibration

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in canon, Fashion, Featured, landscape, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait

Nikon’s New Feature: Automatic Autofocus Lens Calibration

If we looked at the long list of annoyances in photography (and it is long), few would contest that sitting right near the top would be autofocus problems. There is nothing quite like special kind of fury felt when coming back from a shoot and loading up those image on a big screen only to find the majority are just enough out of focus to be unusable. Of course, this happens more frequently for some types of shooters than others; Landscape photographers shooting at infinity likely won’t have the problem quite to the same extent as a portrait or wedding photographer shooting at f/2 or shallower, but the problem is malignant. It’s one of the reasons we sing the praise of tethering and urge you to do it as much as possible, and why we care so much about being able to program buttons for single-press 100% zoom – so we can quickly analyze in-field when without a tether station. However, even when tethering and checking focus, that just tells you if you’re off; showing the symptoms rather than administering the cure. At least, however, the diagnoses is generally straightforward – your autofocus needs tuning. Just like any piece of machinery cameras and lenses go wrong sometimes and need calibration, and the problem is that most photographers don’t ever address autofocus calibration. In fact, the problem is of pandemic proportions. It’s somewhat understandable because it’s a bit of a geeky thing, and the traditional ways to calibrate are geeky endeavors, even if easy and inexpensive. You can buy a simple and straight-forward calibration tool (and should), and most cameras have menu options that allow you to do the fine tuning with these kits in no time. Lens Calibration tool example. Get this one as used by our Jay Cassario here. To be fair, these systems aren’t perfect, and many of these systems allow for AF fine tuning to only affect a single focal length and distance, but in my experience, it tends to be worth it. That said, Sigma – surprise, surprise – is doing it well and better with their dock. But Nikon is stepping up to the plate with their new Auto Autofocus calibration system to be found on their D5 and D500 cameras. The new cameras will be the first to offer the option, but there is hope that Nikon will be able to usher in the feature to other camera models via a firmware update. Essentially the Auto AF fine tuning just cuts out a few steps of the tuning process, but it still requires you to set some ‘controls’ when using it. Nonetheless, the controls required aren’t much, and you can do it in the field, on the fly. Now, mirrorless cameras are generally less symptomatic of these AF problems due to how they focus – right off the sensor, so it sort of...

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Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Food, Photography Tips, portrait

Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography

In my career as a photographer I’ve covered many genres from studio product photography, editorial, industrial, food photography, weddings, portraits, fine art, and travel – but through all of that, I’m primarily a people photographer. I like to photograph people. Shoe repair man in Nicaragua – By Darlene Hildebrandt Model at sunset – By Darlene Hildebrandt Cuban beauties – By Darlene Hildebrandt Whether it’s in a studio environment doing a posed portrait, a candid doing street photography, a shop owner or vendor in a foreign country – people are always interesting and challenging to photograph. Weekly Photography Challenge – People We’ve got lots of articles to help you as you go about photographing people this week in fact it’s our feature topic right now. You can see all the ones we’ve done so far this week below, and watch for more people photography articles over the next few days: How to Take Low Key Head-shots How to Do a One Light Portrait Setup and Use it as Your Back-up Plan Travel People Photography – Tips and Pitfalls 8 Tips for Photographing Men 24 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography Nicaraguan school kids – By Darlene Hildebrandt Wedding fun – By Darlene Hildebrandt Cuban dancers – By Darlene Hildebrandt You can also check out our ebooks on people and portrait photography: Fast Flash for Portrait Perfection Portraits: Lighting the Shot Portraits: Making the Shot Portraits: Striking the Pose Kids Photography So if you are not inclined to photograph people and this challenges makes you a bit nervous – maybe now is the time to get out of your comfort zone and just do it. I promise they won’t bite! Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. You can see some of mine here on this page – now it’s your turn to share, and show me your people photos. The post Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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Should I Get Videographer For My Wedding? Brides.com Says Just DIY It

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Featured, Photography Tips

Should I Get Videographer For My Wedding? Brides.com Says Just DIY It

It’s one of the biggest days in a girl’s life, one that most dream about for years – from the first time they see Prince Charming lead Cinderella in her wedding dress from the castle while the words, “…and they lived happily ever after…” scroll up on the screen. It is estimated that in the U.S. the average couple spends $26,000 on the wedding day. The day goes by so fast and then, it’s gone. All that is left are some extra party favors; the top of the cake that will be pretty stale in a year no matter how tightly you wrap it; your wedding photos, and if you hired a videographer, a wedding video. In a recent article on Brides.com, “5 Unique Alternatives to the Traditional Wedding Videographer,” the author gives some recommendations if a bride doesn’t want or cannot afford to hire a wedding videographer. Among the suggestions are to give GoPro’s to some trusted people (or the dog); invite people to record and post it on Instagram; or use an app to stitch together the photos and snippets from the day to make your own DIY wedding video/slideshow. [REWIND: DO YOU NEED TO FEED YOUR WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER? BRIDES.COM SAYS NO.] Though these are good ideas, there really is nothing like hiring a professional to record what is arguably one of the most important days of your life. While it’s understandable that Brides.com wants to give brides budget-friendly options in lieu of a videographer, the wish would be for these types of publications to spend more time educating their brides about why hiring professionals to document a wedding day is important. Earlier this year, Earlier this year, Vogue Magazine suggested that modern brides should say, “I Don’t” to a professional wedding photographer, and put disposable cameras on the tables instead. (Sure, if you want brides to have out-of-focus drunken selfies of all of their friends). Now, don’t get me wrong, we all love a DIY project, but there are some things that just shouldn’t be do-it-yourself. Root canals, for example. Those should be done by a professional endodontist. Open heart surgery should be the work of a certified heart surgeon with a medical license. Though I’m clearly pointing out some extreme examples that are by no means equivalent, leaving a wedding day to be documented by people who are barely capable of using their iPhones to take a photo or video borders on terrible advice. Of course, there may be brides and grooms who could care less about remembering their wedding day with any physical documentation, but a majority of them prefer to have beautiful, professional images and footage on a day where they are surrounded by those that love them; a day where they spent a considerable amount of time planning and dreaming about. Of course, there may be brides and grooms who could care...

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28 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait

28 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography

People have a diverse range of emotions, styles, and looks and capturing that with a camera is the photographer’s job. From posed studio portraits, to street photography or candid shots, getting the character and essence of a person in an image is the goal. Let’s see how these photographers did with people photography: By United Nations Photo By Darlene Hildebrandt By Jim O’Connell By Darlene Hildebrandt By Shahab By Tyrone Daryl By Fouquier ? By Sebastian Rieger By Khánh Hmoong By Christopher Michel By astrid westvang By David Stanley By Eric Montfort By Chryssa Kotsanidou By T W I N K A By enki22 By Tilman Haerdle By Elena Penkova By Monique Prater By Ivan Constantin By Michael Salvato By Kannan Muthuraman By Hernán Piñera By Meena Kadri By Rod Waddington By Rod Waddington By Meena Kadri By Umberto De Peppo Cocco People photography week This week on dPS we’re featuring articles all about different kinds of people photography including portrait, event and travel photography. See all the previous ones below, and watch for more people photography articles over the next few days. How to Take Low Key Head-shots How to Do a One Light Portrait Setup and Use it as Your Back-up Plan Travel People Photography – Tips and Pitfalls 8 Tips for Photographing Men The post 28 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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Five Perfect Posing Tips For Boudoir Photography

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016 in boudoir, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait

Five Perfect Posing Tips For Boudoir Photography

If you were looking for something sexy, you came to the right place. Don’t worry, this article is totally SFW (safe for workplace), but I am not promising it won’t tease you. Learning the subtle variations in hand gestures, looks, and body placement will diversify your portfolio and give you a better understanding of the nuances of posing. In general, one of the biggest mistakes photographers make is moving from scene to scene too quickly, without making adjustments to the posing of their subjects. The five different posing ideas presented here will help you pay attention to small details that make a huge difference. Conceal, Don’t Feel The most important thing we as photographers can take from Disney’s Frozen was the lesson, “Conceal, don’t feel.” After all, Elsa knows best. Odds are, if a hand’s placement doesn’t look natural, it will draw attention to the fact that the subject is concealing something (refer to the image above of our Dearest Pye). Place the subjects’ arms in a way to make it seem as though it wasn’t their intention to conceal. By doing so, you leave more to the viewer’s imagination and create thought-provoking imagery. Watch How the Hands Are Placed Since we are on the subject of hand placement, pay close attention to how your subject places their fingers on their body. You want to avoid stiff and tense “Barbie Hands” and you can do this by requesting that your subject shake out the tension in their fingers and softly place their hands on their body. It’s also good to note that bending at the wrist releases tension and eases the fingers to lay naturally. Once this has been addressed, place the hands where they would naturally be if the subject was to conceal their private parts and avoid mirroring arm placements at all costs. Relax The Lips Closing and pressing the lips together can have the effect of creating tension in the jaw line, and typically this isn’t what we’re going for. Instead, try having your subject open their lips, ever so subtly, to release tension and go for a softer look. Making this slight adjustment completely transforms the feel of a portrait, and the look of the subject. [REWIND: Boudoir Photography Tip | Breaking the Ice] Direct Where the Eyes Go If your subject desires a sexy, confident overall feel to the images, direct them to have their chin up and eyes looking down at the camera. This showcases a more domineering and powerful gaze. If it’s an innocent and ‘longing’ look that’s sought, direct their chin down and have them look up towards the camera. It’s good to note there that direct eye contact with the camera is the perfect posing idea for shots where you are peeking in on a scene (behind a door, through a curtain, etc), however for a voyeuristic image, have the...

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