Portraiture

Portraiture photography captures images; mostly of humans to emphasize the mood and facial expression of the subject. Came out of portrait painting, portraiture photography can be done anytime, anywhere and is a subject of high demand these days. Portraiture photography is focused on images of people above their neck to bring out the facial expression in their eyes. However, at times the whole body or even the background can be included. Most of professional photographers use portraiture photography in black and white which further adds gleam to the images captured. It is one of the oldest genre of photography as well.

Nikon Full Frame Cameras At Discounts Up to $700, & More Savings From Canon & Sigma (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 10, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Nikon Full Frame Cameras At Discounts Up to $700, & More Savings From Canon & Sigma (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: NikoN D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in a robust body, competitively priced, it’s now an industry staple for many. You can see our full review here, and right now you can score one for $500 off dropping the price from $3,296 to $2,796. It’s the largest savings we’ve seen on the D810 to-date. Get it here. D750 This is the jackknife DSLR at the moment and the one I found almost no fault in when reviewing it (full review here). With its 24MP sensor, low light capability, extended exposure comp, speed, and video capability it made you stop to wonder if you really needed a D810, and if you didn’t need the extra resolution, this was your answer. Typically $2,296, it’s currently going for $1,996 for a $300 break in price. Get it here. D5300 The Nikon D5000 sparked a bit of a small revolution because the series was so small, and so capable, and adopted much from its much larger more expensive brothers. The D5300 is a highly capable camera, and the series is one we refer to in our Photography 101 workshops because they are so good, and for so little. With 39 AF points, 24MP CMOS sensor, built in wi-fi and GPS, no optical low pass filter, and 1080p video at 60fps, it’s impressive. Typically listed at $1,096, it can be had right now for only $796, shaving $300 off the list. Get it here. Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved the world over. It can be found along the sidelines at major sporting events, weddings,...

Read More »

Nikon D810 For $500 Off, D750 Is $300 Off, 25% Off CreativeLive, & More (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 7, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Nikon D810 For $500 Off, D750 Is $300 Off, 25% Off CreativeLive, & More (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading these words you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them CreativeLive CreativeLive is, for the one or two of you who don’t know, a massive online education powerhouse that broadcasts live classes from leaders in their respective fields all around the world. Those classes span the gamut of the photographic field and cover varying degrees of education for photographers of all levels. Associated with CL are names like Chase Jarvis, Sue Bryce, Zack Arias, and our own Pye Jirsa. SLR Lounge is proud to partner with CreativeLive and offer a new customer promotion offer. Using the code CLNEW20, all new customers will be able to get 20% off your order! There’s never been a better time to tap into what CreativeLive’s got in store, but hurry as the offer for 20% off New Customer Orders expires on April 8th. Gear Deals It’s one of those times where there are huge savings to be had on some of the best and most sought after gear on the market, like the Nikon D810, D750, and a host of other cameras and lenses. Here are some of the very best with the biggest savings. *Keep in mind the deals presented may have varying dates of expiry. NIKON D810 The D810 can surely be called one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in a robust body, competitively priced, it’s now an industry staple for many. You can see our full review here, and right now you can score one for $500 off dropping the price from $3,296 to $2,796. It’s the largest savings we’ve seen on the D810 to-date. Get it here. NIKON D750 This is the jackknife DSLR at the moment and the one I found almost no fault in when reviewing it (full review here). With its 24MP sensor, low light capability, extended exposure comp, speed, and video capability it made you stop to wonder if you really needed a D810, and if you didn’t need the extra resolution, this was your answer. Typically $2,296, it’s currently going for $1,996 for a $300 break in price. Get it here. CANON 50MM F/1.2 Certainly one of the more famous of the Canon lenses, the 50mm f/1.2L gained even more notoriety in the past 2 years as being the go-to lens of wildly successful Humans Of New York photographer...

Read More »

5 Tips for Using Risk Taking as a Tool for Better Photography

Posted by on Apr 3, 2016 in Fashion, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

5 Tips for Using Risk Taking as a Tool for Better Photography

With the rising tide of enthusiast photographers and the ubiquitous camera phone, there is more competition for eyeballs than ever before in the photo industry. How can you ever stand out from the crowd to be noticed? The trick is both deceptively simple and incredibly complicated: take more risks. Great photographers rarely play it safe, but before you head into the world with reckless abandon, let’s dive into what kinds of risk taking is productive. 1 – Your camera is a tool, not a pet You’ve received your very first, very shiny, very expensive DSLR kit. Your instincts are to cradle and protect the expensive piece of equipment. Don’t. While you shouldn’t fully submerge your camera, or throw it off the balcony and expect good results, coddling it like your newborn child won’t do you any good either. It’s a tool and is meant to be used out in the world. It should get a few scratches in the paint and some wear and tear on the grip. Take a look at the following images and ask yourself where the camera is. For the first two, the camera is sitting on the bow of a kayak roughly four inches above the water. For the third image, the camera is a half inch off the muddy ground. Water is often a camera’s worst enemy, but without the risk of the camera getting wet, these images would not be possible. Water is not your camera’s only enemy though. Dings and scrapes, dust, and even wild animals pose a threat. That said, there are ways to be smart about risk taking and mitigating potential problems. For example, when kayaking you could store the equipment in a dry bag, so it is only exposed when you stop to take a photograph. You could have a friend kayak with you and help stabilize your kayak, or warn you when a large wave is coming. (It is recommended to do outdoor activities with a buddy anyway for general safety). You can use various coverings, coatings, and cases as well to protect your gear. You don’t even have to be in the water to expose your camera to harsh elements. The spray from Wli falls in Ghana was strong enough to reach me 300 meters away. I kept a light jacket in front of my camera until the right moment. 2 – Know your tools In order to take risks in a smart fashion, it helps to know the limitations of your tools. Does your camera have dust or weather sealing? Does the lens? Did you remember to put a clear (UV) filter on the front of the lens to protect against the basic threats? Is the body primarily plastic? Does it have a metal frame? A quick visit to the manufacturer’s website or a websearch for your equipment’s user manuals should get you the information...

Read More »

Using Flash to Recreate the Sun and Enhance Bright and Airy Portraiture

Posted by on Mar 23, 2016 in canon, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Using Flash to Recreate the Sun and Enhance Bright and Airy Portraiture

If you’ve followed along in the Ordinary to Extraordinary video series, you’ll have seen how we’ve used the Profoto B1 to recreate Golden Hour. This is a continuation of that video, where we will show you how a high-powered strobe can be a beneficial tool in any photographer’s kit – even for someone that shoots primarily natural light. Using Flash to Recreate the Sun and Enhance Bright and Airy Portraiture Click to Subscribe! We recently went out on a maternity shoot around the noon hour where there was plenty of natural light. Ryan and Jackie’s mood board had an airy and pastel feel that lent itself perfectly to a natural light look. Twenty minutes into the shoot, they encountered a little issue. The sun that had been peeking through the trees had disappeared, so Pye brought out his Profoto B1 and placed it on a Benro monopod to recreate the look Ryan and Jackie were looking for. Using a speed ring (typically used for mounting accessories) as a makeshift reflector to funnel the light forward toward the subjects, he braced the monopod between two trees and aimed it toward the shooting area. Using techniques from Lighting 101 and Lighting 201, Pye made sure that, since he was shooting with a strobe, the ambient light was bright and natural to start with. With his Canon 5D Mark III on the following settings: 1/200th, ISO 50, f/1.6 and the B1 at full power, Pye was able to create the following images. Can This Look Be Achieved With Regular Flashes? Yes. You can achieve the same look with regular flashes, but at 500-watt seconds, you’ll need 8-10 flashes to get that much power, and who wants to carry around and set up all those flashes? The Profoto B1 also has an extremely fast recycle time. The powerful strobe really helps highlight Jackie’s form, adding a hair light and helping her stand out from the background. Look at the images below and you can tell the subtle differences that adding a high powered strobe can achieve. We hope you enjoyed this video, and if you want to see more, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel!        Share...

Read More »

Documentary Photography: Adding Family Photojournalism Sessions To Your Portrait Business

Posted by on Mar 22, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Documentary Photography: Adding Family Photojournalism Sessions To Your Portrait Business

Pretty portraits of families and children are a time-honored way for photographers to earn a living. But, increasingly photographers are searching for ways to allow their clients to capture what their lives are really like. This emerging genre of documentary photography or family photojournalism appeals to many clients who don’t want photos that make them look like they could be any family placed in a the middle of a field with some props. Instead, they want photos that show their unique personalities and the rhythm of their lives ranging from Sunday morning rituals, their favorite playground, to bedtime rituals. For photographers, offering Family Photojournalism sessions can be a challenge. To embrace family photojournalism, a photographer needs to be willing to let go of control over where sessions take place, the lighting, and time-tested poses. But, with some practice, offering Family Photojournalism sessions can help set you apart in your market and can help you learn how to make great photos even under the most challenging of circumstances. Kirsten Lewis is the godmother of Family Photojournalism and has presented two CreativeLive courses on the topic. Family Photography: Modern Storytelling and Family Photography: Photojournalism in the Home. Kirsten describes Family Photojournalism this way: “For me, I approach family photojournalism with the same respect for the code of ethics that a news photojournalist follows in the field. My goal is to document my families truthfully, honestly and objectively. I do not judge my subjects or their lifestyle; I simply photograph them without bias.” [REWIND: PHOTOJOURNALISM TIPS FOR GETTING THE PERFECT CANDID SHOT] Family Photojournalism is still very new, and different photographers may have different approaches. Kirsten shares her approach: Do not direct the subjects in any way. Be patient and believe that a great moment will happen on its own. Identify the clues that suggest that a great moment will happen, prepare for the moment ahead of time, and then wait for it to happen. Never direct clients or disturb the environment, this includes not moving any objects, altering light sources or opening doors or windows. Family photojournalism documents a specific family and should tell the story not just as the family as a whole but the story of their relationships with one another. It should also highlight each family member’s individuality and personality within the family dynamic. While traditional portraiture and lifestyle family photography requires the photographer to take most, if not all, of the control in regards to the moment, the environment, and the technical, family photojournalism frees the photographer of this so they can simply focus of all of their decision-making on technical choices and how they tell the story. When taking photographs, remember that it’s NOT about the activities in which the family is engaging, but rather how each member of the family interacts with one another while participating. Post processing is minimal, never adding or removing anything...

Read More »

Incorporate Headshots Into Any Photography Business: 5 Tips From New York’s Best Headshot Photographer

Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 in Featured, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Incorporate Headshots Into Any Photography Business:  5 Tips From New York’s Best Headshot Photographer

There is one thing just about everyone needs: a headshot. Once used only by actors, headshots are now something everyone needs, whether it’s for their company’s website, a dating app, Facebook, or a LinkedIn profile. Peter Hurley is one of the country’s best-known headshot photographers. He believes that, because everybody needs a good one regardless of gender, age, or profession, headshots are the biggest growing genre of portraiture. Because of this, all photographers should add headshots into what they are already doing. Anytime there is a person in front of your camera, there is an opportunity to give them a great, new headshot. Taking a good headshot doesn’t need to be complicated. Hurley, who teaches courses on CreativeLive and also for his Headshot Crew, shares his top five tips for making the best headshots possible. 1. Start With The Jawline Facial features look much better if the jawline is out to the camera. Getting the jawline out towards the camera will make an enormous difference with subjects who are carrying some extra weight, but even for subjects who are in shape, getting their jawline out towards the camera will help tone their features. Ask your subject to move their forehead towards the camera to get their jawlines where they should be. Read SMALL ADJUSTMENT, BIG IMPACT: THE SECRET TO A STRONG HEADSHOT BY PETER HURLEY for more details. 2. Find Their Good Side It’s critical to know your subject’s good side before you start shooting. Everyone has a “sweet spot” which is their best angle and as a headshot photographer, you need to be able to find it. About 90% of the time, people part their hair on their good side, so this is a good place to start when looking for the best side to put camera forward for a headshot. When people put their best side forward, it will give them confidence, and this will come through in their photographs. Sometimes you will have to convince people what their good side is since what people see in the mirror is the opposite of what comes through in a photograph. [REWIND: The Key To Capturing Your “Good” Side: Lighting 101] 3. Work the Eyes Confidence and fear both come from the eyes. It is essential that a headshot conveys confidence. To achieve a confident look, Hurley recommends the squinch. You read that right – your subject will need to squinch, not squint. In a squinch, the lower lid comes up, but the top lid does not come down. As Hurley demonstrates in this video, the squinch goes a long way towards creating confidence. The squinch is a sure-fire way to avoid the “deer in the headlights” look that wide open eyes create in headshots. 4. Mind the Mouth It’s important that a headshot makes the subject look approachable. While confidence comes from the eyes, approachability comes from the...

Read More »