How To Use Light To Separate Your Subject From The Background

Posted by on Apr 22, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How To Use Light To Separate Your Subject From The Background

Understanding the effect lighting on your subject opens up a wide range of possibilities for your photography. You can accomplish a lot with one just light, but this is a scenario where more is actually…more. With more lights, you increase your options for controlling the look of your image. A great free resource on understanding lighting is the series of videos from J.P. Morgan and folks over at the Slanted Lens. In their latest video, the breakdown how to use light to create separation; let’s take a look. 1 Light Setup With a one light setup, you create separation by lighting both your subject and the background. The single light creates nice highlights and shadows on your subject and background that contrast one another nicely. However, with only one light, you have to keep your back drop close to your subject. If you’d like to catch up on the previous videos in this series you can find it here. [REWIND:] The Relationship Between Shutter Speed & Flash Is Critical | Remember This Lighting Mantra 2 Light Setup With a two light setup you can create the same looks you did with one light. However, you are able to put distance between your subject and the background. Dedicating a light to both the background and your subject gives you the flexibility to adjust the lighting on each separately. Rim Lighting Rim lighting is a common method of adding a dynamic element to your subject. It highlights your subject’s hair and outlines of their body, making them stand out from the background. Color Adding color to your background adds depth to your image because your eyes will drawn to the natural color it sees. Of course there is nothing stopping you from using all of these techniques together and doing gives you the most options for creative images. If you’d like to catch up on the previous videos in this series you can find it here. [REWIND:] The Relationship Between Shutter Speed & Flash Is Critical | Remember This Lighting Mantra        Share...

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C-LOG Has Officially Been Announced For The 5D Mark IV, But It’ll Cost You

Posted by on Apr 22, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

C-LOG Has Officially Been Announced For The 5D Mark IV, But It’ll Cost You

The rumored Canon 5D Mark IV update to integrate C-LOG video capture is finally here, but it may not be exactly what Canon users were expecting or hoping for. This upgrade is not a typical firmware update where camera owners navigate to Canon’s website, download firmware and install. Instead, cameras must be sent to a Canon service center and upgraded there, and there is a fee. The cost to upgrade a 5D Mark IV to be able to shoot video in C-LOG will be $99. This is leaving some Canon users feeling a little swindled, especially as Sony has just announced their new flagship a9 camera, which is, as per typical Sony style, very generous with the features and at a price point that, while not by any means low, makes their competitors look like miserly Scrooge figures sitting on their money stacks and sticking it to their customers for what they’re offering. The upgrade will be available starting in July, at which time Canon will also begin integrating C-LOG into newly shipped 5D Mark IV bodies, but at a $100 markup in line with the service fee for current 5D Mark IV users. [REWIND:] TEARING APART A BRAND NEW CANON 5D MARK IV TO SEE HOW ITS BRAIN WORKS All things considered, $99 isn’t a whole lot to ask for what C-LOG can offer to videographers, but it has come as a surprise to users anticipating a standard firmware rollout. If there is any kind of hardware update involved, which is likely since the service center visit is required, it can hardly be expected that Canon would offer manual labor that they must pay for, for free for something that is an upgrade and not a “fix.” But if you’re still insulted by the charge, you can add some injury to that – from the disclaimer on Canon’s site, it looks like you’ll also have to pay shipping to send it to the service center. Upgrade price debate aside, benefits according to Canon are a wider dynamic range (specifically, C-LOG is designed to utilize the camera’s entire dynamic range at ISOs of 400 and higher), better details in shadows, less clipping in highlights, and enhanced grading options. Bear in mind that shooting C-LOG means grading will absolutely be necessary, but your results will be better in the end. Here is an example comparing video shot with Canon’s “Standard Picture Style,” in C-LOG straight out of the camera, and C-LOG footage that’s been graded: As you can see, C-LOG really does offer an impressive change in what you can achieve with your video footage after a some grading (of course, one is under no obligation to crank the saturation, but I digress.) Check out Canon’s video explaining all the technical details here: Canon’s promo page for the upgrade can be viewed here. So, is C-LOG capabilities on a 5D...

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Instagram Takes First Step Towards ‘Adopting’ Pinterest’s Claim To Fame | Organize Saved Photos

Posted by on Apr 22, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Instagram Takes First Step Towards ‘Adopting’ Pinterest’s Claim To Fame | Organize Saved Photos

Instagram is mutating, evolving, and part of that means a change of feature-set is always on the horizon . Since last fall the imaging behemoth has been rather steadily adding both features for entertainment and for functionality, and if their numbers are any evidence to the matter, they’re doing well. This latest feature-add is the ability to organize and create collections within saved posts, and looks set to make Instagram even more of a tool for creatives. “Starting this week, you can save posts into private collections. Tap and hold the bookmark icon underneath any post to save it directly to a collection. You can create and name a new collection when you save a post, or you can add it to one you’ve already created. You can also create a collection out of your existing saved posts. Tap the plus icon in the top right corner, give your collection a name and select the saved posts you’d like to add. You can find your collections on the saved posts tab on your profile. Just like all saved posts, your collections are private — only you can see them.” The benefit of this is rather an obvious one, because it’ll allow for the collection, search, reference, and organization of images which can be used for inspiration boards, and almost all the rest that we do with Pinterest. The stark difference in this instance is it appears you can’t share those collections, and that makes it less useful than Pinterest in a rather important aspect. [REWIND: Instagram For The Working Photographer | Clients Can Soon Book You In-App] We know that Instagram stories have become a resounding hit and have surpassed Snapchat in daily active users (something around 200 million to 161 – as per Snap’s IPO data), and it’s important to note that this feature was ‘borrowed’ from another social media platform which it has, in a sense, beat at its own game. This means, essentially, that one of Instagram’s greatest successes came from adopting the core feature of another platform, and while IG has been plucking some creative genius from Snap, the newest platform in its line of sight is Pinterest and perhaps we can expect a similar result. Starting this week, you can save posts into private collections. Tap and hold the bookmark icon underneath any post to save it directly to a collection. You can create and name a new collection when you save a post, or you can add it to one you’ve already created. You can also create a collection out of your existing saved posts. Tap the plus icon in the top right corner, give your collection a name and select the saved posts you’d like to add. You can find your collections on the saved posts tab on your profile. Just like all saved posts, your collections are private — only you...

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The Complete Posing Workshop (Preorder!)

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

The Complete Posing Workshop (Preorder!)

Posing is one of the most challenging subjects you will face as a portrait photographer. A photographer might memorize poses, use example images or even posing cards to have the client repeat in front of the camera, but you still face the age old issue of poses looking too posed. The Complete Posing Workshop course dives into posing unlike any other with live demonstrations of flattering posing techniques and coaching on how to be a director and not just a photographer. Pre-order it here for $99 before our release on April 30th! Purchase Page: The Complete Posing WorkshopDiscount: Applied At CheckoutExpiration: April 30th, 2017 Click to Subscribe! Our comprehensive workshop will be covering everything you need to know about how to pose & interact with your clients to create incredible imagery from: Mastering Flattering Poses for Male and Female Subjects Perfecting the Details & Understanding Body Language & Nuances Eliciting Genuine Emotions and Candid Moments Posing Large Groups With Ease 8 Hours of HD videos & Powerpoint Slides NEVER GET STUCK WITH A BORING POSE EVER AGAIN Being a director will instantly make you and your artwork stand out from a crowd, because you will deliver natural and authentic imagery regardless of the clients or situation. Learn Posing From the ground up Our easy to teach Foundation Posing Framework helps you communicate exactly what you need from your clients without complicating posing. With an understanding of basic poses you can make micro adjustments to create interesting, unique poses. PERFECT THE DETAILS We get so caught up with the ‘big picture’ image and forget to focus on the small details of our poses. Learn the importance of hand placement and why even a finger has the potential to ruin an image UNIQUE, EDITORIAL GROUP POSING Stop struggling over group posing with our simple tips & tricks. Focus on connecting with your clients instead of stressing over posing. TAKE ‘SAY CHEESE’ OUT OF YOUR VOCABULARY Be a Director first and then a Photographer – easily direct your subjects using posing cues to produce candid, story-telling imagery by learning how to be charismatic. Make micro-adjustments to create flattering poses for your female subjects that show off their body in the right way. Learn the difference between Classic posing and High Fashion Editorial styling to create unforgettable images for your clients. Pre-order The Complete Posing Workshop here for $99 before our release on April 30th! Purchase Page: The Complete Posing Workshop Discount: Applied At Checkout Expiration: April 30th, 2017        Share...

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Better Battery Life For Sony Mirrorless | The Sony Multi-Battery Adapter Kit

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Better Battery Life For Sony Mirrorless | The Sony Multi-Battery Adapter Kit

One of the clear signals sent by Sony’s announcement of the a9 is that they are not only paying attention to, but, more importantly, finding ways to address the complaints about their products. The list of issues could be longer but, here are a few complaints users have voiced: inefficient menus, ergonomics, lack of lenses, and battery life. The battery life issues stem from Sony’s commitment to a smaller form factor for their bodies. And while the a9’s larger battery is a step in the right direction, it still isn’t on the level with comparable DSLRs from Canon or Nikon. With the Sony Multi-Battery Adapter Kit, they are taking up the challenge of rectifying their battery power woes; let’s what they’re offering. Specs For NP-FZ1000 & NP-FW50 Type Cameras Extends Shooting Time Holds up to Four NP-FZ100 Battery Packs Rapidly Charge Batteries Charges Four Batteries in 480 Minutes Converts to Compact Two-Battery Pack Two USB Ports for Charging Devices Three-Level LED Indicator Light Six 1/4″-20 Mounting Sockets Includes Two NP-FZ100 Battery Packs The beauty of this accessory is that is not only addresses the power limitations of Sony’s new a9 and any future cameras, but it is also compatible with any Sony camera that uses the NP-FW50 battery. This means you have a 1st-party power solution for your a5xxx, a6xxx, and a7xx series cameras. The catch is that, at $400, it is not a cheap solution, but this isn’t foreign territory for video shooters who are accustomed building out rigs around their camera’s shortcomings. One nice feature to call attention to is that you can choose whether to power your camera or charge your battery when connected to DC power. This accessory is an encouraging and revealing move from Sony. They care about your battery life complaints, but the issue probably won’t be solved in camera any time soon. Still, its not a half measure deployed to placate the Sony faithful, but a well thought out attempt to serve them. If you are interested in adding this to your kit, you can preorder your here.        Share...

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How to Shoot and Stitch a Panorama Photo

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to Shoot and Stitch a Panorama Photo

Sometimes the landscape is just too big. Sometimes, just one image won’t do the trick. Then it’s time to create a panorama! I’m fortunate to spend a lot of time in the grand landscapes of Alaska. But often, camera in hand, I’ve stood there, unable to create the image I wanted. There was just too much going on, or things were happening in a way that just didn’t match a typical single-image format. I was photographing along a gravel beach near Haines, Alaska this winter, while the alpenglow was lighting up the peaks across the inlet. The glaciers and spires were painted in peach light. Going super wide to capture it all, with my 14mm, made the mountains too small and distant, and left too much empty space. I wanted the details in the I was photographing along a gravel beach near Haines, Alaska this winter, while the alpenglow was lighting up the peaks across the inlet (see image above). The glaciers and spires were painted in peach light. Going super wide to capture it all, with my 14mm, made the mountains too small and distant, and left too much empty space. I wanted the details in the mountains while maintaining a sense of the vast landscape. A panorama was the only way to go. Panoramas are hardly a novelty, Smartphones and many point and shoots can create them in-camera. But stitching together images from a DSLR or other high-resolution camera will yield better results if you do it right. Sadly, panoramas are easy to screw up. Here are a few tips for making an effective panorama from a series of images. What lens to use to make a panorama Making a panorama isn’t the time to use a wide angle lens. The optical distortion inherent in these lenses tends to mess with the process of stitching them together. Pick a standard lens or a short telephoto; something between 40mm and 100mm will work well, though I’ve occasionally gone as high as 200mm if the situation warrants. Remove all filters from your lens, especially polarizers. They can cause gradations across an image that are impossible to work with later, so get that thing off your camera. Cameras and settings I shoot all panorama images in RAW format. This allows me greater flexibility in post-processing to make sure that exposures, white balance, and other settings match from one image to the next. That said if you are careful in-camera, and manually select all your settings from ISO to exposure and white balance, you can get by with JPGs. Exposure Take a few sample shots of your subject. If you are shooting a landscape that varies in tones, meter off the brightest part of your scene and make the image as bright as possible without blowing out the highlights. Take note of those numbers (exposure settings), then using Manual Mode set...

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