How to make yourself invisible in light painting photos

Posted by on Nov 18, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to make yourself invisible in light painting photos

Eric Paré is best known for his stunning light painting photos and helpful tutorials. In all his photos, he remains invisible even though he stands behind the model and draws shapes with lights. He does it all in-camera, and many people have wondered how he does it. In this video, Eric and his partner Kim Henry share a few tricks […] The post How to make yourself invisible in light painting photos appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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Photoshop Better | Five Tips To Make Better Use Of Your Wacom Tablet

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Photoshop Better | Five Tips To Make Better Use Of Your Wacom Tablet

Wacom tablets are incredibly useful tools for those who often work in Adobe programs doing anything other than moving sliders. They may have a bit of a learning curve as new users adjust to the feeling of using a pen to move a computer’s cursor on what amounts to a large, pressure-sensitive trackpad that correlates to your screen’s real estate, but if you put in the time to let it become second nature you will be rewarded in dividends. As with many things related to retouching, there is more to using a Wacom tablet than meets the eye. Little secrets are hovering beneath the surface that can take an already rich experience up a notch. Colin Smith of PhotoshopCAFE has created a 10-minute video detailing five tips to get even more out of your Wacom Tablet. [Rewind:] Wacom ‘Sketch’ & ‘Ink’ | Bringing Apple Pencil-Like Functionality To All iPads For instance, had you thought of tracing on a Wacom? And if you had, did you notice that the traced shapes did not look quite as they should? By going into your tablet’s settings in System Preferences or Control Panel and checking the “force proportions” box under the “mapping” tab, what you draw, whether traced or free-hand, will not be stretched or squished. What this does is forces your Wacom tablet to correlate exactly to your screen area, even if they do not have the same aspect ratio. To see all of the tips, watch the video below!        Share...

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Hasselblad X1D | Hassy Launches ‘Rent A Hasselblad’

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Hasselblad X1D | Hassy Launches ‘Rent A Hasselblad’

The allure of Medium format is ever present, and more so today than ever before, given the more affordable cost, more manageable sizes, and the more attractive styles. There is probably no medium format camera that embodies this quite as completely as the Hasselblad X1D. It’s under $9k, is smaller than a D850, and infinitely cooler looking. But is it for you? Well, our review is en route (probably the toughest camera I’ve reviewed in recent memory) but there’s no substitute for actually using one, and now you can rent it. Hasselblad has just launched their ‘Rent A Hasselblad’ program in countries across the globe (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Spain, Switzerland, UK, USA), providing the best opportunity to ‘try before you buy’. It’s a global online service that you can get through in a matter of a few minutes, and the only hiccup to be found thus far, is that seeing what availability is in a particular location for a particular time isn’t really fleshed out, so it’s a bit of trial and error. That said, it’s worth the effort, and Hasselblad’s are not as plentiful as your run-of-the-mill Nikon, so quantity affecting availability is to be a little more expected. Perhaps more so that the prices aren’t really exorbitant, and the money you spend goes toward the purchase of the camera if you buy within 2 weeks of a rental. Considering the X1D is a $9k camera the rental price of $90 USD a day (in the US) isn’t bad. In fact, it’s 1% of the camera’s sticker price – a little more in other parts of the world. The lenses are also reasonably priced at $26 for the XCD 90mm 3.2 and $22 for the XCD 45mm 3.5, so you could have a nicely fleshed out kit for $148 a day. Check out the full press release below, and of course check out the camera. It’s been on the receiving end of mixed reviews, and understandable given the new foray in which it lives, and the iterative software approach the company has taken, but it’s really come into its own and a wonderful camera in its own right. 2017-11-16 HASSELBLAD LAUNCHES ‘RENT A HASSELBLAD’ – A NEW WAY TO EXPERIENCE AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HASSELBLAD MEDIUM FORMAT TECHNOLOGY ‘Rent a Hasselblad’ enables easier and on-demand access to Hasselblad medium format cameras and lenses for photography enthusiasts and professionals. Hasselblad, the leading manufacturer of medium format cameras and lenses, is introducing the ‘Rent a Hasselblad’ service. The service has been created to allow photography enthusiasts and professionals to benefit from the advantages of medium format technology. “Owning a Hasselblad medium format camera system is a significant investment even for a successful high-paid photographer,” said Bronius Rudnickas, Hasselblad Marketing Manager. “Consequently, many professional photographers and enthusiasts haven’t had the opportunity to see what they’re able to create...

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Skype vs Snapchat? | Microsoft Is Moving Into The Social Space

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Skype vs Snapchat? | Microsoft Is Moving Into The Social Space

Instagram announced their ‘Stories’ feature a little over a year ago and the add-on was in direct competition with Snapchat’s main feature: allowing users to post fleeting pictures and videos that expire in 24 hours. Engagement of Instagram Stories has increased exponentially as more users take advantage of the ever-increasing feature-set of face filters, location tags, stickers, drawing tools; some creatives even leverage their Stories as ephemeral advertisements. Tensions have risen between the two applications as Instagram continues to imitate Snapchat, except execute better, and Microsoft is trying to slice ou their own corner of this media market with their Skype consumer app. You read that right. The team at Redmond just has crafted a deal with Swing Technologies, a startup that makers of the “living photo” app SWNG. [REWIND: What’s New With Instagram | Evolving Business Tools & Improved User Experience] Launched in 2016, under the guise of Polaroid Swing, SWNG had the mission to ‘reimagine’ the photograph. The SWNG app allows users to create interactive one-second clips or ‘living photos’, similar to the Live Photos feature on iPhones since the 6s. Polaroid Swing tried to revive the once prestigious photographic icon by using its likeness and name prominently in the app. However, with the Polaroid IP acquired by the largest shareholder of the Impossible Project in May of this year, anything that licensed the Polaroid name had to be rebranded, including SWNG. “Swing Technologies has developed a range of imaging technology across software and hardware, with senior employees recruited from Apple, Instagram and beyond. Swing is backed by top-tier investors and individuals including Twitter Co-Founder Biz Stone.“ “This is a unique opportunity for the team to bring our ideas to a global audience,” said Tommy Stadlen, Co-Founder of Swing Technologies. “It’s an exciting time to join Microsoft, which is thriving under the leadership of Satya Nadella. We believe in the power of brands and technology, so the Skype mission and values resonate strongly with us.” – Swing Technologies via their press release. Microsoft acquired all but the name and didn’t buy the company outright, instead Swing employees and the tech behind them are migrating to Microsoft. The team at Swing will join the Skype development group to contribute “imaging technology and customer experiences” in Skype messaging and calling – maybe in hopes of implementing a ‘boomerang’-like effect to the platform. “The Swing team’s deep expertise in imaging technology will help us deliver great new features and capabilities for Skype,” said Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President for Skype, Amritansh Raghav. “They have an impressive track record of delivering great user experiences and brand design around the technology they develop. I welcome the new team members and am excited about how Swing will deliver innovation to our customers.” The terms of the deal have not been divulged to the public. To read the full press release check out SWNG, here....

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How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to Shoot High-Traffic Locations Creatively

The experience of the hustle and bustle that comes from shooting in high-traffic, highly photographed areas is a pain that most photographers know all too well. People can be packed into overlooks and pull-offs with hardly even room to stand let alone set up a tripod. It seems as if everyone is trying to get the same shot. Not that there’s something incredibly wrong with making photographs just like the person standing next to you. If you are simply after a snapshot to record where you’ve been then a quick capture or two taken from the herd will do just fine. However, if you’re like me, you probably want more from a location than just a cookie cutter photo. When I visit a well-known photo spot that is crowded with people all shooting the exact same thing, I feel a need to produce something that is more of an artistic expression of how I view the scene. While recently shooting in Yosemite National Park, I observed this situation in full force. But how can you shoot in these high-traffic areas creatively? Believe it or not, in some cases it doesn’t require too much effort in order to breathe new life into a stale or overshot scene. In this article, we’re going to talk about three ways that can help you break the monotony and guide you toward making your photos of well-known areas less ordinary. #1 – Get High…Get Low Changing from the common perspective to one that is either more or less elevated can have a huge impact on the final interest of your photographs. Often times, the majority of photographers shoot from the same plane of view each and every time which often produces literal “photocopies” of the same location. This changeup doesn’t have to be anything drastic, either. It can be as simple as holding your camera at waist level or even above your head. If you’re able to be more adventurous, then search for even more unique vantage points. Ones which can show people a well-known place from a different angle than what they’re used to seeing. This is the key to setting yourself apart as a photographer. This was just up the road from the famous Tunnel View in Yosemite. While it’s virtually the same landscape, the higher elevation adds a different feel to the scene. #2 – Shoot at Night This is likely the easiest and most powerful methods of creatively photographing popular locations. There’s almost always less crowding (unless it’s a spot popular exclusively at night) which will give you much more room and creates a more relaxed experience. However, the most obvious benefit that comes from shooting at night is the instant change in the visual appeal of the landscape. The inclusion of stars and moonlight or even bright city lights and cars can add so much to a scene that...

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ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate: Efficient RAW Workflow for Professionals

Posted by on Nov 17, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate: Efficient RAW Workflow for Professionals

A good workflow is such a powerful, time-saving and inspiring thing. There is even a certain romance to it – a routine of steps melting into the background that lead to a finished photograph. This creates a result to be proud of, one to inspire you to go out and photograph more, be it a product shot, an image from a recent trip to Iceland (everyone seems to be going to Iceland), or an artistic portrait. It can also be an inexhaustible source of frustration or an excuse for procrastination. I know it’s certainly been all of these things for me, and the latter much more often in the past. The people behind ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate must have had a similar experience, too, but they created tools that set up a solid workflow foundation for any photographer. Somehow, my desktop really is this clean. I don’t know how. Mind you, ACD Systems faces an obvious, towering obstacle by the name of Lightroom, a piece of software that has been the industry standard for nearly a decade now. I’ve used it extensively and exclusively for just about every project in the past seven or eight years. And let’s be honest, for all of its faults, Lightroom has been the most popular choice with good reason. It does many things right. In light of Adobe’s recent (or was it really recent?) change of policy regarding payment (among other things), however, I have felt the need to take a look around and see if perhaps there are alternatives. ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate is certainly one. In this article, I will go through a workflow that I’ve been using with Photo Studio Ultimate as I got myself properly acquainted with it. While I realize it’s an entirely subjective approach to managing and editing photographs, I hope that it will at least give you a good starting point from which to individualize. An important disclaimer: The license to this copy of ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate 2018 has been provided by the company; I did not purchase it. Having said that, it’s my subjective opinion and findings that you are reading here. ACD Systems (rather happily, I must add) had next to no say in it. My words are always my own. What is ACDSee Photo Studio Ultimate? Quick Overview Many have heard – or even used – some version of ACDSee. No surprise there as it’s around two decades old now and actually precedes Lightroom. But there are few areas where Adobe does not have a monopoly, and while many remember ACD Systems, it’s not nearly as popular as Lightroom. Perhaps undeservedly so, because pretty much everything Lightroom does, ACDSee does too. First and foremost, Photo Studio Ultimate 2018 is an image management software. It started off as a lightweight viewer and organizer and has not lost the idea over the years. But...

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