10 Beautiful Images of Cities Covered in Fog

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

10 Beautiful Images of Cities Covered in Fog

White blanket of fog adds a layer of mystery and beauty to cities, giving them a serene look. Here’s 10 incredible pictures of the cities around the world covered in a white blanket of fog. Winter Fog Blanketing Dubai Skyscrapers, © NAME Extremely Foggy Day in Chicago © NAME Aerial View Of Shanghai Under Fog © NAME Fog Over Vancouver, Canada © NAME Modern Office Buildings in Shanghai Under Fog © NAME Fog Over Vancouver, Canada © NAME Famous Golden Gate Bridge with Low Fog, San Francisco © NAME Mist Enshrouds the Iconic New York City Skyline © NAME Hong Kong Skyscrapers in Stratosphere Fog at Night © NAME Shanghai Skyline in Sea of Clouds © NAME Adrift from Simon Christen on Vimeo. Check out more black and white foggy city images        Share...

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Sony A9 vs Adapted Long Lenses | Reality Vs Expectations

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Sony A9 vs Adapted Long Lenses | Reality Vs Expectations

If there’s one primary, recurring, and pervasive criticism when discussing the Sony A9, it is, without question, the Sony E-Mount lens range – how it’s lacking and what that means for the A9. When something as novel as the A9 comes out (and not from Canon or Nikon) it’s sure to rile the critics, but while many critiques of the A9 are out of place, this one carries with it some weight. Sony has marketed the A9 from the moment of its launch as a sports camera, touting frame rate, AF ability et cetera, and currently the longest focal length to be had with E-mount is 300mm in the form of the not-so-fast FE 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 G OSS. Following soon will come the FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS (which functions really well) but again we’re looking at slower lenses here. As it stands at the moment of this writing, if it’s reach and speed you seek with an A9 you’ll have to adapt – say, from Canon or A Mount. The stink of it is that we know adapted lens functionality is typically crippled, so the question is how viable an option are adapted long and fast lenses on the A9, and consequently, if you’re a sports shooter should you get it now? A friend, Dan Watson of Learning Cameras, has decided to test just that. SONY A9 REVIEW / OVERVIEW| THE AFFIRMATION OF MIRRORLESS & WISH FULFILLMENT Equipped with a Sigma MC-11 and Metabones Mark IV adapters, Dan pairs the A9 with a Canon 400mm F2.8 and Canon 300mm F2.8 lenses to test functionality, and the results were a bit of a mixed bag. Immediately Dan highlights that your choice of focus modes is limited giving you only Wide, Center, and Single-point Flexible Spot, and your useful focus points seem to be limited to more a center cluster, and not at the extremities as per normal. In addition, adapted lenses in AF-C mode will not track a subject if your burst rate is higher than the Low setting, so you won’t be getting 15 FPS, much less the full 20 FPS the camera is capable of achieving. When in Low Mode, however, his demonstration concludes that it tracks just fine. None of this should really come as a surprise for anyone who has seriously looked at the system for sports or wildlife purposes, because there are always concessions to be made when adapting, and Sony has stated these limitations in the literature: “When a mount adaptor (LA-EA1/LA-EA2/LA-EA3/LA-EA4) and an A-mount lens are attached to the camera, the continuous shooting speed and availability of autofocus tracking varies depending on shooting conditions such as shutter type, focus mode and the attached lens” It would be interesting to see, now in comparison, how the behavior would be different using A-Mount long lenses like the Sony 500mm f/4.0 G SSM and Sony...

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How to Tell a Story With Your Street Photography

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to Tell a Story With Your Street Photography

Street photographs on the surface may seem like they are independent of one another and can only go so far at telling a story, unlike say photojournalism. In some cases, this can be true, but there actually is a lot of crossover between documentary and street photography. Your street photographs can certainly tell a story. If you look at the individual books or even the entire bodies of work of photographers like Martin Parr, Trent Parke, Garry Winogrand, or Josef Koudelka, you can see that these photographers had a point of view. They were able to tell real stories with their photography. How do you tell stories with street photography? But how do you do this? If you are just starting out with street photography, you’re most likely focused on taking good shots and not on overarching themes. You never have to start trying to show comprehensive themes in your work, many great photographers don’t. But if you want to, plan on developing this over time. The reality is that there is nothing more important than consistent time spent shooting. But while you are developing, here are some tips to help you get there. *The photos used in this article are all part of a series called Luxury for Lease, which is about the disconnection, hyper-gentrification, conformity, and consumerism that has noticeably increased in New York since 9/11. 1. Create collections in Lightroom and group your images based on ideas and themes When you’re out shooting you want a clear head. Be open to whatever happens, so you give yourself the best chance to get lucky. Sometimes, if you’re too focused on one thing, you will miss everything else around you. But during the editing phase is when you can really start to figure out what you are shooting. This is where you can develop your voice. Look through your photos, choose your favorites, and start to put them together. Pick out your images that seem to have some similarities in content, tone, or look. They don’t have to perfectly relate, just in some way. Brainstorm, try a lot of things, and just have fun with it. I use Collections in Lightroom to do this. Collections allow you to put images into a folder without moving them physically on your hard drive. It is a great way to build portfolios of your work and to build and change around stories and ideas. Over time, these stories will develop. Sometimes they will turn into nothing and you will scrap them, but other times they will morph. Sometimes the seed will develop into a fully formed idea over years of shooting, and the end result will be something that you couldn’t have imagined at the beginning. That’s the fun part, and it will help you to think critically while you are out shooting. It will add a new layer to your...

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How to Shoot a Basic Model Test | Gear, Shot List, Agency Requirements & More

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to Shoot a Basic Model Test | Gear, Shot List, Agency Requirements & More

With the shifting requirements for model tests, there is a misconception that all test shoots must be grandiose productions and equipped with a full team. In fact, when first approaching a modeling agency to test you will almost always be asked if you have a team. HOW TO TEST SHOOT WITH MODEL AGENCY REPRESENTED MODELS Lou from Red Model Management, NYC. Gear: Canon 5D Mark III, Canon 85mm 1.2L II Tech Specs: ISO 200, f/4, 1/500th of a second. Having A Team & Going Solo Having a consistent team will most likely garner more test shoots; some of which may even be paid in the future. In the beginning, however, a team may prove difficult to come by. If you do not have a team, do not fret. An essential lesson to take away from testing is learning to maximize production value with as few resources as possible. This is not ideal, but it does teach the bare essentials. Rest assured that once you learn to master this by yourself your work only improves. I was a one-person show when I first began and it allows me to jump in wherever needed if someone on my team isn’t available due to a last minute booking. It has also helped me be a better director. Being able to deliver and elevate a quality basic test shoot is priceless. Lou from Red Model Management, NYC. Gear: Canon 5D Mark III, Canon 85mm 1.2L II, Broncolor Siros L 800Ws, Broncolor Beautybox 65 Softbox Tech Specs: ISO 200, f/10, 1/160th of a second. Mood Boards & Styling Mood boards are a key component to model test shoots as they set the mood and expectation. Most agencies will request to see a mood board in the beginning to make sure your vision is in alignment with theirs. It also helps keep everyone on track for the duration of the shoot. When it comes to styling, the days of having the model scantily clad in a pair of jeans and nothing else are gone. Unless the test is specifically geared toward body images, the more clothing the better. Choose simple and classic items that pervade a tone of timelessness. Inquire if the model has any pieces that will fit this vision. Black, white and other neutral colors are perfect. For everything else that is still needed, check out vintage stores and other major retailers such as H&M. These are great choices that are easy on the bank account. You may even be able to rent pieces online or borrow from a friend. Make sure to ask the model to bring a pair of nude and/or black heels as well as nude undergarments. Two to three looks are more than sufficient. Lou from Red Model Management, NYC. Gear: Canon 5D Mark III, Canon 85mm 1.2L II Tech Specs: ISO 100, f/2.8, 1/320th of a second. Hair...

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Quick Gear Tip | How To Maximize Your C-Stand

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Quick Gear Tip | How To Maximize Your C-Stand

C-stands are a staple in photography, and probably one of the most versatile pieces of gear in your arsenal. However, they can be as cumbersome as they are helpful if you’re not adept at using them. At times, you will find yourself looking for ways to work around them because of their size and weight, but weight is simply one of the trade-offs of buying high-quality gear, and you want a C-Stand to be sturdy. Nevertheless, there are ways to remedy some of these issues and J.P. Morgan and the crew from the Slanted Lens are back with a quick tip of how to use C-stands. [RELATED: C-STAND BASICS | HOW TO USE & HANDLE ONE OF THE MOST VERSATILE TOOLS] Leg Placement One of the questions that Jay P. frequently encounters is about where to position the legs of his C-Stand, and instead of a textbook method he’s gone with he delivers his own. If you have a shot where the floor is visible but you still need to maximize the reach of your C-Stand, you can align the legs of your stand with your camera’s field of view to keep them out of the shot. This tip runs counter to the conventional method of using a C-Stand which teaches you to keep your stand’s longest leg underneath the extended arm to provide the most support for anything mounted on that arm. To overcome the loss of stability, you can rotate your long leg towards the back weight as seen below. This might seem like a simple tip, but as J.P. demonstrates, it can have an important impact on your stand’s versatility, and if you only stick to the conventional way of using your kit, you may be limiting yourself. It’s a good reminder that for every tool there’s a hack. [REWIND: HEADSHOT PHOTOGRAPHY 101: CULLING: MIND THE DETAILS] SaveSave        Share...

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10 Amazing Photography Tricks You Can do at Home with Everyday Objects

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

10 Amazing Photography Tricks You Can do at Home with Everyday Objects

Here is a quick video showing you 10 photography tricks or projects you can try at home using everyday objects. You may have some of these things lying around your house, if not most are inexpensive to buy. Try some of these ideas: Make it snow indoors Use a magnifying glass for fun effects Create your own light flare Try some refraction using water drops or a glass Have any others? Please share your ideas in the comments below. The post 10 Amazing Photography Tricks You Can do at Home with Everyday Objects by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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