6 Helpful Tips for Doing Interior Architecture Photography

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

6 Helpful Tips for Doing Interior Architecture Photography

Shooting interior architecture photography can be challenging to get just right. Here are six tips to help you have more success with this type of photography. 21mm focal length, f/11, ISO 100, 1/200th. One off-camera flash used. 1) Always use a tripod There are two main reasons why you always want to use a tripod for architecture photography. First, a tripod will perfectly stabilize your camera/lens setup, which fully mitigates any possibility of motion blur from hand-holding the camera. Additionally, if you’re on a tripod, it’s much easier to make sure your camera is level (I’ll discuss the importance of a level camera later in this article). Secondly, there’s no good reason NOT to use a tripod (I follow the general rule that, unless there’s a good reason not to have a tripod, I always use one). If you were tracking subjects which required quick movement and recomposition, then a tripod would be a hindrance. But, for architecture photography, your composition will always sit nice and still for you, giving you all the time in the world to set the shot up right. The ideal situation for a tripod. 21mm focal length, f/11, ISO 100, 1/120th. One off-camera flash used. 2) Whenever possible, use a flash If you shoot a room indoors without a flash, you will typically get shadows scattered around the room. Using a flash for interior architecture will help balance the exposure across the entire frame. This is how I typically use a flash. Put the flash on a tripod or a stand, and place it a few feet away from the camera (on each side of the camera if you use two flashes for larger rooms), and a foot or so behind the camera. Aim the flashes so they are pointing up at the ceiling, but also slightly away from the room you’re shooting. At this angle, the light from the flashes will illuminate the room indirectly (i.e. bouncing off the ceiling and walls), creating a soft, even, fill-in light for the room you’re shooting. Set the flashes manually at half power (one stop below full power) and fire away! This was a tricky shot because my flash was reflecting off the windows no matter where I positioned it. So I took two shots (one with flash and one without) and masked them together in Photoshop. The windows you see in this image are from the shot without a flash, while the rest of the room is from the shot with the flash. 3) When shooting whole rooms, don’t get too wide When I first started taking practice photos of architectural photography, I used the widest angle lens I could get my hands on to shoot entire rooms. My thinking was that with an ultra-wide lens, I could get more of the room in the frame. But more isn’t always better. I quickly noticed the...

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10x More Expensive Doesn’t Mean 10x Better | Minute Photography

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

10x More Expensive Doesn’t Mean 10x Better | Minute Photography

Welcome to our latest series, Minute Photography, where we explain photography and lighting tips & tricks, myths, and techniques. For more education and detail about this concept, be sure to check out our Photography 101 Workshop. In this episode, we consider the value of investing in education vs. upgrading your gear, and why owning expensive gear won’t necessarily make you a better photographer. $800 VS. $5400 IMAGES. CAN YOU TELL WHAT’S WHAT? Professional cameras and lenses often cost five to ten times more than their consumer counterparts, yet for the most part, you are not getting five to ten times better image quality. To capture the images above, we used a Canon T5i with the Canon 85mm f/1.8 ($800 at the time of the shoot) vs the Canon 5D Mark 3 with the Canon 85mm f/1.2 L II ($5400 at the time of the shoot). For both images, we used the sun as a hair light and a Westcott 5-1 reflector as the key light for the subject. The image quality is nearly identical, which reveals that it’s the photographer’s use of composition and lighting that really has a stronger impact. You can learn more about how to elevate your photography and make the most of your camera gear in our Photography 101 Workshop. Considering the marginally better images you can capture for the money you spend on higher end gear, the benefits of owning such gear are limited: Improved resolution Better low light capabilities Increased dynamic range While advanced professionals can justify the high cost for a marginal improvement, most amateur photographers will never reach the full potential of their gear, whether they’re using point-and-shoot cameras or smart phone cameras. [REWIND: how to visually change your white balance] THE POWER OF EDUCATION Professional images have much more to do with who’s behind the camera and how he or she chooses to light and shoot a scene rather than what gear is being used to capture it. It is our experience and our knowledge that helps us capture images in unique ways. This is why we created SLR Lounge Premium. We believe the best place to invest is in your education, not in your gear. Stay tuned for more simple & effective photography tips & tricks in our Minute Photography series!        Share...

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RNI Releases 39 Film Styles with ‘All Film 4’ Lite Pack for Capture One

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

RNI Releases 39 Film Styles with ‘All Film 4’ Lite Pack for Capture One

Going beyond the detail, sharpness, and exact color representation of digital photography; the certain allure of film can be unquantifiable. The allure of the bright and vivid colors of Velvia, beautiful skin tones of Portra, and the pastel-like Pro 400H, continue to draw photographers, both digital and analog alike. Each stock had its own unite fingerprint that it left on our images. Either from our memories stored in shoeboxes and albums or the look of iconic images, film romanticizes our images with a delicate balance of color and tone, expressive power that digital lacks (without help). There are countless presets for Adobe-branded products that promise the film-like look, we even have a few included in our Preset system; but those who venture outside of the walled-garden can be left wanting. A few weeks back Capture One released its own line of presets called ‘Styles’, and now the people at RNI (Really Nice Images) have released their All Film 4 Lite pack for Capture One. Kodak E200 SOOC vs Kodachrome 2000s v2 [REWIND: INTRODUCING CAPTURE ONE STYLES PACKS – BRINGING EVEN MORE PROCESSING ADVANTAGES TO COP] Styles in Capture One are more closely aligned to presets as you may be used to in Lightroom. In Capture One a preset is a saved pre-made adjustment that pertains to only one tool and applied by that tool, whereas a Style is a pre-made adjustment for one or many tools. Based on the color science of actual film samples, the London-based company has reworked their popular All Film 4 pack for Lightroom “to produce a beautiful and accurate match in Capture One”. Styles Include: Fuji Pro 400H Fuji Velvia 50 Kodachrome 1958 Kodak Gold 200 Kodak Portra 160C Using the styles is very straight forward and doesn’t require a Toolkit like Lightroom. The styles can be applied an individual image, batch process, and even apply them while shooting tethered. The $59 pack contains 39 styles in both a clean and grainy variant with popular stocks, you can get them here. There is no word yet when the “Pro” version will be available. Fuji Astia 100F Agfa Vista 100 EV Fuji Natura 1600 Kodak Portra 160C v1        Share...

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The Future Of Nikon With The D850 & Mirrorless | Life & Death At The Doorstep

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

The Future Of Nikon With The D850 & Mirrorless | Life & Death At The Doorstep

Well, the time is now. If you hadn’t noticed lately, the quiet thoughts about the failures of the primary pillars of the camera world, Canon and Nikon, have crescendoed from backroom forum chatter to full operatic bellow. To many, they’re a stone’s throw away from the cemetery’s creeky gate and a headstone. In fact, for a few months now we were lead to think that, for Nikon, the guillotine had all but already fallen. I mean, just imagine if that was the case. What if it were true? Fathom that, if you can. There would’ve been miles of column inches written about the power and brilliance of Nikon engineering, and people like me would’ve penned volumes about what Nikon was, and perhaps what it should’ve been. There would’ve been altars erected to it to which we’d make pilgrimages to and genuflect upon passing, and eulogies dedicated to the brand so soulful, so Hemingway, that tears would turn the page’s purple prose into illegible violet watercolor. Then, for months and ever after, everyone who had a film Nikon tucked away in an attic would dig them out, attach a pretty strap and carry them everywhere. Carrying a Nikon would become a statement. Film sales would rise, and they’d end up in the hands of the movie stars and bloggers of the moment; gracing the ‘pages’ of PopSugar and Vogue. Nikon, then, would be something it hasn’t been for ages; it would be cool; posthumously deified, and we all would’ve understood because Nikon is Nikon, and a fallen King was still a King. Death, then, is easy and faults are filtered out through the rose coloured lenses of ‘reminiscing’. We don’t criticize the dead as much as exalt them. It’s living that has the drawbacks. When you’re alive you’re fair game, and right now Nikon is in the crosshairs. Coincidentally, they’re also at a crossroads… On the one hand Nikon has had QC issues, and resided in complacency over the past 3 years. Sure the D500 may be (arguably) the best DSLR on the market, but what does the ‘I AM‘ campaign stand for now? “I AM Enough”? “I AM Unwilling To Evolve”? “I AM Lost”? “I AM”… what? For all the smart moves Nikon has made, the move from celluloid to sensor has proven problematic. Their recent foibles are of a recurring nature and seem to indicate that they would rather invest in the past than in the future and out of trouble. The hiccups have also been costly, and the problem with money troubles for these companies (even if it’s a matter of prioritization versus actually being broke) is that when they slip on their bifocals to address it and begin moving columns of numbers around P&L statements like some sort of accounting Tetris, what they’re not doing is thinking up the next big thing in their lab. Which...

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Three Good Reasons To Learn More About Photography

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Three Good Reasons To Learn More About Photography

Photography has become so popular, mainly because of the inclusion of cameras on mobile phones, so it’s more difficult for your photos to be noticed. But, if you learn a little more about photography your photos will be more likely to stand out from the crowd. Your life is full of gadgets and equipment that can be challenging to learn to use really well. Learning to use your camera will make your photography so much more enjoyable. Photography is therapy. Picking up your camera, making time to take photos, can be a wonderful break from the busy pace of your daily life. Committing even a small amount of time regularly to learn more about photography will help you enjoy the creative process of image making. It will help overcome frustrations you may have because you don’t understand your camera well enough. As you study you will find that your creative ideas and expression will come more naturally. And, as you know and understand more and begin to relax when you have your camera in your hands, you will find a personal groove and means of expression that will be unique to you. So here are three really good reasons for you to learn more about photography. #1. Create outstanding photos Most of us love to share our photos and see the response or family and friends have to them. Even more exciting is when strangers begin to show appreciation for our photographs. The desire to have your photos seen and enjoyed by others can be a real motivation for you to enjoy photography. But getting your photographs noticed is not so easy. This has become more of a challenge in recent years because pretty much everybody has a some form of a camera these days. Social media has made it extremely easy to share photos and have them seen by a potentially global audience. But how do you get your photos noticed when everyone else is sharing their photos in the same way? Take some time to learn more. Learning about light, exposure, color, tone, composition and timing will help you produce more creative, more interesting, more noticeable photographs. And, if you think about it, you probably something about these things already, because you see them all the time, but are not necessarily thinking about them. You can’t see anything if there’s no light. Light is the essence of photography. With no light, you can have no photo. Learning to appreciate different types of light and when some light is better for making photos than others, will help you create more outstanding photographs. You see light all the time and if you can begin to understand it and appreciate how to expose your photographs well, you will create more compelling images. Knowing something of the limitations of your camera and how it captures tone and color will also help...

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Use those Christmas lights during the summer to light beautiful portraits

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Use those Christmas lights during the summer to light beautiful portraits

Chrismas lights are usually in use for maybe six weeks out of the year. The other 44 weeks, they typically reside in a box in the attic or a cupboard under the stairs. It seems a bit of a waste to me. When photographer Joe Edelman‘s wife informed him she was going to a “Christmas in […] The post Use those Christmas lights during the summer to light beautiful portraits appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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