How to Light A Glass For Great Splash Photography

Posted by on Apr 19, 2016 in canon, Featured, nikon, Photography Tips

How to Light A Glass For Great Splash Photography

You can make some really creative photographs with high-speed photography. Fast shutter speeds and lights are the key components to success in freezing motion to make some spectacular special effects. From creating milky costumes for superheroes to taking your product photography to another level, there are many methods and uses for high-speed photography, and one of the most common is to freeze liquid to make a splash – literally and figuratively. Splash photography needn’t require much nor be extremely difficult. One method is to use a laser trigger to help with the process. In the following video from our friends at The Slanted Lens, Jay P. Morgan shows you how to not only use a laser trigger for high-speed splash photography but how to light a glass for a cool product photo. There isn’t an exact formula when it comes to high-speed or splash photography. All the work comes in the setup and then from there, it’s trial and error. In this instance, the first step is to properly light the glass. Jay P. points out that when you light glass, it’s about the light that goes through it, highlighting the shape and allowing a glow to come through. He does this by placing a Dynalite Baja B4 behind the glass and adjusting it to his liking. He also adds two translucent panels and a few more lights to light the sides of the glass. The glass is set on an IKEA glass tabletop, and the final component is setting up a MIOPS laser trigger. When the laser beam is broken, the strobes will be triggered faster than the blink of an eye. The rest is trial and error. As each ice cube is dropped in the glass, the timing has to be precise and the timer adjusted to get the look you want. Jay P. set his camera in bulb mode, opened the shutter with a remote to limit camera shake and adjusted his focus to the front of the glass. To see the entire process, check out the video below. Gear Used: Canon 5D Mark III Tamron 90mm Lens Canon Timer Remote Controller TC-80N3 MIOPS Smart Camera Trigger 3 Dynalite Baja B4        Share...

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Wildlife Photography With A Wide-Angle Lens For Impact| Getting Your Subject & The Surroundings

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in canon, Featured, Food, nikon, Photography Tips, Wildlife

Wildlife Photography With A Wide-Angle Lens For Impact| Getting Your Subject & The Surroundings

Capturing wildlife with a telephoto lens is the technique of ‘traditional’ wildlife photography. It’s still commonplace and most certainly has its place, with many incredible photos taken using that approach. But put down your telephoto in exchange for a wide-angle lens and you’ll open the door to a whole new perspective with your wildlife photography. It may seem challenging, and to some degree it is, but once you are used to the technique it is not necessarily more difficult than using a telephoto – the results, of course, are just different. My lens of choice for this was a Nikon 14mm f/2.8, although I have since sold it and replaced it with a Nikon 18-35mm lens. I preferred the flexibility of a zoom lens rather than a prime. Equipment You’ll Need Aside from your DSLR and a wide-angle lens, you’re going to need a few more pieces of equipment. Joby Focus Gorillapod – This flexible tripod allows you to position your camera low to the ground in all sorts of terrains. YongNuo Shutter Release – These wireless shutter releases are cheap and robust. They work over radio signals, meaning they don’t need line-of-sight to activate your camera’s trigger. They have a range of up to 100 meters too, allowing you to stand at a distance and remotely trigger your camera. Setting Up Your Photo Think about what you’re trying to achieve here. The advantage of the wide-angle lens is the ability to introduce the surroundings into your photo. You are able to document the animal and its environment simultaneously, something that isn’t always possible with a telephoto lens. Positioning the camera as low to the ground as possible gives the unique perspective, and being below the eye-level of an subject makes the viewer feel smaller than the animal, turning our expectations of wildlife photography on its head. You can see in the above image that I’ve chosen to include the woodland surroundings of this red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris). To get the squirrel to come close to the camera, I placed some hazelnuts (one of their favorite foods) in front of the camera. You can do this for lots of different animals, but it is important to remain ethical with your photography and never use live bait. If you need to bait a carnivore, then you can collect road kill for scavengers. Once you’ve found your position, it’s time to set your camera up for action. Connect the trigger and make sure it is working properly. Switch your camera to aperture priority mode, allowing the camera to adapt to changing light conditions – something you can’t do yourself once you’ve stepped away. Make sure your focus is set to manual. You then can adjust the focus yourself, predicting where the animal will turn up. This is the tricky part, as any photo taken without the focus on the eyes will...

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Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 16, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved and used the world over. If you’re in the market it’s $300 off the normal price sitting at $2,499, and can get that here. However, in addition to that you can get this bundle for $2,749 with rebate that includes: Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR Camera Body Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 Lens Canon Speedlite 430EX II Flash Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Professional Photo Inkjet Printer Lowepro Nova Sport 17L AW Shoulder Bag, Slate Gray Sandisk Extreme 32GB microSDHC Class 10 UHS-I Memory Card That’s quite a rounded kit, and not around for long. Get it here while still available. CANON 7D MK II With a 20MP refined APS-C sensor with dual pixel AF, the 7D MK II quickly became an item to get for many pros and enthusiasts. It’s got a rugged shutter designed for 200,000 actuations, a whopping 65 point AF system, and full 1080p at 60FPS. It’s one of the really attractive offerings from Canon and now is $300 less than normal sitting at $1,499 and even bundled with Lightroom. Get it here. Canon 70D We recently featured a Star Wars desert shoot (see here) which has received international attention and the entire shoot was done on a 70D, proving again that it’s a capable, dependable higher-end APS-C DSLR and right now can be had for $999. It’s unlikely this price will drop further anytime in the near future, and it’s a great buy. Get it here. NikoN (Still Offering HUGE SALES ON FX CAMERAS) D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in...

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A Look At The Photography Training & Gear Aboard the ISS With NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams

Posted by on Apr 14, 2016 in Featured, nikon, Photography Tips

A Look At The Photography Training & Gear Aboard the ISS With NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams

When I was a kid, if you asked any one of my classmates what they wanted to be when they grew up, eight out of ten times, you’d hear them say, “astronaut.” This was in the 1980’s when our space program was in full stride – the first space shuttle, Columbia was launched; Sally Ride became the first female in space, and the tragedy of the Challenger was watched on television worldwide. I remember going on a field trip to some long-forgotten museum and buying “Astronaut Ice Cream,” some freeze-dried sugary concoction that, as it turns out, was revealed never even to have been used in space (thanks for shattering my childhood illusions). Every library visit was a race to see who could get to the shelf with books about astronauts and space missions, at recess we’d pretend our jungle gym was a space shuttle, and we were astronauts floating in the dark abyss of the universe. I was the envy of my class when I went to visit Cape Canaveral and the Kennedy Space Center one summer. Alas, neither my classmates nor I actually ended up going into the space program, but we sure knew all about it. We could tell you about the hundreds of hours of training, the various certifications and the various skills astronauts needed to have – one of them being photography. Photography was then and still is now part of the training for all astronauts. One of their training manuals in the 1980’s was a photography manual with all the basics – from changing lenses to proper exposure – created by Hasselblad. The guidebook served to teach astronauts how to use the Hasselblad 500 EL/M cameras that the Space Shuttles were equipped with, but also, how to create “the best possible space photographs.” Now, NASA hires actual photographers to train their astronauts and to choose the equipment needed to capture the images we see from the International Space Station. The astronauts are also trained in a wide variety of photo and video techniques such as live-streaming, 4K video, panoramas, and photo stitching. [REWIND: CHALLENGES & REWARDS OF ASTRONAUT PHOTOGRAPHY WITH DON PETTIT & NASA] In the following video, Astronaut Jeff Williams gives us a look at the gear he uses on the ISS as well as his favorite “view from the office.” Among the equipment on board specifically mentioned are the Nikon D4Ss, and several gigantic $16,000 Nikon 800mm f/5.6 FL ED VR lenses (with a 1.4 teleconverter). Jeff then shows us the view from Cupola of the big blue ball we call home. You can see NASA’s database of images here and on their Instagram account here. Also find Jeff Williams’ personal account and see his adventures on the ISS on his Instagram and Facebook. [Via Inverse; additional info Washington Post]        Share...

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Nikon Full Frame Cameras At Discounts Up to $700, & More Savings From Canon & Sigma (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 10, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Nikon Full Frame Cameras At Discounts Up to $700, & More Savings From Canon & Sigma (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: NikoN D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in a robust body, competitively priced, it’s now an industry staple for many. You can see our full review here, and right now you can score one for $500 off dropping the price from $3,296 to $2,796. It’s the largest savings we’ve seen on the D810 to-date. Get it here. D750 This is the jackknife DSLR at the moment and the one I found almost no fault in when reviewing it (full review here). With its 24MP sensor, low light capability, extended exposure comp, speed, and video capability it made you stop to wonder if you really needed a D810, and if you didn’t need the extra resolution, this was your answer. Typically $2,296, it’s currently going for $1,996 for a $300 break in price. Get it here. D5300 The Nikon D5000 sparked a bit of a small revolution because the series was so small, and so capable, and adopted much from its much larger more expensive brothers. The D5300 is a highly capable camera, and the series is one we refer to in our Photography 101 workshops because they are so good, and for so little. With 39 AF points, 24MP CMOS sensor, built in wi-fi and GPS, no optical low pass filter, and 1080p video at 60fps, it’s impressive. Typically listed at $1,096, it can be had right now for only $796, shaving $300 off the list. Get it here. Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved the world over. It can be found along the sidelines at major sporting events, weddings,...

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Food Photography Tips & ‘How Tos’ From A Young Instagram Dominating Photographer

Posted by on Apr 9, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Fashion, Featured, Food, lightroom, nikon, Photography Tips, photoshop

Food Photography Tips & ‘How Tos’ From A Young Instagram Dominating Photographer

In the same menu, click “Reverse Frames” to obtain the right order. Adjust the timing to your specifications To export: GIF: File >> Export >> Save for Web mp4: File >> Export >> Render Video [REWIND: I know someone who recently compared photographers to possible suitors for dating. She said she has trouble finding someone because people tend to be relatively one-dimensional, or at least easily pigeonholed. He could be handsome and athletic, but then what if he wasn’t funny? The good looking ones rarely are, she claims, “God doesn’t give with both hands.” Now, I don’t know about all that, but it was an interesting comparison because in photography you tend to be defined by what you shoot, and known for that genre: If you’re a fashion photographer you’re typically not considered to cover Wimbledon. Betty Liu, is a bit of an anomaly that way. Her bread and butter is wedding photography, a vocation both she and her husband are accomplished at, but on the side, so-to-speak, she’s a food photographer, and that’s a bit of a problem. So let me swivel the Rubik’s cube of your day and explain how this is odd, and it’s because wedding photographers don’t usually have images on Instagram that get millions of views, and hundreds of thousands of likes – of food. Betty, trailing streamers of success behind her, has managed to not only become great at more than one genre, but to become highly marketable in both. She and I spoke last night about her work, and she’ shared her story, her gear, and how she leveraged Lightroom presets (her own) and a simple technique to gain massive traction. She even breaks down how to do it. Photography Gear Nikon Bodies Mostly (but it changes)Leica M9 Contax 645 Medium Format Film Film Of choice: Fuji 400H Betty’s voice and vocal demeanor are reflective of the presence she has online. She’s soft spoken but well spoken; unpretentious and unassuming; eclectic and unapologetic about it. Perhaps the last part comes from being American of Chinese heritage from California now residing in Boston. A photo posted by betty | (@bliu07) on Mar 9, 2016 at 9:05am PST Her food photography work, however, strikes more a European vibe than American. It’s moody, often dark with soft directional light, and an almost monastic environment. The look of her images is from a Lightroom preset she and her husband created from their experience with wedding photography, and it’s reminiscent of film, as many are. If it’s a look you like the SLR Lounge Preset System can achieve similar results with a single click. In fact, her film of choice is Fuji 400H, and the SLRL system has a 1-click 400H preset. Find it here And as many of you may know, Instagram has been making a major push for video in the last year, introducing view...

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