Nikon D810 For $500 Off, D750 Is $300 Off, 25% Off CreativeLive, & More (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 7, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Nikon D810 For $500 Off, D750 Is $300 Off, 25% Off CreativeLive, & More (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading these words you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them CreativeLive CreativeLive is, for the one or two of you who don’t know, a massive online education powerhouse that broadcasts live classes from leaders in their respective fields all around the world. Those classes span the gamut of the photographic field and cover varying degrees of education for photographers of all levels. Associated with CL are names like Chase Jarvis, Sue Bryce, Zack Arias, and our own Pye Jirsa. SLR Lounge is proud to partner with CreativeLive and offer a new customer promotion offer. Using the code CLNEW20, all new customers will be able to get 20% off your order! There’s never been a better time to tap into what CreativeLive’s got in store, but hurry as the offer for 20% off New Customer Orders expires on April 8th. Gear Deals It’s one of those times where there are huge savings to be had on some of the best and most sought after gear on the market, like the Nikon D810, D750, and a host of other cameras and lenses. Here are some of the very best with the biggest savings. *Keep in mind the deals presented may have varying dates of expiry. NIKON D810 The D810 can surely be called one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in a robust body, competitively priced, it’s now an industry staple for many. You can see our full review here, and right now you can score one for $500 off dropping the price from $3,296 to $2,796. It’s the largest savings we’ve seen on the D810 to-date. Get it here. NIKON D750 This is the jackknife DSLR at the moment and the one I found almost no fault in when reviewing it (full review here). With its 24MP sensor, low light capability, extended exposure comp, speed, and video capability it made you stop to wonder if you really needed a D810, and if you didn’t need the extra resolution, this was your answer. Typically $2,296, it’s currently going for $1,996 for a $300 break in price. Get it here. CANON 50MM F/1.2 Certainly one of the more famous of the Canon lenses, the 50mm f/1.2L gained even more notoriety in the past 2 years as being the go-to lens of wildly successful Humans Of New York photographer...

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5 Tips for Using the Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tool

Posted by on Apr 3, 2016 in Featured, lightroom, macro, Photography Tips, portrait

5 Tips for Using the Lightroom Adjustment Brush Tool

One of Lightroom’s most useful tools is tucked away at the top of the Develop panel, under a rather strange-looking icon that looks like a magic wand from Harry Potter. Clicking this Adjustment Brush icon, gives you access to many of the macro-scale alterations and edits available on some of the other Develop panels, but lets you control them on a micro level. It’s a fantastic tool for editing specific portions of an image, as opposed to the whole picture, but figuring out how to use it can be a bit overwhelming. Here are my five favorite tips and tricks for using the Lightroom Adjustment Brush tool, and hopefully some of these will be useful to you as you explore how to use it for your own editing. 1. Use the A/B brush options to alternate between different types of brushes My wife and I have done a great deal of painting in our house over the years. From hallways, to walkways, to bedrooms, we have spent more time and money on painting than I ever thought possible before we became homeowners. One of the most valuable lessons we have learned is that different types of painting jobs require different brushes. Sometimes you need a large roller, other times you need a small one. Sometimes you need a two-inch angled brush, and other times you need a small foam one. Each brush has its own purpose, and all are required to properly complete a painting task. The same principle holds true in Lightroom, and you often need more than one brush to make the adjustments necessary on a given image. This problem is easily remedied by switching between the A and B brushes near the bottom of the Adjustment Brush panel. Brush A is highlighted by default when you click on the Adjustment Brush panel, which means that any size, feather, flow, mask, and density settings you use will be automatically applied to that brush. When you click on Brush B you can use an entirely different set of options, then cycle between the two brushes just by clicking A and B. In the example above, Brush A is small with a medium feather and flow rate. Brush B is larger with a much lower flow rate and no Auto Mask, which makes it better suited for large-scale edits, whereas Brush A would be better suited for fine-tuning specific parts of an image. Setting up two different brushes is a great way to speed up your editing workflow, since you won’t need to continually change the parameters of a single brush, and you can instantly switch between the brushes by pressing the forward slash (/) key. I used a large brush on the background and a smaller brush on the flower petals, and was able to switch between the two easily to get the edits I needed quickly. 2....

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Weekly Photography Challenge – The Light of Dawn

Posted by on Apr 2, 2016 in Featured, landscape, macro, Photography Tips

Weekly Photography Challenge – The Light of Dawn

This set of images of dawn shared earlier are great examples of using the magic light of dawn to take stunning images. By Susanne Nilsson Weekly Photography Challenge – the light of dawn Your challenge this week is to get up early , get out of your comfy bed, and photograph with the first light of the day, dawn. Sunrise photography can be tricky as you’re usually heading out in the dark. So you may need to plan ahead and scout some locations and shots the night or day before. Get there early so you can capture the first light – it’s magical. Landscapes are the obvious choice for this challenge, but there are so many other subjects you can work with – so think outside the box a little. What about some macro photography? A blade of grass with morning dew, for example. Go urban and hit the city streets to see how the light plays off the buildings and early risers heading to work. There are a ton of possibilities. By Pierre Metivier By Andreas By Joe Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. By Jeff Wallace By 57Andrew The post Weekly Photography Challenge – The Light of Dawn by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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What Gear Do You REALLY Need For Product Photography?

Posted by on Apr 1, 2016 in Fashion, Featured, Food, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, sony

What Gear Do You REALLY Need For Product Photography?

“What gear do you really need for…” articles have proven to be some of my most popular. We all like to read something which challenges the norm, and many of us love a good debate. I also enjoy the challenge of pushing the boundaries, thinking about what the bare minimum gear needed for different genres of photography. This will be my latest “what gear do you really need for…” article and I feel it’s going to be the most challenging. Product photography is potentially the most gear hungry form of photography that I have ventured into. By all means, feel free to rip apart my suggestions; I encourage you to do so. Important Considerations Before We Get Going It’s always important to think about the final product with anything we shoot. With product photography, are you attempting to fill a gigantic billboard and therefore, need a megapixel monster of a camera? Or will your images be used on a website and be no larger than 1000px? As well as the final output of your images, it’s essential with product photography to think about what you are shooting. More specifically, I am referring to the surface; is it reflective or matte? For example, if one was only to be shooting clothing, you could use a very different setup as opposed to someone who was constantly shooting jewelry. Before you spend your hard-earned cash on any piece of equipment, try and think about exactly what you will be photographing. If the answer to that question is potentially anything, then you will need a lot of stuff. If the answer is clothing for e-commerce on a pure white background, then you could get away with very little. I know large companies that use just one light to shoot all of their clothing in a conveyor belt style fashion. [REWIND: USE SPLASH PHOTOGRAPHY TO CREATE STUNNING IMAGES | PHOTIGY COURSE REVIEW] For our purposes today, we’ll focus on someone who wants to shoot a range of items. They’ll differ in size, from jewelry to kitchen appliances, and also have varying surfaces, reflective and matte. The Bread And Butter (AKA Camera Lenses And Tripod) As we all know, there are a ton of options here. I’m not going to take you through every option of camera/lenses and cover the positives and negatives of each. It would take far too long and is quite unnecessary. It boils down to this: for a camera you’ll need a decent number of megapixels (20ish is good) and an ability to trigger external flashes. That covers almost every camera on the market today. Unless you are shooting billboards, you don’t need a huge number of megapixels. Our subjects are generally stationary; therefore, you don’t need an amazing focusing system. As much as possible, you’ll be shooting at ISO 100 and thus do not need fantastic high ISO abilities. My...

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Lighting Setups & Camera Movements For Photographing and Filming Food |The Slanted Lens

Posted by on Mar 27, 2016 in Featured, Food, macro, Photography Tips

Lighting Setups & Camera Movements For Photographing and Filming Food |The Slanted Lens

Everyone is a food photographer these days. At least, that’s what it seems like when I look at Instagram. But a professional food photographer does a bit more than just aim their iPhones at their plates at dinner. Food photography is an art that can involve intricate lighting setups and a sometimes temperamental subject. We discuss the basics of food photography in the macro portion of Photography 101, if you haven’t seen it yet, check it out here or sign up for our SLR Premium to get access to the entire SLR Lounge library. [REWIND: TASTY FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY | HOW TO MAKE YOUR VIEWER’S MOUTH WATER – EBOOK REVIEW] In the following video below, Jay P. Morgan at The Slanted Lens shows you his favorite light setup for food photography as well as a parallax move using a Syrp Genie camera slider for filming food. He begins with setting his light on the top back behind the subject. If you light food straight on, your image will look flat. What makes food photography interesting are the shadows that fall on the delectable delights before you, highlighting certain areas to make them appealing. Jay P. finishes his look by adding some side lights and a reflector to complete his look. In the video, he explains why he sets it up this way. Here is his final light set-up: Because he is filming the subject for a client, Jay P. uses a slider to create camera movement, so the second half of the 9-minute video shows a few techniques you can use for motion. The first is a standard linear movement from left to right; the second is the parallax move which is Jay P.’s favorite. With the parallax technique, the subject is always in the center of the frame while the camera is moving from right to left and the lens is moving left to right giving you a look that’s almost like a carousel. He demonstrates how to do both of these on a Syrp Genie and Genie Mini and gives you examples of when to use both slider techniques. It’s a great little video that will probably make you really hungry.        Share...

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Weekly Photography Challenge – The Humble Vegetable

Posted by on Mar 26, 2016 in Featured, macro, Photography Tips

Weekly Photography Challenge – The Humble Vegetable

Earlier we looked at some artsy images of everyday objects – vegetables. By Williamo! Weekly Photography Challenge – the humble vegetable This week we want you to go find some produce and photograph it! Think outside the box: Try black and white Shoot macro Go for an abstract Backlight it Light paint it By samandel.com By Flavio~ By Lynn Friedman By Amelia Crook By woodleywonderworks By Tristan Bowersox By Gillie Rhodes By Tim Geers By jar [] Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. By David Reber The post Weekly Photography Challenge – The Humble Vegetable by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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