landscape

Landscape photography shows spaces within the world, sometimes vast and unending, but other times microscopic. Landscape photographs typically capture the presence of nature but can also focus on man-made features or disturbances of landscapes.

10 Tips for Photographing Wide-Angle Landscapes

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in Featured, landscape, Photography Tips

10 Tips for Photographing Wide-Angle Landscapes

A wide-angle lens is considered an essential piece of gear for any landscape photographer because it gives you a perspective that you cannot achieve with any other lens. You’ll not only be able to photograph grand vistas, but you’ll see lines in a different way, and emphasize subjects by getting super close. So if you haven’t tried one yet, borrow or rent a wide angle lens and get ready to make images with a different flavour using these tips. 21mm, ISO 100, f/18, 1/15 second What is a wide-angle lens? Camera lenses are defined by comparison to the field of view that the eye naturally sees – which is 50mm on a full frame camera or 35mm on a crop sensor camera. This is known as a normal focal length. Any wider than that is a considered wide-angle. My favourite wide-angle lens is in the 10-20mm range on my crop sensor camera, or 16-35mm on a full frame camera. When to use a wide-angle lens Many people think the purpose of a wide-angle lens is to photograph grand vistas and get a lot in the frame. While that is one purpose for a wide-angle lens, its real power is in using its perspective to emphasize objects that are very close to you and de-emphasizing objects that are farther away. 1. Emphasize a foreground element Wide-angle lenses allow you to get really close to something in the foreground, which will emphasize it and make it look larger and more important than the background elements. A wide lens has a way of changing the relative size of the objects in the frame, so that things that are closer to the lens appear larger, and things in the background appear smaller proportionally. 20mm, ISO 200. f/5.6, 1/160 second Try using a low angle and getting very close to your main subject. By close, I mean inches away. You’ll be surprised when you look through the viewfinder and discover that objects don’t appear quite so close through the lens. 2. Photograph your subject and its environment My favourite way to use the lens is to get very close to my main subject so it is large in the frame, as mentioned above, but also include other elements in its environment in the frame. This is a great way to create a story-telling image that provides context for the main subject. 16mm, ISO 200, f/8, 1.3 seconds 3. Get everything in focus Another great power of a wide-angle lens is its ability to have incredible depth of field. You can get everything from two feet away to infinity in focus. Of course, this depends on the exact lens and the aperture you choose, but all wide-angle lenses have a greater ability to get more in focus than a telephoto lens (which is excellent at shallow depth of field by blurring the background). You’d be...

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25 Stunning Photos of City Skylines

Posted by on Apr 16, 2016 in Featured, landscape, Photography Tips

25 Stunning Photos of City Skylines

Urban landscape photography, pretty much involves city skyline images. Iconic shots of skylines and many cities of the world are instantly recognizable. See if you find these images inspiring, and if you can name the cities: By Anh Dinh By olsonj By Viisoreanu Florin Gabriel By Chris Toe Pher By Matt Paish By Mike Boening Photography By Michaela Loheit By yooperann By Miroslav Petrasko By Maciek Lulko By Miroslav Petrasko By whereisemil By Herr Olsen By Giuseppe Milo By Aurimas By Jamie McCaffrey By Ram Balmur By RobinTphoto By Peter Hubler By Gordon By Dave Wilson By Gord McKenna By hopeless128 By Loïc Lagarde By Siyamalan The post 25 Stunning Photos of City Skylines by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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Beginner’s Guide to Buying Filters

Posted by on Apr 15, 2016 in Featured, landscape, Photography Tips

Beginner’s Guide to Buying Filters

Neutral density filters help you achieve extreme long exposures, while graduated neutral density filters help balance exposure between a bright sky and a dark foreground. Both were used in this image. The exposure time was three minutes. For most photographers, their first experience with a filter is when it is suggested they purchase a UV or Skylight filter to protect their lens. It’s usually much later that beginning photographers find out about the other filters available to them, and what they can be used for. Once you’ve decided to add a filter or filters to your camera bag, however, you’ll be faced with a myriad of choices regarding the various brands, materials, and types of filters that are available to you. Many times, the gut instinct is to purchase the cheapest filter that will do the job. The reality is, however, that there are many factors to consider when purchasing a filter, and buying the cheapest one on the rack that does what you want, it to is not usually a good idea. There is often a difference in the quality of the materials used, even when both filters appear to be made of the same things. In An Introduction to Filters for DSLRs, you’ll find a breakdown of the different kinds of filters, and their uses. Here, I’d like to try and demystify the differences between filters, and why similar looking filters might have drastically different price points. Screw-in versus drop-in filters First of all, there are two basic types of filters: screw-in and drop-in. The former mount directly onto the lens via the threads on the front, whereas the latter drop-in type are square or rectangular in shape, and require a filter holder and mounting ring that attaches to the front of the lens. Certain types of filters are available as both a screw-in and drop-in filter. Screw-in filters are constructed of glass with a metal ring. The quality of the glass can vary, even within the same brand, depending on whether you’re going with a high end filter or a value priced one. The metal of the ring can vary as well, as they can be made of brass or aluminum. Cheaper filters usually have an aluminum ring. It’s a soft metal that is more easily dented if dropped, or bent if put under pressure. This could cause the filter to jam when mounting it to your lens. The most popular screw-in filters tend to be polarizers, UV, and neutral density filters. The other type is what’s known as a drop-in filter. These are square or rectangular pieces of glass that are typically inserted in a holder that is mounted onto the lens. Often, the holder, or mounting ring, can also accommodate a screw-in polarizing filter, as well as two or three drop-in filters in front of that, allowing you to combine the effects of a...

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10 Ideas to Instantly Improve Your Photography Composition

Posted by on Apr 14, 2016 in Featured, landscape, Photography Tips

10 Ideas to Instantly Improve Your Photography Composition

It is an illusion that photos are made with the camera; they are made with the eye, heart and head. – Henri Cartier-Bresson My photography training took place back in the early 90s, at an intense technical photo school in California. I love tech in all forms, and I love reading my camera manual. I love the precision and procedure of processing my own colour film, and I love learning the ever-advancing skills on photo software – I am a total tech nerd. But technical knowledge will only get you so far; it’s really the second part of the story in photography. Photography composition is the first part. The first part is your vision of what you want your photography to be, and learning the ability to compose compelling images. Your technical knowledge will only give you the ability to execute your vision, and make the most of the composition that you have created. It can’t replace the ability to see and to compose stunning compositions. So all things should flow from a good composition. And when we are learning about composition I like to keep in mind that quote that may or may not have been spoken by Picasso (it’s under dispute on the internet): “Learn the rules like a pro and break them like an artist.” Rules, guidelines, ideas about composition will give you a place to start, help develop your skills and propel you out of a rut. But they should not be followed slavishly or forever. Here are my ideas on what you can do to make your compositions more captivating. But, bear in mind that creating totally unique compositions comes down to creating your own style . So don’t be swayed too much by other photographers’ advice on this subject. Photography is an examination of the world through your eyes, it’s totally subjective, totally about connecting with what inspires and excites you. Just pick up ideas that make sense and motivate you. To practice, pick one concept from below that jumps out. Don’t take all these ideas and try to incorporate them into your photography all at once. Pick one and really embrace it – then the results will come. So here are my 10 favourite tips on how you can instantly improve your composition. 1. Light “Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography.” George Eastman For me more than anything, photography is about light, and learning to identify interesting light is one of the best skills to learn. Light that is doing something interesting, or is beautiful or colourful; will take a good subject and turn it into something completely amazing. Light is my starting point when I am taking photos. It is the thing I consider first, and what affects...

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How To Take The Perfect Sunset Photo

Posted by on Apr 14, 2016 in Featured, landscape, Photography Tips, portrait

How To Take The Perfect Sunset Photo

Want to know how to capture beautiful sunset images? We’ve got you covered. Take your sunset images from ordinary to extraordinary with just a few simple tips on exposure, color, & composition! Click to Subscribe! Understanding Exposure Your exposure will be determined by where the sun is in the sky – the higher the sun, the brighter the sky. The best way to expose for your sunset is by using your histogram, which shows you the overall luminosity or brightness in the scene. The histogram will become your best friend when it comes to understanding exposure while shooting landscape photography. Colourful Sunsets The longer you wait for the sun to set, the more vibrant the colors will be. When the sun gets low in the sky, we witness an effect called scattering. Some of the sun’s rays travel a further distance and hit more atmospheric particles causing rich & colorful sunsets comprised of a variety of colors. The combination of patience and the right exposure settings will result in a gloriously painted sky. Composition of the Sun Whatever you do, try to stay clear of bullseye-ing your sun! Think of it like any other subject in portrait photography and use the rule of thirds, or other compositional theories to help add interest to the final image. Take a step back and ask yourself what the most exciting part of the image is, and focus on creatively capturing that. Conclusion Understanding these 3 key components of how to capture the perfect sunset image will take your photos to new heights. When you master the technical aspects of exposure, then you can move on to the artistic aspects of photography. If you’re interested in learning more about photography then be sure to check out Photography 101, the best way to learn photography! Gain access to this workshop and so much more by purchasing a Premium Subscription to SLR Lounge!        Share...

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Step by Step How to Use HDR Merge in Lightroom

Posted by on Apr 13, 2016 in Featured, landscape, lightroom, Photography Tips

Step by Step How to Use HDR Merge in Lightroom

There are lots of plug-ins that you can use with Lightroom to create High Dynamic Range (HDR) images. Photomatix and HDR Efex Pro are two of the best known, and MacPhun’s Aurora HDR (Mac only) is a new application that has received good reviews. But, if you have Lightroom 6 or CC, you can create HDR images right within Lightroom itself, without having to buy a plug-in. There are several advantages to using Lightroom for your HDR conversions: You save money. Most HDR plug-ins are not free, and are an additional cost for you. Lightroom’s HDR merge creates natural looking HDR images. Not everybody will see this as an advantage – but if you want to create garish, over-saturated images the aforementioned plug-ins will help. You don’t need a lot of bracketed images. Two seem to be enough (you can use more if you want, or if you have a really contrasty scene), one exposed at -2 stops, the other at +2 stops. The final HDR image is saved as a DNG file. Not only is this smaller than a TIFF file, but you can process it in Lightroom the same as you do with any other DNG or Raw file. The main difference is that the Exposure slider runs from -10 to + 10 stops, rather than the normal -4 to +4. There is also much more information in the file for Lightroom to work with, when you make adjustments with the Shadows and Highlights sliders (and local adjustment tools like the Graduated and Radial filters). You can take bracketed sequences hand-held, and Lightroom will align them automatically. Having said that, I’ve found the best results come from bracketed photos taken with a tripod mounted camera. There is less noise in shadow areas than you would expect from a regular, single photo. Lightroom HDR merge in action Let’s look at a couple of practical examples to see how it performs. Start in Grid View in the Library module, and select the images you want to merge. Alternatively, you can select the images in the Filmstrip in the Develop module. Then, go to Photo > Photo Merge > HDR. Or, right-click on one of the selected photos and select Photo Merge >HDR. The HDR Merge Preview window opens, and Lightroom creates a preview of the HDR image. This may take some time, especially if you have selected several images. The Auto Align and Auto Tone boxes are ticked, and the Deghost Amount is set to None, by default. Lightroom remembers the last settings used, if you have changed them. Auto Align is useful if the camera moved between exposures (for example if you hand-held the camera) and Auto Tone performs a similar function to the Auto Tone settings in the Basic Panel of the Develop module. I find HDR merge works best with the Auto Align and Auto Tone...

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