10 Ways to Improve your Vacation Photos

Posted by on Mar 9, 2014 in General, landscape

10 Ways to Improve your Vacation Photos

This has probably happened to all of us. We’ve just come back from an exciting trip and want to share all the wonderful moments with our friends and family. But after a brief moment we seem to be the only ones still enjoying the picture-show. Everyone else has quickly lost interest. So what can we do to stop putting people to sleep with our vacation photos? Here are some tips to help you take vacation photos that everybody will love. It’s easier than you might think, and it definitely doesn’t require expensive equipment. Keeping in mind some basic rules, you can take stunning images even with your mobile phone. Let me take you to Paris and show you how with these 10 ways to improve your vacation photos: #1 – Don’t rush – take your time It often happens that you get to a beautiful place and start photographing right away. But wait. Unless it’s a sunset or fast moving group of people, nothing is going to run away from you. Instead take your time to wander around a little bit sucking up the atmosphere. Here’s an example. Last month I went to Paris. When I got off the metro and the Eiffel Tower appeared, I was immediately tempted to take a picture. Actually everybody around me started shooting right away. I decided to stroll around first. In my mind I was framing, but I left my camera in the bag. This slow approach helped me to get a feeling for the place and to figure out what it was that I wanted to capture. #2 – Reflections Avoid the obvious. When everybody is looking in one direction, look the other way. You may be surprised what you’ll find: impressive reflections, for example. This is a great way to show a familiar sight in a new light – such as the Eiffel Tower. The giant monument can be seen from almost every point in downtown Paris. It is reflected in car windows or in water puddles at night. The distortions add a sense of humour or even mysteriousness. Those viewing the image can quickly identify what’s in the photo, yet the unfamiliar perspective puzzles them. #3 – Tilt your camera When taking a picture of a sunset, the horizon should be straight. But when it comes to buildings, it’s perfectly all right to tilt your camera to create a new angle. Don’t be afraid, not everything has to be placed perfectly aligned in the center of the frame. Just don’t do it part way. If you opt for an uncommon perspective, do it all the way. That is to say let the observer understand that you tilted the camera on purpose, and that the building is not accidentally inclined either to the left or right. #4 – Incorporate the surroundings When sightseeing we are never alone. There will always...

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4 Tips for Post Processing Efficiency in Photoshop

Posted by on Mar 9, 2014 in General, lightroom, photoshop

4 Tips for Post Processing Efficiency in Photoshop

A great deal of post processing can be done in Photoshop, more than most photographers realize actually. As a designer, I didn’t have Lightroom, and just wanted to adjust my photos to look a little nicer, little did I know the power behind Photoshop and its post processing capabilities. Today I am going to give you some tips and tricks I learned that increased my efficiency within Photoshop. 1 – Photoshop Layout and Organization The first way to increase efficiency before doing any photo editing, is to organize and optimize your Photoshop layout. Setting up and customizing your Photoshop layout is key to configuring exactly how you want your panels and canvas to look. It is also very easy to do, and can improve your workflow a lot. Here are a few things to keep in mind when editing your Photoshop layout. Only keep the necessary, delete all panels that are superfluous to your photo editing process. They really just get in the way and clutter your workspace. Organize your panels based on your workflow. Keeping certain windows paired will help you work faster and make adjusting much easier. Adjust spacing and panels so you can have the largest size available for your image. Here is a quick preview of my layout, in case you need some inspiration. After you carefully adjust and tweak the panels to perfection, it is really simple to save your workspace. Simply go to the top right corner of your Photoshop Document, where is says Mike’s Workspace in the image above, and click to activate the drop-down menu. Then click new workspace and you can save it as your very own Photoshop layout. You can even save shortcuts and menus within the layout. 2 – The Basic Effects Now that you’ve organized your layout, it’s time to start editing your photos. When I start editing any photo I have a few basic steps I do religiously. These don’t have to be the same for you, and it is totally ok to completely disregard them (or come up with your own), but it is sort of a habit that can help contribute to your photography style. The first small task I complete is duplicating the image layer. To ensure I don’t damage my original photo. From there I add a few subtle Adjustment Layers to balance the light in the image. It looks something like the image below. The above effect is a simple curves adjustment that helps balance light and tone down the colors in a subtle manner. After that I mess with the brightness and contrast just a little bit to get the image looking clean and balanced (as an Adjustment Layer as shown below). Consider all the above steps as precursory steps to the actual photo editing process. These are simply done to balance light, prevent error, and it is like a...

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Weekly Photography Challenge – Fast Cars

Posted by on Mar 8, 2014 in General

Weekly Photography Challenge – Fast Cars

Now that I have your attention you might be able to guess what this week’s photograph challenge is right? Weekly photography challenge – fast cars! You may be thinking, “I don’t live near a race track”, so I’m way ahead of you. Just to clarify this challenge a little, the goal is to make the cars look like they are going fast. They don’t actually have to be doing so! How to add motion So how do you add motion to your car images? One way is panning. Another is to shoot from inside a moving car – just please make sure you are NOT the driver! Safety first. Here’s some tips if you need a hand: Showing Speed: Using Panning When Shooting Action 13 Places to Practice Taking Beautiful Motion Blur Shots Mastering Panning – Photographing Moving Subjects 3 Tips for Creating Dramatic Images using Motion By Takashi Hososhima By Brian Gaid By Jim Sher Share your fast car images! Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section as pictured below) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Fast Cars by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.      Share...

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35 Moving Images of Speeding Cars

Posted by on Mar 8, 2014 in General

35 Moving Images of Speeding Cars

Last week I shared some great images of boats, so I thought I’d continue with the transportation theme and take a look at some images of speeding cars. Fast cars! In fact, some are so fast they didn’t even show up in the image! You figure that one out. I love shooting cars by panning to create some motion. Having just been in Havana, Cuba classic cars were in abundance. Enjoy these images of fast cars. By Moyan Brenn By Paco CT By Ernest By Ian Sane By Nathan E Photography By Trey Ratcliff By Ian Sane By Romain Ballez By Om By Digimist By dez&john3313 By Fabio Aro By Caitlin H By Chris Smith By Luis Miguel Justino By Ville Miettinen By Dustin Spengler By William Cho By Derek Walker Photo (Derk Photography) By Pedro Szekely By Donnie Nunley By Mohammed Nairooz By Patrick Mayon By Jim Monk By hjhipster By bkdc By Dave Wilson By Eric Castro By Nick Wheeler By Fabio Aro By drpavloff By Derek Walker Photo (Derk Photography) By Didier Baertschiger By YackNonch By Nick Kenrick For some car photography tips check out: 7 Tips for Taking Better Photographs of Cars The post 35 Moving Images of Speeding Cars by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.      Share...

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SensorKlear Loupe Kit Review

Posted by on Mar 7, 2014 in General, lightroom

SensorKlear Loupe Kit Review

The SensorKlear Loupe Kit from LensPen. A couple of years ago, I decided it was time to face my fears head-on. Since the day I had unboxed my first DSLR I’d fallen victim to all of the various doomsday warnings about the horrors that could befall me if something went wrong while cleaning my sensor. Don’t get me wrong– those warnings are all valid. Messing this up could scratch the sensor, push it out of alignment, or even break it, just to name a few. I’d always figured that if something was going to go wrong, I wanted it to be someone else’s fault– someone who would have to pay to replace the camera or repair the damage. Luckily, I have a great local camera shop that offers sensor cleaning twice a month and does a great job, but I finally got to that “how-hard-can-it-be?” point and decided it was time to learn. DOOMSDAY WARNING: I would be totally remiss if I didn’t offer my own caution flag. If any part of cleaning your own sensor makes you the slightest bit uncomfortable, you should absolutely not do it. The consequences I mentioned above are only a few of the things that can happen if this delicate task is done incorrectly. There are a lot of products out there to help you clean your sensor, some better than others. You should thoroughly research any product before sticking it into your camera. Also make sure that it comes with clear, easy-to-follow instructions. The SensorKlear Loupe Kit comes from the same company that manufactures the LensPen–one of my favourite lens-cleaning tools. The sensor-cleaning kit contains three components. The SensorKlear Loupe, the LensPen Hurricane Blower, and the SensorKlear II Pen. The Loupe For me, the biggest drawback to most sensor-cleaning products is that you really can’t see what you’re doing. The SensorKlear Loupe changes that, providing an illuminated, magnified view of the sensor. Being able to quickly and easily detect sensor dust not only makes the task of cleaning it easier, but also tells you whether your sensor even needs cleaning at all. There’s no sense sticking anything in your camera unnecessarily. The loupe is also designed with an opening on the side, allowing access for the cleaning tools while maintaining your view of the sensor. The loupe uses two AAA batteries (included) and fits perfectly over the camera opening. Be sure to check your camera’s owner’s manual for instructions on locking the mirror in the “up” position for sensor cleaning. The Blower Chances are you probably already have a similar blower in your gear bag, so I’m not going to take up a lot of your time describing this one. It’s a blower–plain and simple. By now I’m sure you know to not let canned air anywhere near your sensor. The velocity of the air can blow the sensor out of alignment...

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Pro Tog, Cheap Camera Challenge – Ben Von Wong

Posted by on Mar 2, 2014 in General

Pro Tog, Cheap Camera Challenge – Ben Von Wong

http://ift.tt/1bVlKpG Pro Tog, Cheap Camera Challenge – Ben Von Wong You know the score: we take one cheap camera and challenge one professional photographer to do a photoshoot with it. In this episode, see what Toronto-based photographer Benjamin Von Wong can… From: DigitalRev TV Views: 0 0 ratings Time: 14:41 More in Science & Technology Vía Uploads by DigitalRev TV http://ift.tt/1bVlK9q Share...

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