Food

Food photography is a specialized commercial photography aimed at capturing images of foods for several advertising purposes in menus, cookbooks or packaging. This can be regarded as one of the easiest form of photographic genre where several amateur photographers are interested. Highly commercial and time aesthetic comes synonymous to food photography. However, it needs some skills of presenting the varieties of products in an appealing way. Colorful stacks of drizzled vegetables or fruits with a glistening table setting- get the perfect focus; people love everything that is displayed amazingly clean and excellent.

Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Food, Photography Tips, portrait

Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography

In my career as a photographer I’ve covered many genres from studio product photography, editorial, industrial, food photography, weddings, portraits, fine art, and travel – but through all of that, I’m primarily a people photographer. I like to photograph people. Shoe repair man in Nicaragua – By Darlene Hildebrandt Model at sunset – By Darlene Hildebrandt Cuban beauties – By Darlene Hildebrandt Whether it’s in a studio environment doing a posed portrait, a candid doing street photography, a shop owner or vendor in a foreign country – people are always interesting and challenging to photograph. Weekly Photography Challenge – People We’ve got lots of articles to help you as you go about photographing people this week in fact it’s our feature topic right now. You can see all the ones we’ve done so far this week below, and watch for more people photography articles over the next few days: How to Take Low Key Head-shots How to Do a One Light Portrait Setup and Use it as Your Back-up Plan Travel People Photography – Tips and Pitfalls 8 Tips for Photographing Men 24 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography Nicaraguan school kids – By Darlene Hildebrandt Wedding fun – By Darlene Hildebrandt Cuban dancers – By Darlene Hildebrandt You can also check out our ebooks on people and portrait photography: Fast Flash for Portrait Perfection Portraits: Lighting the Shot Portraits: Making the Shot Portraits: Striking the Pose Kids Photography So if you are not inclined to photograph people and this challenges makes you a bit nervous – maybe now is the time to get out of your comfort zone and just do it. I promise they won’t bite! Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. You can see some of mine here on this page – now it’s your turn to share, and show me your people photos. The post Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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Family Photography: Documenting An ‘Unconventional’ Childhood In A Modern Era

Posted by on Apr 18, 2016 in canon, Featured, Food, Photography Tips

Family Photography: Documenting An ‘Unconventional’ Childhood In A Modern Era

Quick, name five things you loved to do as a child (Mine were to read, roller skate, play with my friends, trade Garbage Pail Kids, and cuddle my puppy). If you’d ask my preteen daughter the same question, good luck, because she’s either busy on her phone texting her friends or on her laptop as many her age are doing. Childhood, as we knew it, has evolved into a generation of kids attached to their gadgets and do little more than grunt when you direct a question their way. Gone are the days where children were outside all day, using their imaginations and creativity to fuel their play. Not wanting that lifestyle for her own family and children, photographer Niki Boon moved her family to a rural 10-acre property in New Zealand. Choosing an “unconventional” lifestyle, Niki and her family live off their land and her children are homeschooled. A few years ago, while working as a Physiotherapist, Niki found her passion for photography in the darkroom, and then again after she quit her job as her children were born. In an article featuring her work in NatGeo, Niki explains, “My mother died when I was young, and now I have just a couple of small albums of faded but highly treasured six-by-four photos to tell my childhood stories. It is my passion to record as much as I can of my children’s day-to-day lives, as well as their adventures, in the most meaningful pictures I can take … their stories, our stories, and a piece of me. They’re for them to enjoy and relive for years to come.” And so is the basis of her current project, ‘Childhood in the Raw,’ family photography with the focus being on her family. Niki spends her days documenting her four children as they frolic in nature and living “life as it is.” For her, photographing them is a reflection of her own childhood, a nostalgic and sincere place of freedom, as she describes it. Niki captures moments where they are covered in mud, running free and wild, playing, and exploring. Her deeply personal family photographs are not only nostalgic for her, she believes that viewers will be reminded of aspects of their own childhood. With their rural life tending to animals, farming for their food, and the carefree simplicity of just being children, Niki is hoping to just “celebrate the magical place” that she chooses to live with her family and document it all along the way. Niki shoots with a Canon 5D Mark III and a 35mm 2.0 lens. Her post processing is simple with a few VSCO presets and “tweaks here and there.” You can see more of Niki Boon’s work on her website, Facebook, Instagram, and 500px. [Via Bored Panda]       Share...

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Wildlife Photography With A Wide-Angle Lens For Impact| Getting Your Subject & The Surroundings

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in canon, Featured, Food, nikon, Photography Tips, Wildlife

Wildlife Photography With A Wide-Angle Lens For Impact| Getting Your Subject & The Surroundings

Capturing wildlife with a telephoto lens is the technique of ‘traditional’ wildlife photography. It’s still commonplace and most certainly has its place, with many incredible photos taken using that approach. But put down your telephoto in exchange for a wide-angle lens and you’ll open the door to a whole new perspective with your wildlife photography. It may seem challenging, and to some degree it is, but once you are used to the technique it is not necessarily more difficult than using a telephoto – the results, of course, are just different. My lens of choice for this was a Nikon 14mm f/2.8, although I have since sold it and replaced it with a Nikon 18-35mm lens. I preferred the flexibility of a zoom lens rather than a prime. Equipment You’ll Need Aside from your DSLR and a wide-angle lens, you’re going to need a few more pieces of equipment. Joby Focus Gorillapod – This flexible tripod allows you to position your camera low to the ground in all sorts of terrains. YongNuo Shutter Release – These wireless shutter releases are cheap and robust. They work over radio signals, meaning they don’t need line-of-sight to activate your camera’s trigger. They have a range of up to 100 meters too, allowing you to stand at a distance and remotely trigger your camera. Setting Up Your Photo Think about what you’re trying to achieve here. The advantage of the wide-angle lens is the ability to introduce the surroundings into your photo. You are able to document the animal and its environment simultaneously, something that isn’t always possible with a telephoto lens. Positioning the camera as low to the ground as possible gives the unique perspective, and being below the eye-level of an subject makes the viewer feel smaller than the animal, turning our expectations of wildlife photography on its head. You can see in the above image that I’ve chosen to include the woodland surroundings of this red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris). To get the squirrel to come close to the camera, I placed some hazelnuts (one of their favorite foods) in front of the camera. You can do this for lots of different animals, but it is important to remain ethical with your photography and never use live bait. If you need to bait a carnivore, then you can collect road kill for scavengers. Once you’ve found your position, it’s time to set your camera up for action. Connect the trigger and make sure it is working properly. Switch your camera to aperture priority mode, allowing the camera to adapt to changing light conditions – something you can’t do yourself once you’ve stepped away. Make sure your focus is set to manual. You then can adjust the focus yourself, predicting where the animal will turn up. This is the tricky part, as any photo taken without the focus on the eyes will...

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How to Decide What Gear to Pack for a Wilderness Trip

Posted by on Apr 11, 2016 in Featured, Food, landscape, Photography Tips, portrait, Wildlife

How to Decide What Gear to Pack for a Wilderness Trip

Each year, I spend many weeks guiding, and exploring, in the mountains and rivers of Alaska. The trips are a mishmash of different adventures; base-camp trips, mellow canoe trips, backpacks over rugged terrain and high peaks, or multi-day whitewater rafting trips. One thing that always plays a part, no matter what type of journey I’m taking, is photography. The gear however, varies. Different types of trips demand different kinds of equipment, and there are a number of things that need to be taken into consideration. For me, photo equipment decisions are a multi-step process, and there are a few things to consider. Here are three and my tips at the end for packing a kit. #1 – Weight Limitations A DeHaviland Beaver, the classic Alaska bush plane, on a riverside gravel bar in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska. This is a constant in the backcountry. Weight is always, ALWAYS an issue. On backpacking trips, every ounce of camera gear has to be added to clothing, tents, food, cookware, and safety equipment that cannot be left behind. When I’m guiding backpacking trips in Alaska’s wilderness, this can mean that on top of my usual backpacking gear, I also have an expedition first aid kit, satellite phone, ground to air radio, and more than my own share of food. My pack is heavy, long before I add camera gear. Making sure that anything extra is as light as possible, is my priority. Sometimes you can carry a lot of gear, as you can see from this camp along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, but even here every pound has to be loaded and unloaded daily. Other types of trips are not as restrictive, but weight is always a concern. Most of the trips I lead involve small bush planes to get to and from our start and end points. These tiny aircraft have limits on the amount of weight that be carried. So even it’s a rafting trip where there is plenty of space in the boats, the number of pounds of excess gear is still a concern. Even photography-specific trips are limited. Any time you are in the backcountry, you will have to carry your gear, so it’s got to be compact and light enough that you can get it where it needs to go, quickly, and without fuss. I often find it helpful to run the numbers. How many pounds of total gear can I handle? For example, on backpacking trips I know that the most weight I can carry comfortably for extended periods without risking injury is around 70 lbs (31.75 kg). If non-photography gear weighs 60 (27.2 kg), then I’ve got 10 (4.5 kg) to play with (though I’m always happier with less!). For the guided trips I lead, we set a weight limit on our clients which is necessary to keep our cargo...

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Food Photography Tips & ‘How Tos’ From A Young Instagram Dominating Photographer

Posted by on Apr 9, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Fashion, Featured, Food, lightroom, nikon, Photography Tips, photoshop

Food Photography Tips & ‘How Tos’ From A Young Instagram Dominating Photographer

In the same menu, click “Reverse Frames” to obtain the right order. Adjust the timing to your specifications To export: GIF: File >> Export >> Save for Web mp4: File >> Export >> Render Video [REWIND: I know someone who recently compared photographers to possible suitors for dating. She said she has trouble finding someone because people tend to be relatively one-dimensional, or at least easily pigeonholed. He could be handsome and athletic, but then what if he wasn’t funny? The good looking ones rarely are, she claims, “God doesn’t give with both hands.” Now, I don’t know about all that, but it was an interesting comparison because in photography you tend to be defined by what you shoot, and known for that genre: If you’re a fashion photographer you’re typically not considered to cover Wimbledon. Betty Liu, is a bit of an anomaly that way. Her bread and butter is wedding photography, a vocation both she and her husband are accomplished at, but on the side, so-to-speak, she’s a food photographer, and that’s a bit of a problem. So let me swivel the Rubik’s cube of your day and explain how this is odd, and it’s because wedding photographers don’t usually have images on Instagram that get millions of views, and hundreds of thousands of likes – of food. Betty, trailing streamers of success behind her, has managed to not only become great at more than one genre, but to become highly marketable in both. She and I spoke last night about her work, and she’ shared her story, her gear, and how she leveraged Lightroom presets (her own) and a simple technique to gain massive traction. She even breaks down how to do it. Photography Gear Nikon Bodies Mostly (but it changes)Leica M9 Contax 645 Medium Format Film Film Of choice: Fuji 400H Betty’s voice and vocal demeanor are reflective of the presence she has online. She’s soft spoken but well spoken; unpretentious and unassuming; eclectic and unapologetic about it. Perhaps the last part comes from being American of Chinese heritage from California now residing in Boston. A photo posted by betty | (@bliu07) on Mar 9, 2016 at 9:05am PST Her food photography work, however, strikes more a European vibe than American. It’s moody, often dark with soft directional light, and an almost monastic environment. The look of her images is from a Lightroom preset she and her husband created from their experience with wedding photography, and it’s reminiscent of film, as many are. If it’s a look you like the SLR Lounge Preset System can achieve similar results with a single click. In fact, her film of choice is Fuji 400H, and the SLRL system has a 1-click 400H preset. Find it here And as many of you may know, Instagram has been making a major push for video in the last year, introducing view...

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8 Tips for Food Photography Newbies

Posted by on Apr 8, 2016 in Featured, Food, lightroom, Photography Tips

8 Tips for Food Photography Newbies

Making food look appetizing, is not quite as simple as photographing your plate. There are a number of tricks that you can use to really enhance the subject. By using your camera creatively, you can capture the scrumptious side of food. Whether it’s your favorite dessert, or a full meal, these tips will help take your food photography to the next level. 8 Tips for Food Photography Newbies 1) Use a very shallow depth of field When you’re about to take a photo, the first technical question you want to ask is, “What kind of background would be best?” With food photography, you typically only want a sliver of the subject sharp, and the rest of the plate to be a soft blur. To do this, choose the widest aperture your lens allows. At f/2.8 the opening in your lens is physically wide open, creating what’s known as shallow depth of field. If you’re using a kit lens, the effect will be enhanced if you use your lens at a longer focal length, and get closer to the food. 2) Less is more By N i c o l a By Irudayam? While looking at the scene through your camera, ask yourself, “What’s really the subject here?” This simple question will help to shape your composition. While this may seem rudimentary at first, the impact is undeniable once applied. For a helpful reminder, consider taping a small note to the inside of your lens cap. Check all four corners of the frame carefully. Anything that does not work towards emphasizing the chosen subject should be eliminated. The goal is to create a clean frame as opposed to visual clutter. 3) Design your composition Think beyond the obvious subject, and consider shape and form when crafting your composition. Adding a knife for instance, can balance a composition if placed in the rule of thirds. By shooting from directly overhead you create an elegant frame. In the image above, the towel in the left hand corner adds a pop of color, while the parsley, lime and avocado all add various shades of green. To add more shine to your silverware or reflective objects, in this case the knife, use a reflector board to bounce in extra light. 4) Get messy By tracy benjamin By Stefano To make your food photography look real and not staged, try adding crumbs to the set. This imperfection may seem odd at first, but it adds visual appeal. A bit of cheese sprinkled over the plate is an easy way to accomplish this. A little bit goes a long way here, so be subtle with your approach. 5) Use a high ISO Simply put, the higher the ISO number is, the faster light can get into the camera. At ISO 800 you will get light into the camera faster than you would at ISO 100 or...

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