How a Short Versus Long Exposure Will Affect Your Landscape Images

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How a Short Versus Long Exposure Will Affect Your Landscape Images

The shutter speed is probably the factor which has the greatest impact on an image. By adjusting the exposure time by only a few stops, you’re able to completely change the appearance of an image. But what exposure time is best for landscape photography? Should you use a long exposure or should you work with shorter ones? When will adjusting the shutter speed have the greatest impact? In this article, I’ll share three case studies where I compare how adjusting the shutter speed has impacted the final images. I don’t believe that either is better than the other (in each case) but it’s important that you’re aware of the differences so it becomes easier to convey the story or emotions you desire. What is a Long Exposure? I’ve had many discussions with fellow photographers regarding the exact definition of Long Exposure. At first thought, most consider a long exposure to be an image where the clouds are dragged across the sky or moving water looks like silk or ice. However, this is judging solely based on the visual aspect of the image. Is it not still considered a long exposure if you don’t see its effect? Wouldn’t a 20-second exposure be 20 seconds no matter what? The definition most of my photography friends have agreed upon is that a long exposure begins when you can’t take a sharp image handheld. Normally, this is at about 1/50th of a second with a wide angle lens. Using a tripod makes it possible to have a longer exposure. Case Study #1 – Waterfalls Waterfalls are often ideal to start experimenting with long exposures. Since the water is moving quickly, you don’t need an extremely long exposure just to capture some motion. In fact, you’ll need a very quick shutter speed to avoid capturing any motion at all. The choice of shutter speed has an extremely high impact on the image. You might not even need a filter to begin capturing the motion of water in your shots. However, I find waterfalls to be tricky to photograph at times because of this. The different shutter speeds have such a big impact that the entire mood (and story you tell) of your image quickly changes. So, consider what you wish to convey. If it’s a huge waterfall with a lot of power you might want to use a quick shutter speed to capture its raw power and beauty. While a smaller waterfall might be more appealing when you use a slow shutter speed (long exposure). Experimentation is always the key when working with shutter speeds. Rjukandefossen, Norway 1/5th of a second shutter speed. For the image above, I chose to use a shutter speed slow enough to require the use of a tripod but not so long that the water would become completely blurred. The textures in the water help build the overall atmosphere...

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Lightroom Better | Using The Point Curve For The Look You Want

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Lightroom Better | Using The Point Curve For The Look You Want

One of Lightroom’s most powerful tools is often overlooked, in part because it is set to its much less powerful form by default, with a tiny button to change it into something really useful tucked away in a corner. That tool is Lightroom’s Tone Curve. When first exploring Lightroom’s many panels, it’s common for new users to experiment with the Tone Curve, realize that it corresponds to sliders for highlights, lights, darks, and shadows in a manner that’s very similar to sliders that are found in the Basic Adjustments panel, and dismiss it as a redundant feature. If you came to this conclusion, however, you, like many others, would have missed the tiny icon in the bottom right of the Tone Curve panel that, when hovered over, says “click to edit Point Curve.” When you click that little button, you will open up a new world of possibilities. This one click will bring a much more Photoshop-like, robust curves experience into Lightroom. The Point Curve mode offers much more control and precision than the default ‘regional mode’, and it is the mode on which we’ll focus. LIGHTROOM BETTER & FASTER | 3 TIPS TO GET MORE SPEED & PRECISION WITHIN LIGHTROOM LIGHTROOM CAN QUICKLY SHOW YOU WHAT GEAR YOU NEED & DON’T NEED What is the Tone Curve? Whether it’s in its slider-based default regional mode or its precise Point Curve mode, the main portion of the Tone Curve panel consists of a square graph containing a condensed histogram and a diagonal line running from the bottom left corner to the top right. You can grab points on the line and drag it up or down and tones corresponding to the part of the histogram covered by the line at that specific point will change respectively. What Can It Do? The Tone Curve has many uses. If you use Curves adjustments in Photoshop, this will look very familiar. If you grab the center of the line and pull it upward, it will essentially do the same thing as dragging the exposure slider in the Basic panel toward the right. Conversely, dragging down from the center would be like dragging the exposure slider to the left. If you’d like to increase the contrast in your image using the Tone Curve panel, this can be done by creating the famous “S-Curve.” Grab a point in the middle of the right section of the curve and bump it up a little, then grab a point in the middle of the left section and bring it down a little. [REWIND:] LIGHTROOM FASTER | MATCH TOTAL EXPOSURE VS. SYNCHING EDITS A ‘matte’ look can be achieved by grabbing the very far left end of the line, which represents the deepest blacks in the image and bumping it up a little. Repeat in reverse with the other corner; drag down the top right point representing...

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The story of the film: A beginner’s guide to black and white film development

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

The story of the film: A beginner’s guide to black and white film development

I love the immediacy of digital photography. In fact, I’m puzzled how anyone managed to gain expertise in the days of film: it takes hours, sometimes days, to get any feedback on the shot you’ve taken. By that time, I’ve usually forgotten about the camera settings I used or even what I was trying to […] The post The story of the film: A beginner’s guide to black and white film development appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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How to Make Your Own Frames and Borders Using Photoshop

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to Make Your Own Frames and Borders Using Photoshop

Give your photos an edge! This tutorial will show you how to make your own frames and borders using Photoshop. Picture frames have been around for most of art history. This hasn’t change in our digital age. Whether you print your photo or leave it digital, adding an edge to it will always help its presentation. Here are three creative frames and borders that are easy to make in Photoshop. Back in the analogue-photography era, it was very common to leave a white edge around your photo so that the passé-partout wouldn’t cover any part of your image. If the photograph was an artwork, the blank part in the bottom would be bigger than the rest so that you could put your signature there. Nowadays, a classic and elegant presentation can still be achieved with Photoshop following this idea. Of course you can get also much more creative! Let’s start with the basics: FRAMES White Frame If you want to print your photo and have it framed in a traditional way, follow these easy steps: Open your image in Photoshop. Go to the top Menu >> Image >> Canvas Size. In the popup window you will have the choice for the New Size. There you need to change the measurement to Percent, that way it will be even all around your photo without you having to make a lot of calculations. Then choose how big you want your frame. In this case I chose to add 10% so the total size will be 110%. Make sure your anchor point is in the center (as shown in the picture below). At the bottom you can also choose the color of your frame. Click OK to apply. Open the Canvas Size window again, but this time you will put your anchor point on the top center square (as shown in the image below). Add an extra 10% to the top/bottom so you leave the width at 100%, and change only the height to be 110%. Add your signature, copyright or dedication under your image. Photo with white border and signature applied using this method. Composed Frames This basic idea of the white frame can be elaborated a little more in order to create a composition with a very elegant result. This is perfect for minimalistic or classic photographs. Open your image in Photoshop. Go to the top Menu >> Image >> Canvas Size and choose size and width of your frame just like you did for the white frame. This time you can get a little more creative, just remember to keep the anchor in the center. When you are done click OK. Repeat step #2, changing to a different color and size. For example, for this one I decided to first use a gray frame of 3% and then a slimmer one in the color of the grapes to complement...

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How I created a homage to Universal studios Wolfman in Photoshop

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How I created a homage to Universal studios Wolfman in Photoshop

Recently I got to work with FX makeup artist Nikoleta Tzani on a few projects. So far or collaborations have created neo-noir demons, Zombie hordes, Baba Yaga (a Slavic witch) and Recently this homage to Universal Studios Wolfman. Being that we are both big horror fans, I jumped at the chance when Nikoleta said she had […] The post How I created a homage to Universal studios Wolfman in Photoshop appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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Weekly Photography Challenge – Backlighting

Posted by on May 27, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Weekly Photography Challenge – Backlighting

If you aren’t sure what backlighting is all about, check out these 18 stunning examples. By Stefan Lins Weekly Photography Challenge – Backlighting Good lighting is key to creating successful and powerful images. Backlighting is one such way to use light to your advantage. Certain subjects lend themselves well to having the light come from behind, or even through them. Such as: Leaves and flowers Steam and smoke Anything translucent that the light can come through Water Glass Hair (portraits that use backlight add a glow to the subject’s hair) Pets (same with fur!) Cut fruit and some foods What other things can you think of that look great backlit? By Bill Gracey By M.G.N. – Marcel By Torben Worm Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. Share in the dPS Facebook Group You can also share your images on the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well. The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Backlighting by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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