New Tamron ‘Ultra-Telephoto’ 18-400mm F3.5-6.3 Zoom Lens

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

New Tamron ‘Ultra-Telephoto’ 18-400mm F3.5-6.3 Zoom Lens

It’s no secret Tamron has been trying to reinvent itself and public perception of them for the past few years. Perhaps spurred on by Sigma’s success in doing the same, Tamron has had an identify shift and much of what’s been coming out as a result has caught our attention. Their Di VC line is particularly good and from the 70-200 to 85mm from that line, Tamron is covering the bases. Their latest announcement however, looks to be trying to cover all the bases in one shot. The new lens announced today is the 18-400mm F3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD for APS-C, and they’re calling it the ‘world’s first ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens.’ TAMRON SP 70-200MM F/2.8 DI VC USD G2 | LENS REVIEW Everyone loves a good all rounder, and the proliferation of 24-70 2.8s and the success of something like Canon’s 24-105 F/4 is absolute evidence of that. The thing is though, those are 2.8 and f/4 respectively, making them significantly faster. They aren’t super-zooms though, and superzooms have sort of been Tamron’s thing for the last few decades, which makes this seem promising. Having 2.5 stops of image stabilization (CIPA Standards Compliant) is great to have here, and needed, and if it works as well as it does in other Tamron’s then we can probably expect it to function really well in this. To make it even more compelling, the lens isn’t vey big. In fact, it’s small, coming in at 5 inches long and weighing only 25oz, suggesting it’s probably an easy lens to operate even with that crazy reach. This looks like like yet another compelling offering from Tamron, and a compelling travel companion and all rounder for sports, airshows and such, and the price? Only $649. You can find it here.        Share...

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Dog Photographer Of The Year Contest Winners Announced

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Dog Photographer Of The Year Contest Winners Announced

Who doesn’t love dogs? If you’re severely allergic, I’ll assume that you love them but can’t bear their presence so you will be forgiven, but otherwise, c’mon. They’re our best friends. They’re there to cheer you up when you’re sad, lovingly drool on you when you’re eating something tasty, share their snuggly warmth on a cold night, bark at intruders and that mean vacuum cleaner – they’ve got your back and they’re preciously adorable. With the assumption that you love dogs (of course you do,) you’re going to love this. Here are winners from the annual Dog Photographer Of The Year competition put on by UK’s ‘The Kennel Club,’ sponsored by SmugMug and Nikon School among others. Photographers from around the world compete for the top spot in 10 categories, including two that are only for young photographers. Here is a selection of winners for your viewing pleasure. The rest can be seen here, including two runners-up from each category. If you could use a pick-me-up today, I suggest you begin with the ‘Puppy’ category. PUPPY © Mirjam Schreurs Speaking of which, here is the first place winner from that category by Mirjam Schreurs of the Netherlands. This is Tyson the boxer puppy at fourteen weeks. I’m sure your day is better already. Dog Portrait ©Anastasia Vetkovskaya In the ‘Dog Portrait’ category, first place went to Russian photographer, Anastasia Vetkovskaya for her shot of SISLEY- SHOU GERAT GRANT AHTIAR AK JAR, who is a very majestic Afghan Hound. [REWIND:] PET PHOTOGRAPHY | 3 QUICK TIPS FOR BETTER DOG PHOTOS Young Pup Photographer ©Dylan Jenkins From the ‘Young Pup Photographer’ category for kids 11 and younger, we have this sweet hound dog, Mosey, as captured by Dylan Jenkins of Swansea. DOGS AT PLAY ©Kaylee Greer Pet photography enthusiasts will likely be familiar with the work of this oft-emulated American photographer and educator. Kaylee Greer took first place in the ‘Dogs At Play’ category with this photograph of Wheaten Terrier, Petey. Overall winner and ‘Man’s Best Friend’ ©Maria Davison Ramos Last, but certainly not least, we have the overall competition winner and first place winner in the ‘Man’s Best Friend’ category. Maria Davison Ramos of Portugal captured young Yzma, a Golden Retriever mix, shortly after her rescue by one of the photographer’s friends. There is your daily dose of adorable, but if you aren’t satiated, and who could blame you, look at the rest of the winners on the competition’s website, here. SaveSave SaveSaveSaveSave        Share...

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4 Tips For Photographers To Figure Out What You Love & How To Start Without A Large Investment

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

4 Tips For Photographers To Figure Out What You Love & How To Start Without A Large Investment

Do you remember the sensation when you first held your first camera in your hands? My first purchase was a Hasselblad 501cm (see below) in the special edition sun yellow color. It was a little hefty, but felt solid. I learned the basics of photography and fell in love with that camera. My ears still perk up when I hear brand new photographers getting excited about their first DSLR and lens purchase. With the digital age, aspiring photographers can immerse themselves in online education. The instantaneous feedback that digital so graciously provides drastically decreases the amount of time required to learn as opposed to the analog day, and a steep college tuition bill is no longer a prerequisite to be taken seriously, especially now that doing the real work as an assistant seems to carry more weight than a degree. I often engage in conversations with eager photographers who are in the beginning stages of that adrenaline rush. Everything is exciting, new, and a little overwhelming. Photography is one expensive hobby but can be so therapeutic. One of the main questions I get asked is: How do I find what I am passionate about and how do I go about it? 1) Photograph everything. In the beginning, experiment with it all; become one with your camera in nature while learning what it takes to capture the vast landscapes with all of its beauty and everything that nature has to offer. Photograph that beautiful meal sans the smartphone. Adjust your settings to capture the speed of a sporting event and test its limits by dragging the shutter to make a raging river look as smooth as glass. Get a tripod and experiment with architecture and interiors. Take that trip you’ve been dying to take and try to capture it from your perspective through your lens. Go out with some friends and take your stab at the fundamentals of portraiture. As your skills progress, offer to assist on jobs such as weddings, headshots, and/or product photography. Understand that the photographer you are assisting is offering a quick lesson equivalent to that of a semester class. Immerse in it and learn as much as you can. You will soon have an inkling of the direction you would like to go. 2) Don’t buy gear. Rent it. Once you have found yourself gravitating toward a few specific niches, plan out shoots to build a foundation and rent gear to get the job done. Many states have rental shops that you can rent from for the day. If not, there are also websites such as borrowlenses.com and lensrentals.com or Lumoid. The day rate may seem a little pricey at first, however, it is a lot less expensive in the long run than spending $1000+ on a lens that isn’t needed and can only be re-sold for a fraction of that price. Rent a wide...

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6 Tips To Make Your Drone Footage Cinematic

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

6 Tips To Make Your Drone Footage Cinematic

Drones are more than expensive toys for hobbyists who want in on the latest tech fad. They are an incredibly useful tool that is empowering filmmakers expand the scope and options of telling their story. With that in mind it is important to approach the use of this tool with the same thoughtfulness applied the rest of your film making kit. The team over at Travel Feels shares six tips to making the most out of your drone investment. [RELATED: DJI MAVIC | THE PERSONAL DRONE TO DASH GOPRO DREAMS] #1 – Time of Day Every tool has limitations and knowing what your gear can and cannot do allows you to overcome its shortcomings. Drone technology is still maturing and the cameras on these devices typically don’t have the same robust dynamic range of their more advanced DSLR and mirrorless counterparts. This means the most favorable lighting for your drone is probably at sunrise or sunset. #2 – ND Filter ND Filters are an absolute necessity for outdoor video of every kind, not just drone footage. As the video says, they cut down on the light that makes it to your camera’s sensor, allowing you to use wider apertures and slower shutter speeds. Without them you would not be able to match the settings that create a cinematic look in your videos. #3 – Slow Movements Much of movie magic is created by the subtlety of camera movements and, if you want to immerse your viewers into what you’re showing them, slow camera movements are a tried and true method of doing so. This will allow your viewers to soak in the scenery and add a sense of gravity to your story. #4 – Color Match & Color Grading As a rule of thumb, maintaining a consistent look throughout a sequence of shots is the ideal creative choice. This is achieved by color matching and color grading each portion of footage to look the same. If you are using footage from more than one camera, the footage from each needs to look the same in your final edit. Furthermore, adding a unique and stylized feel to your shots with a specific color grade needs to be applied consistently to maintain continuity between the shots. Tools to accomplish this are: Waveform – this tool helps you obtain the proper exposure. Vector Scope – this tool helps you adjust the color of your footage. #5 – Zoom Adding a digital zoom is a creative method of adding some flare or drama to your footage and is another means of pulling your viewers into your story. Manipulating the perspective of your viewer in ways that the human eye can’t add a great visual effect to you story #6 – Cinema Crop Bars The black bars at the top and bottom of the screen are a hallmark of the cinematic experience. You can...

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Here’s how to use light to convey different emotions in your work

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Here’s how to use light to convey different emotions in your work

There are plenty of factors that can convey the emotion want to express through your image. While light is one of the essential components for creating a photo in the first place – it also contributes a lot when it comes to the emotional impact. In this video, Jay P. Morgan shares four aspects of […] The post Here’s how to use light to convey different emotions in your work appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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Instagram Stars Dish On The Platform | @itsbigben, @bensasso, @benjhaisch, @katchsilva & @jeremycowart

Posted by on Jun 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Instagram Stars Dish On The Platform | @itsbigben, @bensasso, @benjhaisch, @katchsilva & @jeremycowart

I joined the Instagram community about a month before I got married in late 2012. I didn’t have a direction for it, I had been a wedding photographer for about 3 years at that point and was mostly curious. Instagram had been something I almost exclusively made fun of because of the types of things people were really into showing off to the world… like every meal they ever ate. My life wasn’t a whole lot more interesting then but I mostly wanted a place to document some fun new things in my married life. I didn’t start taking it seriously until 2014 when I decided to spend more time editing my mobile pictures and trying to showcase myself as someone who knows what they’re doing with a camera. I also decided to post every day just to challenge myself creatively and for a discipline. Soon after I was featured as a ‘suggested user’ (remember the badge?… ahh the good ol’ days) and then my audience went from a few thousand to almost 20 thousand in a couple weeks. Aside from being a huge blast of endorphins and ego-boost it also helped me to really research how to use it best and how to craft a feed. [REWIND: DRAMATIC PORTRAITS | MY 5 ESSENTIAL TOOLS TO CREATE DRAMA IN YOUR PORTRAITS] You may not be a pulls-the-car-over-for-the-shot kind of person or a takes-picture-while-driving kind of person. But in Iceland you will be. I miss this weird place a lot. A post shared by Ryan Longnecker (@ryanlongnecker) on Jun 12, 2017 at 8:59am PDT Fast-forward, now I can’t go a week without hearing some drama about someone else who hates the algorithm, considers quitting, ‘shadowbans’, fake followers, scamming companies, banned accounts, new features stolen from other platforms, blah blah blah. So, I reached out to some seasoned pros to get their opinions about the platform. It’s good to listen widely, to spread out and ask reputable people from various stages in the profession. I asked a few good friends who also happen to be some really respected names on Instagram, and even more broadly, in the photo community. Here’s what they had to say. Glean the wisdom… go on, glean. How long have you been using Instagram? @benjhaisch – I just scrolled allllll the way to the end of my Instagram and saw that my first post was in August of 2011. @bensasso – Don’t you dare make me scroll all the way back to actually find out. No idea, maybe 7 years? @jeremycowart – I’ve been on Instagram since the very, very beginning [2010]. I was on so early that people would mock my use of it haha. I was featured early and often but then I took 4 years away from it basically to focus on building our own social network (OKDOTHIS). I regret moving away from it...

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