Top 5 Essential Photography Tips I Can’t Live Without

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Top 5 Essential Photography Tips I Can’t Live Without

These are my big five photography tips which I would take with me to a desert island, the ones I can’t live without. For those who have not had the pleasure, that is a reference to the BBC Radio Four program, Desert Island Discs, which has been running for more than 70 years. The simple premise of the program is that guests choose just eight pieces of music they’d want if they were going to be marooned on a desert island. Desert island I think that these lists are much easier to complete if given criteria. This is my Desert Island Big Five. They are chosen on the basis that if you could only apply five ideas to your photography for the rest of your shutter button pushing days, perhaps on a desert island, these would be the ones which I would recommend. #1 – Follow guidelines not rules Did you ever see the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie? Captain Barbossa (played with menace by Geoffrey Rush) chastised the main character Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp), that he could not do something, because “It is not in the Pirate Rule Book”. With great, exaggerated, cheeky charm, and great comic timing, Jack Sparrow replied “I do not think of it as a RULE book … more as GUIDELINES …” It is my strong belief that all articles and photography tips, such as this one, should be considered in the same way. The first rule is that there are NO rules, there are only guidelines. You should do just as you like. If you enjoy taking the photographs, processing them, and then you enjoy looking at the results, that is enough. Pleasing yourself and no one else is absolutely enough. If you want to take photographs of people’s feet, go ahead! If you want to take a photograph of … well, what exactly do you think this might be (below)? What is it? It is actually the bottom of a curtain, with the morning light streaming in. Not a common photographic topic, but it is an image of reasonable interest. There are no rules, only guidelines, Do what you like! Do whatever turns you on! I could live with that suggestion alone on my desert island. This next photograph follows the suggestion of having no rules. I think it is unlikely that any rule is going to tell you to photograph the bottom half of someone’s face, right? This photograph also leads on to the next guideline. #2 – Fill the frame A good photography tip and guideline to live by is that the subject of the photograph should not be in doubt, it should fill the frame. This is an unusual school building in Al Ain, in the UAE. The photograph above shows the scene well enough. However what is interesting in the scene? The subject of the photograph is...

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Gorgeous Slow Motion Footage Of F-15s In Japan | Samurai Drivers

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Gorgeous Slow Motion Footage Of F-15s In Japan | Samurai Drivers

If you’ve been around military aviation you’ll be familiar with the McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, and even if you haven’t you’ll likely have seen them somewhere given they’re often regarded as the most successful fighter jet in history, and maybe too since they are frequently mistaken for the F-14 Tomcat – everyone’s favorite Top Gun character. But you’ve likely never seen F-15s like this; not in these liveries, and not in gorgeous slow motion. Shot on a Panasonic GH4 using a Metabones T Smart Adapter EF to MFT for use with some nice Canon glass, Vimeo user 1-300 has captured some of the romance of aviation in his short films, and this one in particular. His subjects are F-15Js of the Hiko Kyodotai, the Japanese Air Self Defense Force’s Aggressor adversary squadron that provides air combat training for the rest of the units. Gear List Panasonic GH4 Metabones T Smart Adapter EF to MFT Canon EF 70-200mm F2.8 L Canon EF 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 L Canon EF X2 III Edit & Grading : DAVINCI RESOLVE 12.5 Japan is the largest buyer of F-15s outside of the United States and these are about their most famous. Now based out of Komatsu Air Base, the F-15J, DJ, and Kai variants of the Hiko Kyodotai are perhaps the most colorful and vibrant F-15s in the world, and rarely filmed quite like this. The fighter aircraft environment is a visceral, savage, physically demanding one characterized by precision, aggression, and speed, but the GH4’s slow motion footage of them is nothing if not soothing. The jets are beautiful and their movements graceful at these frame rates and you really get an appreciation of all of that. It’s Memorial Day weekend here in the US and this seems a fitting visual. The footage may be filmed in Kyakori, and the Jets with Japanese livery, but they’re sparrow-shooting F-15s and that heavy metal is as American as it gets. The F-16 may have had Iron Eagle, the F-14 Top Gun, and seems the F-15 has 1-300, more of whose work can be found here. It makes me wish the GH4 had been around before the Tomcats were retired. [REWIND: AT THE #1 AIRPORT IN THE WORLD FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS, AIRCRAFT LOOK LIKE SHOOTING STARS & FIREFLIES]        Share...

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6 Tips for Getting Sharper Wildlife Photos With a Super Telephoto Lens

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

6 Tips for Getting Sharper Wildlife Photos With a Super Telephoto Lens

In recent years, super telephoto lenses by third-party manufacturers such as Sigma and Tamron have been made available on the market for really reasonable prices. Earlier on, photographers had no choice but to spend a huge amount in order to buy a super telephoto lens, but now these third-party lenses make it more affordable. One such super telephoto lens is the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM, which allows you to get much closer to a distant subject. Using a super telephoto lens for wildlife photography is in itself a skill to master as you may not get sharp and clear results when you first pick up the lens. The tips below will help you get work better with a super telephoto lens so you can capture sharper wildlife photos going forward. #1 – Choose the correct shutter speed Selection of the best shutter speed is one of the most important tasks when doing wildlife photography. There is a standard rule which says that the shutter speed should be equal to or faster than the focal length of the lens you’re using. So, if you are shooting with a 500mm focal length, then you need a shutter speed of at least 1/500th or faster (1/1000th, 1/2000th, and so on). Shooting at a shutter speed slower than 1/500th can introduce camera shake and thus will affect the sharpness of the image. However, if your lens features image stabilization technology, you can then shoot at a slower shutter than the focal length. How much slower will depend on the performance of the technology for that particular lens. NOTE: This rule is applicable for full-frame digital cameras. If you are using an APS-C sensor camera, then you also have to multiply the focal length by the crop factor of your camera brand (1.5x for Nikon, 1.6x for Canon, etc). In this case, the focal length would become 750mm with a Nikon APS-C sensor camera and thus a shutter speed of 1/750th of a second or faster needs to be used to get sharp photos. Usually super telephoto lenses such as the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM perform the best from 150mm to 500mm, and as you go beyond 500mm the sharpness starts to lessen. So try and avoid using a focal length which is towards the maximum limit of a telephoto lens. #2 Use the right aperture value In wildlife photography, depth of field plays a great role in helping to make the subject stand out from the background. In case you are not aware, shooting with wider aperture (smaller aperture values like f/2.8) helps you to achieve shallow depth of field. This results in a photo where the subject is sharp and well segregated from the background, which itself will be out of focus. But this does not mean that you blindly shoot using the smallest available aperture value. Instead,...

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How To Be Better At Mobile Photography | A Sample Workflow & Breakdown

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How To Be Better At Mobile Photography | A Sample Workflow & Breakdown

Did you know your phone has more technology in it than the Space Station? Ok, I didn’t even try to verify that but they are amazing – like, seriously amazing. We’ve reached a point in mobile photography where, at least for mobile viewing purposes, you can have imagery that stands up to the top-of-the-line cameras. The same things apply to shooting and editing photos on any platform: the more experience, knowledge of light, and practice you have the better your images will be to start with. Here are some very general editing ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’ that can step up your mobile photography game at any stage. # A post shared by Ryan Longnecker (@ryanlongnecker) on May 8, 2017 at 8:59am PDT I want to give you a little heads up about me and mobile editing: I’m obsessive, but I also love it. It’s therapeutic and I find myself editing for fun on car and plane rides. Not everyone will love it, and for those people, your patience might run too thin too quickly and your mobile photography game might always feel a little weak. It should be stressed that for most people mobile photography is a hobby, even for professional photographers, shooting with our phones is something we do when we aren’t working (and sometimes when we are). Here we’ll go through an editing progression going over a few of my favorite apps, my workflow, and some quick things you can do or avoid doing to get those likes, err… I mean artistic gratification. [RELATED: CORTEX CAMERA APP REVIEW | ONE OF THE BEST PHOTOGRAPHY APPS, PERIOD] First: Shooting Apps First, normal level – standard camera app on your phone. Second, nerd level, ProCam. If I remember to switch over or have time I’ll use ProCam because I can manually adjust focus and exposure and lock it. The main reason though, is it allows my iPhone to shoot in RAW, or more accurately, DNG. I’m not sure what phones have that option now but I know both the iPhone7 and iPhone7+ have the option. Shooting RAW on your phone will allow the most room for editing, but will also need the most room on your phone so you’ll need something bigger than 32GB if your plan is to make shooting and editing RAW on your phone a regular thing. There is plenty to be said elsewhere about how to shoot with your phone or how to take good photos in general, so we won’t address thst precisely. One thing I’ve noticed, though, is that if you do mix up DSLR images and phone images you’re going to need to put in a little work to make sure the phone images aren’t a huge eyesore on your feed, assuming eyesores are something you’d want to avoid. One more thing is for people who tend to post mostly or all phone...

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Sh*t Model Management | Anonymous Models’ Instagram Account Hilariously Exposes The Fashion Industry

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Sh*t Model Management | Anonymous Models’ Instagram Account Hilariously Exposes The Fashion Industry

be nice to me Disclaimer: This post has a modicum of swearing There’s a recurring motif within the photography world (particularly in fashion) where models-turned-photographers seem to have an easier time booking clients, and have a quicker and steeper ascent than the average joe. Some may refer to it with negative connotations as ‘endemic’, but frankly, it’s just logical. In every field there’s a premium on experience, which is why in many cases age and guile beat youth an innocence (read: experience versus naiveté) and to agencies, clients, and other models alike, models understand the business. They will understand how agencies work, the operations of a shoot, who is supposed to do what, how to interact with other models, and have an understanding of what the lives models live are like – something most others don’t get. But if you did want a peek behind the curtains into the real private lives and thoughts of models, Instagram account shitmodelmgmt is your voyeur’s perch. [ON NOW: 2017 MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND SALE] i don’t even have boobs why do u want me to go topless 🤦‍♂️ A post shared by Shit Model Management (@shitmodelmgmt) on May 7, 2017 at 3:08pm PDT Started by two models who choose to remain anonymous, the Instagram account Shitmodelmgmt was born out of frustration with the industry and has become a place where models can express the same. It communicates the realities of #modellife using the most effective communication tool ever known to humankind; something that transcends borders, gender, age, race, and even political affiliation: the meme. When you take a funny video for your story but you can see how god awful the model apartment is in the background A post shared by Shit Model Management (@shitmodelmgmt) on Apr 17, 2017 at 5:07pm PDT I will never fully know A post shared by Shit Model Management (@shitmodelmgmt) on Apr 8, 2017 at 10:23am PDT Speaking to their dedicated audience of over 120k IG followers –and everyone else who follows in the shadows– Shitmodelmanagement uses memes to cut right to the heart of a matter with humor, and those who have ever spent time with models or in the fashion industry can scroll through and immediately feel right at home. And for those that haven’t? It’ll be a primer on the inner thoughts on those in the industry and give you an inkling of just how unglamorous and difficult model life can be, and generate some empathy with your subjects. There’s much to glean from this like the evident undercurrent of models’ insecurities. From the soul-sucking wait times of castings, to the ‘life’ in a model apartment, it’s all there and worth a look. #repost @houseofholland Stylists must be so brave… A post shared by Shit Model Management (@shitmodelmgmt) on Apr 6, 2017 at 2:33pm PDT I knew I should have become Vine famous 🤧 A...

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Agata Serge | Insight, Gear, & ‘How To’s’ From The #QueenOfBokeh

Posted by on May 28, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Agata Serge | Insight, Gear, & ‘How To’s’ From The #QueenOfBokeh

#QueenofBokeh. That’s the hashtag associated with Agata Serge, and while it makes for a nice soundbite and marketing tag, it’s actually a bit limiting, and, in my most humble opinion, a disservice to her work. I first heard about this young and accomplished photographer through the hashtag, and as someone who is notoriously annoyed with the broad obsession over images with a primary focus on the de-focused, the initial viewing was approached with low expectations. Quickly, however, the script was flipped. Her work is compelling, and so much more than ‘bokeh’, but 500px caught up with Serge for a webinar where she dishes on her approach to bokeh, speaking about method, tools, thought process, and post processing. [REWIND: HOW TO UPLOAD IMAGES TO FACEBOOK AT HIGHER QUALITY WITH LESS BANDING & ARTIFACTS] Having begun her career in 2012, Agata currently resides, works, and studies in Lodz, Poland, where she is pursuing a master’s degree in Photography at the National Film School and in 2014 she was mentioned as one of the most emerging fashion photography talents by Roy Kahmann for Dutch Vogue. With a career trajectory like that and a cool 112,000 followers on 500PX, over 80k on and Instagram, and a string of other noteworthy accolades to her name, it makes sense 500px would try to arrange a webinar with her, and in case you missed it here are a few clips. Agata’s work is compelling for a myriad of reasons; from their general appeal, to the fact she seems able to take simple and common scenarios and execute uncommonly good imagery in them (also does a nice job color grading), to the fact she is paragon of the idea that you don’t need the pinnacle of equipment to make great work. From 500px we glean that she uses a Canon 6D and Sony A7 with frequency, and aside from her affection for lenses from ‘The Bokeh Factory‘ she relied on a cheap Canon 50mm 1.8 and a few ‘distractors’ to start. A post shared by Agata Serge Photography (@agataserge) on Apr 10, 2017 at 10:19pm PDT Had this absolutely amazing opportunity yesterday to be one-day intern for Alexi Lubomirski in NY <3 @alexilubomirski #alexilubomirski #agataserge #polaroid #nyc #ny #portraitphotography #portraitphotographer #fashionphotographer #fashionphotography A post shared by Agata Serge Photography (@agataserge) on May 4, 2017 at 7:39am PDT Favorite Lenses Mentioned Canon 50mm f/1.8Zeiss Planar 50mm f/1.4 Zeiss Biotar 50mm f/1.4The Bokeh Factory 80/2 Certainly worth the time to have a view of these short videos, and check out Agata’s 500px profile, site, and you can follow her on Instagram. You can also get more detail from the full 500px blog post here.        Share...

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