Weekly Photography Challenge – Square

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Weekly Photography Challenge – Square

This week for the photography challenge let’s keep it simple and look for shapes. One in particular – the square. Weekly Photography Challenge – Square Look for square subjects. You can even crop your image into a square and make a composition that is suitable for that format. Shooting for a square is a bit different than using the regular camera format – try it and see how you do. Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. Share in the dPS Facebook Group You can also share your images on the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well. The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Square by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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SLR Lounge’s Top Lenses | Why You Need A 24-70mm f/2.8

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

SLR Lounge’s Top Lenses | Why You Need A 24-70mm f/2.8

Many photographers, if forced to choose only one lens to use for the rest of their days, would select a fast 24-70mm. It is an incredibly versatile focal length. There are even commercial photography schools that provide a list of required equipment they feel a graduate needed to transition into the professional world, where the single lens on it is a 24-70. The faculty in charge of guiding purchases knew incoming students would have a wide variety of career interests, from food to fashion, from product to portraits, and yet they felt confident that every one of their diverse body of students could succeed in the world with this one lens. And of course, they were right. While it may not be the single most ideal lens for every situation, it can get the job done in most. WHY SHOOT WITH A 24-70mm f/2.8 Some 24-70 lenses, like Canon’s 24-70mm f/2.8L II, for example, can rival primes in terms of sharpness. While time and energy can often be better spent on activities other than pixel-peeping, it’s definitely a satisfying feeling when you can zoom to 100% and find razor-sharp edges. As mentioned several times throughout this article, a 24-70mm on a full-frame body is among the most versatile focal ranges you can find, which is its biggest selling point. Not only does it allow for a great deal of diversity in your portfolio with naught but a single lens, on a microcosmic level it allows for a diversity of looks on any individual shoot and is great for adaptation to circumstance. For instance, on a pet shoot, where subjects can be notoriously all over the place, it’s really useful to be able to quickly change your perspective. Both ends can be good for close-up portraits of pets, with the wide end offering a quirky and fun look and the long end is more traditional. The wide end can also be great for including environmental elements for environmental portraits. The available range allows for more variety from the same subject and location than would a typical prime. Furthermore, it’s fast enough for low-light and subject isolation. Once you get used to fast apertures, it becomes painful to feel the constraint of slower glass. While f/2.8 obviously isn’t going to do as well in low light as f/1.2, it’s still plenty fast, and a fast 24-70 will have a fast 2.8 aperture throughout the entire focal range. This is ideal for low-light shooting, as you won’t lose any light at the long end, but the physics of constructing a lens with a constant maximum aperture do drive up the size and weight, and consequently, the price. THE DRAWBACKS While the 24-70mm f/2.8 is a wonderful lens, and while it is incredibly versatile, it does have its limitations. While some versions are as sharp as a prime, they aren’t as fast at...

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How To Make A Unique Wedding Ring Detail Shot | 3 Wedding Rings, 2 Lights. 1 Photo

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How To Make A Unique Wedding Ring Detail Shot | 3 Wedding Rings, 2 Lights. 1 Photo

As unique as it is challenging, wedding photography represents more a collection of genres rather than a genre itself. While we most often associate wedding photography with couples portraits, there’s a lot more that goes into telling the complete story. Throughout the course of a single wedding day, photographers regularly test their skills in family, fashion, landscape, and product photography. IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS One of the first tasks of the day, even before covering bride and groom prep, involves capturing the details, which includes everything from the dress to the shoes, and all the accessories between. You can find more tips on how to photograph wedding jewelry and details in our Photographing the Bride workshop. Join Premium Detail shots merge product and fashion photography (especially when worn), and they play a crucial role in telling the overall story. One of the most important and significant detail shots to capture is the wedding rings. PROBLEM: most wedding ring shots look sad & boring Before they are exchanged between the bride and groom, wedding rings take center stage in their own product shoot. Unfortunately, even though rings are beautiful and unique, most wedding ring shots are not. Reasons for this vary, from not having adequate time to simply not giving the wedding ring shots the same consideration for lighting and composition that is given for couples portraits. Whatever the reason, there’s a simple solution to make your wedding ring pictures rock. [REWIND: 10 Creative Ring Shots For You To Try] SOLUTION: USE a macro and CREATIVE LIGHTING Using a creative angle, a macro lens, and two off-camera flashes, you can add layers of depth and a touch of drama to make your wedding ring shots more interesting. Click right in the box below to see a behind-the-scenes video: How many lights do you think it took to create this shot? Swipe through to find the answer! #slrlounge A post shared by SLR Lounge (@slrlounge) on Mar 22, 2017 at 3:29pm PDT Here is how we used a two-light setup to capture a creative wedding ring picture: STEP #1: SCOUT THE LOCATION Before any shoot, we recommend scouting the location to find the best available scene. Whether you’re shooting indoors or outside, people or details, you should be able to find an adequate scene to serve as a backdrop for your session. When scouting, look for reflective surfaces or interesting patterns in the background, or objects to use for a shoot through. Remember, even with limited choices, you can always make the most of your locations. STEP #2: “pose” the wedding RINGS For a shot like this, It can be difficult to balance the rings. Depending on how you decide to set up your wedding rings, it might help to have glue dots to save time and keep the rings in place. The glue dots are easy to use and...

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How to create low key Rembrandt light portraits in the studio

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

How to create low key Rembrandt light portraits in the studio

Rembrandt had a wonderful way of simulating light in his paintings. So much so, that there’s a whole photography lighting technique named after him. Not surprisingly, Rembrandt lighting. It’s characterised by a small triangle of light under the subject’s eye on the shadow side of the face. It’s typical of how Rembrandt painted his subjects. […] The post How to create low key Rembrandt light portraits in the studio appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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Video Tutorial – How to Work a Scene to Find the best Light and Composition

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

Video Tutorial – How to Work a Scene to Find the best Light and Composition

In this short video tutorial, photographer Mike Brown takes you on a photo walk looking for images. Watch as he scans the scene and finds the best camera angle, waits for the right light, and frames the shot for the best composition. Go on a photo walk and see how Mike goes about working a scene, before quickly snapping a photo and moving on. Take your time, look around. If you see something interesting explore the scene a little. Have patience as well. Some key points you can learn from this tutorial include: Sometimes you need to wait for the light to change. Simplification is often a good thing. Move around the scene, and put things in the foreground as well. Use shadows for more creating more dramatic images. The post Video Tutorial – How to Work a Scene to Find the best Light and Composition by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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7 ways to improve your portraits with a reflector and white foamcore

Posted by on Sep 23, 2017 in Featured, Photography Tips

7 ways to improve your portraits with a reflector and white foamcore

5-in-1 reflector is a super-handy tool for both bounding and diffusing the light. Arron Nace from Phlearn shows you seven different setups you can create using a single light, with the addition of a reflector or even simple foamcore. Both the reflector and the foamcore are pretty cheap, yet they are versatile and can help […] The post 7 ways to improve your portraits with a reflector and white foamcore appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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