Fashion

Specially used in advertising purpose, fashion or studio photography is one of the most chosen type where every photographers love to end their career in. There are people who come in to a studio to get their photographs captures; family photos, couple photos, personal photos and more. Plus, this indoor photography promotes or endorses several clothing products, techs and gadgets, modern marvels, cars, etc. Also, fashion or studio photography comes under your control; everything about the equipment, cameras, lights, backgrounds can be selected as per the photographers creativity and you are the master of everything inside your studio.

Nikon’s New Feature: Automatic Autofocus Lens Calibration

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in canon, Fashion, Featured, landscape, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait

Nikon’s New Feature: Automatic Autofocus Lens Calibration

If we looked at the long list of annoyances in photography (and it is long), few would contest that sitting right near the top would be autofocus problems. There is nothing quite like special kind of fury felt when coming back from a shoot and loading up those image on a big screen only to find the majority are just enough out of focus to be unusable. Of course, this happens more frequently for some types of shooters than others; Landscape photographers shooting at infinity likely won’t have the problem quite to the same extent as a portrait or wedding photographer shooting at f/2 or shallower, but the problem is malignant. It’s one of the reasons we sing the praise of tethering and urge you to do it as much as possible, and why we care so much about being able to program buttons for single-press 100% zoom – so we can quickly analyze in-field when without a tether station. However, even when tethering and checking focus, that just tells you if you’re off; showing the symptoms rather than administering the cure. At least, however, the diagnoses is generally straightforward – your autofocus needs tuning. Just like any piece of machinery cameras and lenses go wrong sometimes and need calibration, and the problem is that most photographers don’t ever address autofocus calibration. In fact, the problem is of pandemic proportions. It’s somewhat understandable because it’s a bit of a geeky thing, and the traditional ways to calibrate are geeky endeavors, even if easy and inexpensive. You can buy a simple and straight-forward calibration tool (and should), and most cameras have menu options that allow you to do the fine tuning with these kits in no time. Lens Calibration tool example. Get this one as used by our Jay Cassario here. To be fair, these systems aren’t perfect, and many of these systems allow for AF fine tuning to only affect a single focal length and distance, but in my experience, it tends to be worth it. That said, Sigma – surprise, surprise – is doing it well and better with their dock. But Nikon is stepping up to the plate with their new Auto Autofocus calibration system to be found on their D5 and D500 cameras. The new cameras will be the first to offer the option, but there is hope that Nikon will be able to usher in the feature to other camera models via a firmware update. Essentially the Auto AF fine tuning just cuts out a few steps of the tuning process, but it still requires you to set some ‘controls’ when using it. Nonetheless, the controls required aren’t much, and you can do it in the field, on the fly. Now, mirrorless cameras are generally less symptomatic of these AF problems due to how they focus – right off the sensor, so it sort of...

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8 Tips for Photographing Men

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016 in Fashion, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait, Portraiture

8 Tips for Photographing Men

When I put my hand up to write an article about photographing men, it didn’t occur to me (until I sat down in front of a blank screen) just how big a topic it actually is. While much could be written about photographing men, from lighting ratios to posing, post-processing and more, there seems to be a drastic imbalance in the amount of material devoted solely to photographing men, as compared to women. A guide to how lighting ratios can differ for men, women and children are covered in the article Lighting Ratios to Make or Break your Portrait, and Tips for Posing Men offers suggestions, along with Posing Guide: 21 Sample Poses to get you Started with Photographing Men. When it comes to context, men are photographed within the genres of photojournalism, fashion, sports, travel, wedding and family photography, and corporate portraiture to name a few. My primary genre is family photography, and I also shoot corporate portraits. There is a growing demand for more relaxed professional portraits for clients to use on their LinkedIn profiles, professional Facebook pages – even online dating sites. Clients want a portrait that flatters, showcases their personality or perhaps the type of work they do, without looking too corporate. For the purpose of this article, I’ll be talking about photographing men mostly within these two contexts. Tip #1: Include him in the consultation process This tips sits at number one with good reason. One of the most common complaints I hear in portrait photographers’ forums is that of the reluctant father/husband – the guy who turns up to the family portrait session, looking like it’s the last place on earth he wants to be. His crankiness is infectious, and makes your job of capturing all those joyful family connections close to impossible. I confess, it was one of my bugbears also until I realized how often I’d been leaving male partners out of the consultation process altogether. In every grumpy dad case I encountered, I had mistakenly assumed that the women I spoke to during consultation would communicate everything to their partners, and in turn, share with me any concerns their partners had. Following a major light-bulb moment, I started to include men in the process, and it made a world of difference. Turns out, they just want to be heard. The more you engage with a man before the shoot, the more comfortable he will be when you are wielding a camera, and the better the photos you will get. This applies whether you’re photographing a paying client, the guy next door, or your brother. Ask him if he has any features he’s sensitive about. A prominent nose, a double chin, acne scarring and a bit of a tummy are common sensitivities. Allow him to express his insecurities without feeling silly, and reassure him that you can work around these with...

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A Guide To Content Aware Fill | Is it Still Useless?

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016 in Bokeh, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait

A Guide To Content Aware Fill | Is it Still Useless?

Ever wanted to remove something from your photos? Stupid question. We all have, and Content-Aware Fill is one of the many tools Photoshop provides which aids us at this endeavour. Whether it be a blemish, person, car, or building, Photoshop is your friend. Content-Aware Fill, however, has often been thought of as less than useful, to putting it politely. But advances in technology have improved it drastically, so Is this still the case, and for those that don’t know, what is Content-Aware Fill anyway? What is Content-Aware Fill? Content-Aware Fill, in the conventional sense, is accessed via Edit > Fill. Make a selection around the item you want to be removed, go to Edit > Fill, and you’ll be presented with the dialog you see below. Select Content-Aware from the drop down menu at the top, click ‘OK’, Photoshop analyses the pixels surrounding your selection and perfectly removes the offending object. At least, that’s how it should work. In practise, the results can vary wildly. As well as this “conventional” form of Content-Aware Fill, you will also find it in other forms throughout Photoshop. There’s Content-Aware Scale (Edit > Content Aware Scale), Spot Healing Brush, Healing Brush, Content Aware Move and the Patch tool. To one degree or another, each of those tools utilises, what I can only assume to be, a similar algorithm. The algorithm analyses the pixels surrounding your selection (or brush strokes) and replaces those pixels, thereby removing the object. The big difference between using Content-Aware Fill via Edit > Fill Vs. any of the other tools mentioned above, is that applying the effect through Edit > Fill requires your layer to not be empty. In other words, you’ll need to duplicate your background or create a merged layer for the effect to work. That can be annoying as it increases the file size dramatically and makes maintaining a non-destructive workflow a little more problematic. However, if you insist on continuing in that fashion, at the very least use the shortcut Shift + Backspace (PC) or Shift + Delete (Mac). [REWIND: AN EASY & QUICK WAY TO REMOVE DUST SPOTS USING CONTENT AWARE FILL] As well as the blank layer annoyance, another big difference between the methods mentioned above is the ability to adjust Structure and Color. The Patch Tool and Content Aware Move tool allow this refinement, even after you have made the adjustment. Now, I’m sure some of you are going “huh!?”. Let me explain. If you head over to Photoshop and select the Patch tool (hit shift > J until it appears) you’ll see the following menu and, hopefully, ‘Structure’ and ‘Color’. Those two settings allow us to restrict Photoshop. The higher the number, the more we give Photoshop free reign to adjust either the color or structure of whatever we are editing. Pick an image, use the patch tool to remove an...

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Capturing Movement As A Fashion Photographer | Devil Is In The Details

Posted by on Apr 21, 2016 in Fashion, Featured, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait

Capturing Movement As A Fashion Photographer | Devil Is In The Details

Being a model is a tough gig, and I say that in complete earnest. As a vocation, it’s fiercely competitive, and the shelf life of a model isn’t typically very long. That’s obvious, but the actual modeling isn’t exactly easy either. Among other things, it requires being physically bold and emoting in front of people you don’t know and just met; facing physical critique with maturity, and somehow managing to evoke in the viewer what the photographer/brand wants. A major way to evoke a feeling in the viewer is to show the right kind of movement, and nailing that movement is often difficult, and certainly not glamorous. In fact, it takes patience to repeatedly do something as banal as jumping whilst being mindful of every part of your body and expression – otherwise referred to as ‘keeping the face.’ This is where photographers can really show their merit, in how they communicate and direct and work with the muse. A photographer needs to be aware of the larger macro picture, as well as the micro details, but it helps if you know what to seek and what to look out for – there’s a difference. Things you seek are things like body symmetry and a graceful facial expression, and an example of things to look out for would be a foot that is hidden behind the other if facing a model head on. To learn this kind of thing, Melissa Rodwell has released a video with BREED on capturing movement wherein she discusses some of these finer points. Rodwell, having shot for brands like Ralph Lauren and Nike, to name a few, speaks to us as we look over her shoulder in-studio as she tries to coach a scantily clad model into delivering the perfect result. As the shoot progresses there are moments of pause and reflection where Melissa examines the shots she’s been tethering into Capture One and explains why some work and why some don’t. This isn’t a discussion on camera settings or lighting set-up, but rather on the finer details of capturing movement. [REWIND: FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY PORTRAITS | RECREATING THE WORK OF AN ICON WITH THE ICON WATCHING (DAVID BAILEY)] Not quite right Better Note*: Understanding how to move and direct and post, and what to seek and avoid in images with movement isn’t solely of interest to the fashion photographer. This information is widely applicable to anyone photographing people, like wedding photographers. If it is more of the technical details you want, BREED has released their Advanced Fashion Photography Lighting tutorial which I reviewed last year, in which you can find 22 detailed set-ups that encompass a wide gamut of the lighting looks you’ll see adorning the pages of fashion magazines. Check it out here. And on that note, I know many of you will be wondering what equipment she is using here, and while...

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Fashion Photography Portraits | Recreating The Work Of An Icon With The Icon Watching (David Bailey)

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in Fashion, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Fashion Photography Portraits | Recreating The Work Of An Icon With The Icon Watching (David Bailey)

John Rankin, otherwise known by his photographic working name, Rankin, is a rather wildly successful portrait and fashion photographer. He’s shot some of the biggest names for the biggest names in many genres. Names like David Gandy and Heidi Klum in fashion; Daniel Craig and Monica Bellucci in film; Rafa Nadal and Ronaldo in sport; and Katy Perry and Kieth Richards in music. His talent and client lists are populated as such that you’d imagine that whether on a yacht party during the Monaco Grand Prix, or the after party at the Oscars or fashion shows, you could throw a rock and you’re bound to hit 6 or 7 people he’s shot. 

In the noisy overpopulated photographic world in which we reside, he’s one that rises above the noise to a place of focus, and it’s hard to imagine there’s anyone he would find intimidating to work with, but there are – people like David Bailey. In 2009, Rankin released a documentary for BBC called Seven Photographs That Changed Fashion, where he recreated iconic images as tribute to the original greats; Photographers like Herb Ritts, Helmut Newton, Richard Avedon, and David Bailey. For those into beauty and fashion, you’ll no doubt be acquainted with these names because they are the ones that have set the tone and standard for us all, and working with any one of them is a bucket-list item even for Rankin. In the video herein, Rankin plucks an image from Bailey’s files and tries to recreate it using the same camera, a similar model, and setting, and with Bailey Present. Bailey is known to be quite a presence. He actually lives round the corner from my family and I’m too cowardly to go and ask even to borrow sugar, so I cannot imagine the pressure of having to recreate an iconic Bailey shot in front of the man himself. It’s actually a brilliant piece of film though if you’re into fashion and portraiture. You get a behind the scenes look at how photographers like this hold themselves, how they interact with their subjects, what tools they use, and if you pay attention to the precise verbiage they use, how they actually think about the craft and their own work. It’s marvelous really, that we can get a glimpse into something like this. It’s also refreshing to see that Bailey is forthcoming with the information about the shot, about how it was created, and why. He informs Rankin, and the viewer, that it was shot on a Rolleiflex, with a continuous light source, a plain background, no hair stylist or MUA, and not even a fan to blow the hair. The hair, he said, was blown up just using a piece of white board. [REWIND: BEAUTY & FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY | THE SPECIFICS THAT DIVIDE THE GREAT FROM THE MEDIOCRE] If you know Bailey and his work,...

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Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 16, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved and used the world over. If you’re in the market it’s $300 off the normal price sitting at $2,499, and can get that here. However, in addition to that you can get this bundle for $2,749 with rebate that includes: Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR Camera Body Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 Lens Canon Speedlite 430EX II Flash Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Professional Photo Inkjet Printer Lowepro Nova Sport 17L AW Shoulder Bag, Slate Gray Sandisk Extreme 32GB microSDHC Class 10 UHS-I Memory Card That’s quite a rounded kit, and not around for long. Get it here while still available. CANON 7D MK II With a 20MP refined APS-C sensor with dual pixel AF, the 7D MK II quickly became an item to get for many pros and enthusiasts. It’s got a rugged shutter designed for 200,000 actuations, a whopping 65 point AF system, and full 1080p at 60FPS. It’s one of the really attractive offerings from Canon and now is $300 less than normal sitting at $1,499 and even bundled with Lightroom. Get it here. Canon 70D We recently featured a Star Wars desert shoot (see here) which has received international attention and the entire shoot was done on a 70D, proving again that it’s a capable, dependable higher-end APS-C DSLR and right now can be had for $999. It’s unlikely this price will drop further anytime in the near future, and it’s a great buy. Get it here. NikoN (Still Offering HUGE SALES ON FX CAMERAS) D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in...

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