How to Light A Glass For Great Splash Photography

Posted by on Apr 19, 2016 in canon, Featured, nikon, Photography Tips

How to Light A Glass For Great Splash Photography

You can make some really creative photographs with high-speed photography. Fast shutter speeds and lights are the key components to success in freezing motion to make some spectacular special effects. From creating milky costumes for superheroes to taking your product photography to another level, there are many methods and uses for high-speed photography, and one of the most common is to freeze liquid to make a splash – literally and figuratively. Splash photography needn’t require much nor be extremely difficult. One method is to use a laser trigger to help with the process. In the following video from our friends at The Slanted Lens, Jay P. Morgan shows you how to not only use a laser trigger for high-speed splash photography but how to light a glass for a cool product photo. There isn’t an exact formula when it comes to high-speed or splash photography. All the work comes in the setup and then from there, it’s trial and error. In this instance, the first step is to properly light the glass. Jay P. points out that when you light glass, it’s about the light that goes through it, highlighting the shape and allowing a glow to come through. He does this by placing a Dynalite Baja B4 behind the glass and adjusting it to his liking. He also adds two translucent panels and a few more lights to light the sides of the glass. The glass is set on an IKEA glass tabletop, and the final component is setting up a MIOPS laser trigger. When the laser beam is broken, the strobes will be triggered faster than the blink of an eye. The rest is trial and error. As each ice cube is dropped in the glass, the timing has to be precise and the timer adjusted to get the look you want. Jay P. set his camera in bulb mode, opened the shutter with a remote to limit camera shake and adjusted his focus to the front of the glass. To see the entire process, check out the video below. Gear Used: Canon 5D Mark III Tamron 90mm Lens Canon Timer Remote Controller TC-80N3 MIOPS Smart Camera Trigger 3 Dynalite Baja B4        Share...

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4 Steps on How to Read Images and Learn to Replicate the Results

Posted by on Apr 19, 2016 in Bokeh, canon, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips, photoshop

4 Steps on How to Read Images and Learn to Replicate the Results

Earlier, I wrote an article called: why asking what camera settings were used may not be as helpful as you think, and in it, I touched on the concept of reading an image. Learning to read images – from a technical perspective and not a conceptual one – is something that I believe all photographers must be able to do, as it allows you to get a rough guide on what settings may have been used to create an image. They won’t be the exact settings; but you’re most likely not going to have the exact same lighting environment as what a particular photo was taken in. A wide aperture was used her to achieve a shallow depth of field. Dive in to read an image To begin reading images you must have, at the very least, a good understanding of aperture, shutter speed and to a lesser extent, ISO. You’ll want to understand how these things affect the image in different ways. For example, if you saw an image with a lot of motion blur, you would know from your understanding of shutter speed that a slower shutter speed was used. As you become more proficient with lighting and off-camera flash, you can even read how the subject was lit with artificial lighting, and begin to replicate how it was done. But don’t worry! This article will be focussing on the three major aspects of photography exposure (aperture, shutter speed and ISO) to help you begin your journey to reading images. What shutter speed was used here – a fast or slow one? Step 1: Shutter Speed – Fast or Slow? I find that determining whether a fast or slow shutter speed was used first, can help greatly when it comes to determining aperture and ISO later. The first thing you will want to ask yourself when assessing shutter speed is; was it fast or slow? This can be decided by how much, or how little, motion blur is present in the image, as that is what shutter speed controls. If everything in the image is pin sharp, and there is absolutely no motion blur at all, then a fast shutter speed would have been used. However, if there is a lot of motion blur, then a slow shutter speed was used. Here are some points that you can take out of knowing if the shutter speed is fast or slow: But how fast is a fast shutter speed, and at what point does the shutter speed become slow? To answer this, think of your shutter speed in relation to your subject’s speed. For example, when photographing sports or other fast action, you may find using a shutter speed of 1/1000th is required to freeze your subjects. This is because your subjects are moving quite fast. However, if you were to photograph people walking down the street, you...

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Striking Corporate Head Shots In Cramped & Boring Spaces

Posted by on Apr 18, 2016 in canon, Featured, macro, Photography Tips, portrait

Striking Corporate Head Shots In Cramped & Boring Spaces

Professionals of all walks need great head shots; Shots that are technically well executed and highlight a bit of their individuality and personality. Learning to love working with what you’ve got and the challenge presented by limitations is laborious but worth it. It will make you better and allow you to capture images in locations you might think unimaginable. [learn : “Yeah, we can do that!” I heard myself say it out loud. Then immediately thought, ” But HOW?” This is the predicament I found myself in with a corporate client a few years ago regarding professional ‘studio-style’ head-shots for staff. I was working out of a 130 sqft office at the time with just about enough room for a spare chair before being crowded, so I knew that I needed to figure out another option and quickly. When it comes to making things work and doing more with less, it’s something most photographers have to be able to do. Most never had the ability to just go buy everything for every situation right away. The choice is either do without, complain, or figure it out, and the ability to adapt serves photographers well. You’ll always be facing adversity and problems in different situations from clothing choice, location, client demands, weather, etcetera. So, with a client on the books for studio shots, I tried to adapt and I started making my plan for shooting in small spaces that would work for me, and this is by no means a rare occurrence; this kind of thing is often done on location in poorly lit office rooms or, quite literally, in storage rooms. It is where they have room, so we make it work. Getting set up When you’re shooting portraits on location, setup and travel both need to stay light. I usually take the following list of items: My camera roller bag which contains: 2 Bodies – Canon 5d ii and Canon 5d iii 3 Lenses – Canon 50mm 1.2, Canon 100L 2.8, and a Sigma 24-70 2.8 4 Speedlights – Yongnuo 568ex ii4 Wireless Triggers – Yongnuo 622c 1 Trigger Remote – Yongnuo 622c-tx My light bag which contains the following: 3 Light Stands – 10ft air cushion light stands1 Reflector – 43″ 5-in-1 reflector 1 Collapsible Background Kit – 5×6.5 twist pop-out photo backdrop 1 Large Softbox – Wescott Recessed Mega JS Apollo I am able to roll my bag in and carry my light bag, reflector and backdrop all in a single trip while still being able to open doors by myself. This quick and easy setup also allows me to get myself in and out of the building quickly, as well as work within a decently small area. Here is a shot of a two light setup with the background and reflector. During this shoot, I needed a black flag for the light that was off...

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Family Photography: Documenting An ‘Unconventional’ Childhood In A Modern Era

Posted by on Apr 18, 2016 in canon, Featured, Food, Photography Tips

Family Photography: Documenting An ‘Unconventional’ Childhood In A Modern Era

Quick, name five things you loved to do as a child (Mine were to read, roller skate, play with my friends, trade Garbage Pail Kids, and cuddle my puppy). If you’d ask my preteen daughter the same question, good luck, because she’s either busy on her phone texting her friends or on her laptop as many her age are doing. Childhood, as we knew it, has evolved into a generation of kids attached to their gadgets and do little more than grunt when you direct a question their way. Gone are the days where children were outside all day, using their imaginations and creativity to fuel their play. Not wanting that lifestyle for her own family and children, photographer Niki Boon moved her family to a rural 10-acre property in New Zealand. Choosing an “unconventional” lifestyle, Niki and her family live off their land and her children are homeschooled. A few years ago, while working as a Physiotherapist, Niki found her passion for photography in the darkroom, and then again after she quit her job as her children were born. In an article featuring her work in NatGeo, Niki explains, “My mother died when I was young, and now I have just a couple of small albums of faded but highly treasured six-by-four photos to tell my childhood stories. It is my passion to record as much as I can of my children’s day-to-day lives, as well as their adventures, in the most meaningful pictures I can take … their stories, our stories, and a piece of me. They’re for them to enjoy and relive for years to come.” And so is the basis of her current project, ‘Childhood in the Raw,’ family photography with the focus being on her family. Niki spends her days documenting her four children as they frolic in nature and living “life as it is.” For her, photographing them is a reflection of her own childhood, a nostalgic and sincere place of freedom, as she describes it. Niki captures moments where they are covered in mud, running free and wild, playing, and exploring. Her deeply personal family photographs are not only nostalgic for her, she believes that viewers will be reminded of aspects of their own childhood. With their rural life tending to animals, farming for their food, and the carefree simplicity of just being children, Niki is hoping to just “celebrate the magical place” that she chooses to live with her family and document it all along the way. Niki shoots with a Canon 5D Mark III and a 35mm 2.0 lens. Her post processing is simple with a few VSCO presets and “tweaks here and there.” You can see more of Niki Boon’s work on her website, Facebook, Instagram, and 500px. [Via Bored Panda]       Share...

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Wildlife Photography With A Wide-Angle Lens For Impact| Getting Your Subject & The Surroundings

Posted by on Apr 17, 2016 in canon, Featured, Food, nikon, Photography Tips, Wildlife

Wildlife Photography With A Wide-Angle Lens For Impact| Getting Your Subject & The Surroundings

Capturing wildlife with a telephoto lens is the technique of ‘traditional’ wildlife photography. It’s still commonplace and most certainly has its place, with many incredible photos taken using that approach. But put down your telephoto in exchange for a wide-angle lens and you’ll open the door to a whole new perspective with your wildlife photography. It may seem challenging, and to some degree it is, but once you are used to the technique it is not necessarily more difficult than using a telephoto – the results, of course, are just different. My lens of choice for this was a Nikon 14mm f/2.8, although I have since sold it and replaced it with a Nikon 18-35mm lens. I preferred the flexibility of a zoom lens rather than a prime. Equipment You’ll Need Aside from your DSLR and a wide-angle lens, you’re going to need a few more pieces of equipment. Joby Focus Gorillapod – This flexible tripod allows you to position your camera low to the ground in all sorts of terrains. YongNuo Shutter Release – These wireless shutter releases are cheap and robust. They work over radio signals, meaning they don’t need line-of-sight to activate your camera’s trigger. They have a range of up to 100 meters too, allowing you to stand at a distance and remotely trigger your camera. Setting Up Your Photo Think about what you’re trying to achieve here. The advantage of the wide-angle lens is the ability to introduce the surroundings into your photo. You are able to document the animal and its environment simultaneously, something that isn’t always possible with a telephoto lens. Positioning the camera as low to the ground as possible gives the unique perspective, and being below the eye-level of an subject makes the viewer feel smaller than the animal, turning our expectations of wildlife photography on its head. You can see in the above image that I’ve chosen to include the woodland surroundings of this red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris). To get the squirrel to come close to the camera, I placed some hazelnuts (one of their favorite foods) in front of the camera. You can do this for lots of different animals, but it is important to remain ethical with your photography and never use live bait. If you need to bait a carnivore, then you can collect road kill for scavengers. Once you’ve found your position, it’s time to set your camera up for action. Connect the trigger and make sure it is working properly. Switch your camera to aperture priority mode, allowing the camera to adapt to changing light conditions – something you can’t do yourself once you’ve stepped away. Make sure your focus is set to manual. You then can adjust the focus yourself, predicting where the animal will turn up. This is the tricky part, as any photo taken without the focus on the eyes will...

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Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 16, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved and used the world over. If you’re in the market it’s $300 off the normal price sitting at $2,499, and can get that here. However, in addition to that you can get this bundle for $2,749 with rebate that includes: Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR Camera Body Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 Lens Canon Speedlite 430EX II Flash Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Professional Photo Inkjet Printer Lowepro Nova Sport 17L AW Shoulder Bag, Slate Gray Sandisk Extreme 32GB microSDHC Class 10 UHS-I Memory Card That’s quite a rounded kit, and not around for long. Get it here while still available. CANON 7D MK II With a 20MP refined APS-C sensor with dual pixel AF, the 7D MK II quickly became an item to get for many pros and enthusiasts. It’s got a rugged shutter designed for 200,000 actuations, a whopping 65 point AF system, and full 1080p at 60FPS. It’s one of the really attractive offerings from Canon and now is $300 less than normal sitting at $1,499 and even bundled with Lightroom. Get it here. Canon 70D We recently featured a Star Wars desert shoot (see here) which has received international attention and the entire shoot was done on a 70D, proving again that it’s a capable, dependable higher-end APS-C DSLR and right now can be had for $999. It’s unlikely this price will drop further anytime in the near future, and it’s a great buy. Get it here. NikoN (Still Offering HUGE SALES ON FX CAMERAS) D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in...

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