Candid

Candid Photography has been one of the most enjoyed photography where people or things are clueless about the camera or the photographer. Most of the photographs presented in books, newspapers and historical images are candid photographs. It can also be called as a secret photography type which also comes under the rubric of photojournalism. Street photography and reaction photography falls under the candid photographic genre. Though it is the most popular genre, mastering candid photography takes years of practice in managing the speed, lights, flashes, moments etc. Candid photography captures all the uniqueness and natural facial expressions to have a very strong emotional impact.

Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Food, Photography Tips, portrait

Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography

In my career as a photographer I’ve covered many genres from studio product photography, editorial, industrial, food photography, weddings, portraits, fine art, and travel – but through all of that, I’m primarily a people photographer. I like to photograph people. Shoe repair man in Nicaragua – By Darlene Hildebrandt Model at sunset – By Darlene Hildebrandt Cuban beauties – By Darlene Hildebrandt Whether it’s in a studio environment doing a posed portrait, a candid doing street photography, a shop owner or vendor in a foreign country – people are always interesting and challenging to photograph. Weekly Photography Challenge – People We’ve got lots of articles to help you as you go about photographing people this week in fact it’s our feature topic right now. You can see all the ones we’ve done so far this week below, and watch for more people photography articles over the next few days: How to Take Low Key Head-shots How to Do a One Light Portrait Setup and Use it as Your Back-up Plan Travel People Photography – Tips and Pitfalls 8 Tips for Photographing Men 24 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography Nicaraguan school kids – By Darlene Hildebrandt Wedding fun – By Darlene Hildebrandt Cuban dancers – By Darlene Hildebrandt You can also check out our ebooks on people and portrait photography: Fast Flash for Portrait Perfection Portraits: Lighting the Shot Portraits: Making the Shot Portraits: Striking the Pose Kids Photography So if you are not inclined to photograph people and this challenges makes you a bit nervous – maybe now is the time to get out of your comfort zone and just do it. I promise they won’t bite! Share your images below: Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer upload them to your favourite photo sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge. Sometimes it takes a while for an image to appear so be patient and try not to post the same image twice. You can see some of mine here on this page – now it’s your turn to share, and show me your people photos. The post Weekly Photography Challenge – People Photography by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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28 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait

28 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography

People have a diverse range of emotions, styles, and looks and capturing that with a camera is the photographer’s job. From posed studio portraits, to street photography or candid shots, getting the character and essence of a person in an image is the goal. Let’s see how these photographers did with people photography: By United Nations Photo By Darlene Hildebrandt By Jim O’Connell By Darlene Hildebrandt By Shahab By Tyrone Daryl By Fouquier ? By Sebastian Rieger By Khánh Hmoong By Christopher Michel By astrid westvang By David Stanley By Eric Montfort By Chryssa Kotsanidou By T W I N K A By enki22 By Tilman Haerdle By Elena Penkova By Monique Prater By Ivan Constantin By Michael Salvato By Kannan Muthuraman By Hernán Piñera By Meena Kadri By Rod Waddington By Rod Waddington By Meena Kadri By Umberto De Peppo Cocco People photography week This week on dPS we’re featuring articles all about different kinds of people photography including portrait, event and travel photography. See all the previous ones below, and watch for more people photography articles over the next few days. How to Take Low Key Head-shots How to Do a One Light Portrait Setup and Use it as Your Back-up Plan Travel People Photography – Tips and Pitfalls 8 Tips for Photographing Men The post 28 Diverse Images That Showcase People Photography by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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Supercharge Your Spring With Motherhood Minis: 10 Ideas For Motherhood Photography Sessions

Posted by on Apr 12, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait

Supercharge Your Spring With Motherhood Minis: 10 Ideas For Motherhood Photography Sessions

Spring is a great time of year to offer mini-sessions and boost your bottom line. It’s finally warm enough to hold outdoor sessions every day, flowers are in bloom, and golden hour is late enough that it’s possible to have several shoots in the early evening. Many photographers suggest giving your mini-sessions a theme so that clients don’t book a shorter, less expensive mini-session as a substitute for a full one. Motherhood sessions are a great theme to offer with Mother’s Day around the corner. In Motherhood sessions, the focus is on Mom and her experience as a mother. A successful Motherhood mini-session can leave your clients itching to book you for a full family session later on. Photo: Mae Burke Motherhood mini-sessions could be a great way to fill your calendar between now and the end of May, or to fill in empty session slots through the summer with gift certificates for these sessions given as gifts on Mother’s Day. Some photographers find that they like Motherhood sessions so much that they offer them throughout the year. For some inspiration, check out Mae Burke and her Moments in Motherhood: Telling Mothers’ Stories Through Portraits breakout e-course at Click Photo School. Below are some ideas for getting started with Mother’s Day minis and Motherhood photography. Photo: Paulina Splechta Photography Nursing Sessions: For mothers of very young children, consider offering nursing sessions. Many mothers treasure their time nursing their children and offering photography sessions focusing on this aspect of motherhood will be highyl appealing. Beyond Mother’s Day, a nursing session is often something mothers like to document one year of breastfeeding. Inspiration: Paulina Splechta Photography‘s breastfeeding gallery. Photo: Mae Burke Babywearing: Another important part of motherhood for many mothers is babywearing. Keeping their babies close is a huge priority for some, and a few even spend thousands on special wraps and carriers. Documenting the special way that many mothers carry their little ones make for special photos that will help remember the hours of cuddling they had with their child, and many mothers carry their children well into toddlerhood. Inspiration: Tiny Sparrow Photography. Playing: If there is one requirement of motherhood, it’s being able to play for hours and hours, so it can be great to schedule sessions at a playground and document Mom playing with her children. If the idea of shooting in a playground gives you hives, choose a more laid-back location and bring a board game, bubbles, or books. For a more personalized session, ask Mom to bring along a favorite game or toy. Or keep it simple and photograph her playing tag, having a race, or giving airplane rides. For a more personalized session, ask Mom to bring along a favorite game or toy. Or keep it simple and photograph her playing tag, having a race, or giving airplane rides. Mae Burke suggests asking Mom to...

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5 Important Focal Lengths to Know and the Benefits of Each

Posted by on Apr 6, 2016 in Astrophotography, Bokeh, Candid, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips, portrait

5 Important Focal Lengths to Know and the Benefits of Each

Please note: all focal lengths mentioned in this article are in reference to 35mm full frame sensors. There are photographers that favor the convenience and flexibility of zoom lenses, and those that favor their sharper, lighter and cheaper counterpart, the prime lens. Note: some modern zooms do have prime-like optics. Often, it’s your line of work that will make that decision for you. Whichever variant you favor, you owe it to yourself to experiment with different focal lengths to learn where they each excel, and which ones mesh best with your style. You can achieve this with primes, or zooms if you can commit yourself to not touching that handy zoom barrel. Among the many options, five focal lengths you want to use are the: 24mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, and 135mm. Let’s look at each one at a time. #1 – 24mm wide angle Areas it excels in: landscapes, astrophotography, group portraits, and event photography. This one is easy to experiment with because not only are there many affordable prime options available, but you’ll find this focal length at the wide end of many full frame zoom lenses. The 24mm prime lens is sufficiently wide and remarkably sharp, making it an ideal candidate for landscape photography. Zooms are wonderful for landscape photography too, but the locked-in field of view (or a prime lens) will force you to think carefully about your compositions. The 24mm focal length also excels in situations that don’t offer a lot of light. That includes astrophotography, where 24mm lenses with wide apertures (f/.8 or wider) will facilitate shots of the milky way, and in event photography, where you’ll have an ample field-of-view to shoot indoors and add context to your photographs. Additionally, the 24mm focal length is sufficiently wide to capture group portraits with minimal perspective distortion. Just don’t get too close, and watch the edges of your frame. #3 – 35mm focal length Areas it excels in: street photography, events, environmental portraits, and shooting-across-the-dinner-table photography. 35mm is a classic focal length for many photojournalists. Part of that reason is that the field-of-view requires you to be close to the action, but still maintains enough of the environment surrounding your subject to give an image context. This same philosophy applies well to wedding or event photography, and makes the 35mm focal length a great fit. Another great thing about the 35mm prime lens is that it just so happens to be the perfect focal length for shooting a portrait from across the dinner table. Any wider and your subjects face will suffer from perspective distortion (exaggerating their facial features) and any narrower and you’d have to get out of your seat for the shot. #3 – 50mm (normal) lens Areas it excels in: street photography, full-body portraits, walk-around shooting. There are so many reasons to try shooting with a 50mm prime lens. Perhaps the best...

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Could Better White Balance & More Come From The New Auto-Colorize ability With Photoshop?

Posted by on Apr 2, 2016 in Candid, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop

Could Better White Balance & More Come From The New Auto-Colorize ability With Photoshop?

In the past few years we’ve seen photo retouching programs introduce some really remarkable abilities, and not just introduce them, but make them so accessible. Capture One allows us to color grade an image like Leibovitz with relative ease, and Lightroom, with the right presets, can make a fillet out of a rump-roast with a single click. Just pulling up Photoshop and seeing how well something like the healing brush tool works now (yes, it’s better than before), and then the algorithm that allows Photoshop to ‘stabilize’ an image rogered with camera shake are astonishing. PS will be leaping tall buildings with a single bound next… Of course with each new reveal and release with added functionality we welcome some change and we worry about others. Photographers, to a certain extent, are concerned with the automation of photography, and that we may be relatively redundant. I don’t see that really and even if it were the case there isn’t much to be done about it because it’s in the cause of moving forward, and humans, well, it’s just not in our nature to snuff out the fire. So what next? Auto-colorizing seems a likely candidate. Sure to a certain degree the ability for a computer to analyze and auto-color an image has been around for ages, but it’s hasn’t been that good, and it hasn’t been that easy. A UC Berkley Computer Vision PhD student Richard Zhang are about to change that, and are using a “convolutional neural network” to do it. But how good is it? Impressive. it stands apart from previous ways of achieving the result largely because it does it automatically, and in order to do that it references a rather massive cache of a million color photos as inputs, resulting in significantly more realistic images. So realistic in fact that in tests of real color photos and colorized photos people were fooled 20% of the time, and that rate, while it may not sound like much, is a significant leap. It’s interesting to note this, given the human eye, on average, can perceive about 1 million colors. The real question is, what is this going to do for consumers of photography and the creators of it? For one, as the tech develops even more, perhaps using a larger database, we may have the ability to colorize images from long ago, and learn more about our history – almost like a hidden message in images that already exist. We may be able to see the world as some of the great photographers had, and feel more present at momentous moments in history than ever, maybe generating compassion and solidarity. [REWIND: Best Computer Specs for Photoshop | Is Your Computer Up to Par?] From a photographers perspective, I’m not so sure, though I think it could hold great purpose in retouching once the tech becomes good enough....

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Documentary Photography: Adding Family Photojournalism Sessions To Your Portrait Business

Posted by on Mar 22, 2016 in Candid, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Documentary Photography: Adding Family Photojournalism Sessions To Your Portrait Business

Pretty portraits of families and children are a time-honored way for photographers to earn a living. But, increasingly photographers are searching for ways to allow their clients to capture what their lives are really like. This emerging genre of documentary photography or family photojournalism appeals to many clients who don’t want photos that make them look like they could be any family placed in a the middle of a field with some props. Instead, they want photos that show their unique personalities and the rhythm of their lives ranging from Sunday morning rituals, their favorite playground, to bedtime rituals. For photographers, offering Family Photojournalism sessions can be a challenge. To embrace family photojournalism, a photographer needs to be willing to let go of control over where sessions take place, the lighting, and time-tested poses. But, with some practice, offering Family Photojournalism sessions can help set you apart in your market and can help you learn how to make great photos even under the most challenging of circumstances. Kirsten Lewis is the godmother of Family Photojournalism and has presented two CreativeLive courses on the topic. Family Photography: Modern Storytelling and Family Photography: Photojournalism in the Home. Kirsten describes Family Photojournalism this way: “For me, I approach family photojournalism with the same respect for the code of ethics that a news photojournalist follows in the field. My goal is to document my families truthfully, honestly and objectively. I do not judge my subjects or their lifestyle; I simply photograph them without bias.” [REWIND: PHOTOJOURNALISM TIPS FOR GETTING THE PERFECT CANDID SHOT] Family Photojournalism is still very new, and different photographers may have different approaches. Kirsten shares her approach: Do not direct the subjects in any way. Be patient and believe that a great moment will happen on its own. Identify the clues that suggest that a great moment will happen, prepare for the moment ahead of time, and then wait for it to happen. Never direct clients or disturb the environment, this includes not moving any objects, altering light sources or opening doors or windows. Family photojournalism documents a specific family and should tell the story not just as the family as a whole but the story of their relationships with one another. It should also highlight each family member’s individuality and personality within the family dynamic. While traditional portraiture and lifestyle family photography requires the photographer to take most, if not all, of the control in regards to the moment, the environment, and the technical, family photojournalism frees the photographer of this so they can simply focus of all of their decision-making on technical choices and how they tell the story. When taking photographs, remember that it’s NOT about the activities in which the family is engaging, but rather how each member of the family interacts with one another while participating. Post processing is minimal, never adding or removing anything...

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