boudoir

The term “boudoir” may also be ascribed to a genre of photography. Boudoir photography is not generally a new concept and numerous examples including images of Clara Bow, Mae West and Jean Harlow photographed in a boudoir style from the 1920s through the 1940s. Typically shot in a photographer’s studio or luxury hotel suites, it has become fashionable to create a set of sensual or sexually suggestive images of women (and occasionally men and couples) in “boudoir style”. The most common manifestation of contemporary boudoir photography is to take variations of candid and posed photographs of the subject partly clothed or in lingerie. Nudity is more often implied than explicit. Commercially the genre is often (though not exclusively) derived from a market for brides to surprise their future husbands by gifting the images on or before their wedding day. Other motivations or inspiration for boudoir photography shoots include anniversaries, birthdays, Valentine’s Day, weight loss regimes, other form of body change or alteration (such as breast augmentation or reduction) and for servicemen and women overseas.

Five Perfect Posing Tips For Boudoir Photography

Posted by on Apr 22, 2016 in boudoir, Featured, Photography Tips, portrait

Five Perfect Posing Tips For Boudoir Photography

If you were looking for something sexy, you came to the right place. Don’t worry, this article is totally SFW (safe for workplace), but I am not promising it won’t tease you. Learning the subtle variations in hand gestures, looks, and body placement will diversify your portfolio and give you a better understanding of the nuances of posing. In general, one of the biggest mistakes photographers make is moving from scene to scene too quickly, without making adjustments to the posing of their subjects. The five different posing ideas presented here will help you pay attention to small details that make a huge difference. Conceal, Don’t Feel The most important thing we as photographers can take from Disney’s Frozen was the lesson, “Conceal, don’t feel.” After all, Elsa knows best. Odds are, if a hand’s placement doesn’t look natural, it will draw attention to the fact that the subject is concealing something (refer to the image above of our Dearest Pye). Place the subjects’ arms in a way to make it seem as though it wasn’t their intention to conceal. By doing so, you leave more to the viewer’s imagination and create thought-provoking imagery. Watch How the Hands Are Placed Since we are on the subject of hand placement, pay close attention to how your subject places their fingers on their body. You want to avoid stiff and tense “Barbie Hands” and you can do this by requesting that your subject shake out the tension in their fingers and softly place their hands on their body. It’s also good to note that bending at the wrist releases tension and eases the fingers to lay naturally. Once this has been addressed, place the hands where they would naturally be if the subject was to conceal their private parts and avoid mirroring arm placements at all costs. Relax The Lips Closing and pressing the lips together can have the effect of creating tension in the jaw line, and typically this isn’t what we’re going for. Instead, try having your subject open their lips, ever so subtly, to release tension and go for a softer look. Making this slight adjustment completely transforms the feel of a portrait, and the look of the subject. [REWIND: Boudoir Photography Tip | Breaking the Ice] Direct Where the Eyes Go If your subject desires a sexy, confident overall feel to the images, direct them to have their chin up and eyes looking down at the camera. This showcases a more domineering and powerful gaze. If it’s an innocent and ‘longing’ look that’s sought, direct their chin down and have them look up towards the camera. It’s good to note there that direct eye contact with the camera is the perfect posing idea for shots where you are peeking in on a scene (behind a door, through a curtain, etc), however for a voyeuristic image, have the...

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Make a Professional Wedding Album in Minutes With Fundy’s New Album Designer 7.0

Posted by on Apr 20, 2016 in boudoir, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait

Make a Professional Wedding Album in Minutes With Fundy’s New Album Designer 7.0

Back when I was photographing weddings every other weekend, it was common to find me editing late into the night after a full day of work at the day job. Then after hours of photo editing, I’d have to design the wedding album. For larger wedding packages, I’d hire a professional wedding album designer, but for the smaller weddings, it didn’t seem worth the extra money. Having no knowledge of how to navigate InDesign and only rudimentary knowledge of Photoshop, I ended up purchasing some wedding album design templates and painstakingly spent hours putting albums together. Oh, how I wish a professional wedding album design software like the newly released Fundy v7 were available back then… [REWIND: FUNDY ANNOUNCES NEW V7, HIGHLIGHTING NEW PROFESSIONAL AUTO ALBUM DESIGNER] Being someone who likes to just jump in and figure out things as I go – no instructions to guide me – I downloaded the beta version of Fundy Designer 7.0 software to see if it was really worth the hype. Fundy Designer 7.0 is the world’s first professional auto album designer, it is template-free but provides thousands of layout possibilities. That means I can choose the layout and then drag and drop my images in however I want them. Yes, drag and drop. This professional wedding album designer is going to change your life, wedding photographers; here’s how. (Note: The Fundy Album Designer can be used for more than just weddings. You can use it to design any type of album you wish). Image via Jay Cassario – http://www.twistedoaksstudio.com/ 1. Design a Professional Wedding Album In Minutes With The Auto-Design Feature No one has time these days. It’s a commodity in this a fast-paced world and with the amount of stuff we juggle as business owners, spouses, parents, etc. no one has the time nor the inclination to sit down and design an album – much less learn how to utilize InDesign or Photoshop to do so. I downloaded Fundy Designer 7.0, installed it (which took about 15 seconds) and opened it. The opening screen gave me the option of either choosing to have my album sent to one of the album companies on their list, design and export the album to the exact specifications preloaded in the Fundy system (there are 110+ labs and 3400 album sizes and specs within the system) or create a custom size if my album company or size wasn’t preloaded. No more digging through my preferred album company’s website and looking for the exact specs to use. I randomly chose BayPhoto, a lab I’ve used before to see what options popped up. The next screen asked me the size I wanted, they led me to choose the type of material, cover, etc. from an already populated list. So far, I’ve spent less than a minute within the design ecosystem and have used very little energy...

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Creative Studio Lighting: High Key Wrap Around With Grid

Posted by on Apr 14, 2016 in boudoir, canon, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, portrait

Creative Studio Lighting: High Key Wrap Around With Grid

I’m in love with light. I’m infatuated with a beautiful highlight and drawn to a mysterious shadow. I love the freedom and control of creating light that expresses my vision, mood or story whether in the studio or on location. After I first mastered traditional lighting setups, I sought to learn about more advanced, challenging or creative approaches to lighting. Upon researching, it seemed that there really were very few advanced or extremely creative tutorials, but instead only some behind the scenes. For this reason, I created my newly released, 135-page ebook, “Creative Studio Lighting Guide” with 30 creative studio lighting setups. This is your guide to creativity in the studio whether you are trying out a new modifier or using usual tools in an unusual way. I’d like to take a moment to walk you step-by-step through one of these setups from the free segment of my guide to show how basic studio lighting modifiers can be utilized for creative results. Lighting Gear Used 2 Profoto D1 Air 500 Watt Light 1 – Profoto 5 degree Grid Light 2 – Profoto 3x4ft Softbox Other Gear Used Cinefoil (optional) Avenger D600 boom arm Setup Light 1: Distance from subject: 9 inches Distance off center: 0 inches Height above eye level: 5 inches Power (F stops): F/11 Light 2: Distance from subject: 0 inches Distance off center: 0 inches Height above eye level: 0 inches Power (F stops): F/22 Camera Gear & Settings Camera: Canon 5D Mark III Lens: Canon 70-200mm 2.8 II at 130mm ISO: 100 Shutter Speed: 1/200 Aperture: 11 The goal of this setup is to create lighting that has both high key elements (glowing background) and dramatic shadows. This setup is perfect for a variety of subject matter whether portraits, beauty or even boudoir. The highlights allow you to define your subject’s form while the shadows establish the dramatic mood. Let’s take a look step-by-step at considerations for building this dramatic two-light setup. Step 1 First, place a strobe with softbox directly behind and against the subject to create a pure white background with highlights that wrap around the body and jawline. The closer you have the softbox to the subject, the more the light will wrap. Here a 3x4ft softbox has been utilized. You may alternatively light a white seamless paper to create a white background effect if this is what you prefer, or if shooting full length. For the beauty images I am creating, I want my subject as close to that softbox as possible and really love the wrapping highlights. Keep in mind that there are a few challenges when shooting into a light source. First, if you are using a large softbox, be sure to add the inner piece of diffusion to the softbox if it comes with your modifier. By adding this diffusion, you allow the light to spread out even...

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How to Leverage Local Businesses to Build Your Own

Posted by on Mar 16, 2016 in boudoir, Featured, Food, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait

How to Leverage Local Businesses to Build Your Own

I love it when readers contact me and ask questions (or post them in the comments) because it helps me know what to write about next. This week Lynn from England emailed with a question about the No Cavity Club I mentioned in a recent article, EASY EDIT: HOW TO CREATE A FILMIC MATTE PHOTO USING LIGHTROOM IN JUST TWO CLICKS. She wanted to know more about it and how it works for me as a photographer so she could approach her local dentists about it. I thought some of you might like to know more too, so I’m going to break it all down for you and give you some examples of how I partner with a few local businesses to build my portrait business. What is The No Cavity Club? First of all, I can’t take any credit for this brilliant marketing idea. The marketing director at the pediatric dentist my kids attend, KiDDS Dental, approached me about being their photographer for their once per month No Cavity Club. What’s the No Cavity Club? Basically, after each child has their regular checkup appointment, if their teeth were cavity free they get their name in a drawing. Once per month a name is drawn, and the winner gets a $25 gift card to a store of their choice (usually Toys R Us, Build-a-Bear Workshop, or Target) plus a free photo shoot with me. Their photo ends up being displayed in the office and published in the local newspaper for the month. So, how does this all work from a photography standpoint? The parents receive a letter in the mail with instructions to contact me if they are willing to allow their child to be photographed. The letter includes a media release to be signed for KiDDS Dental, explaining their image will be used in the local newspaper and wherever else KiDDS Dental wants to use it. I also have them sign a release for me the day of the shoot. Due to patient privacy laws, the dentist cannot give me the contact information of the winner, which is why the parents are asked to contact me themselves. If I don’t hear from them within a couple of weeks, I have the dentist office call them to see if they are interested. Once the parent contacts me, we set up a time and place to meet. I’ll generally ask a few questions about the child since ages can range anywhere from 12 months to 18 years. I like to know a little bit about them so I can be prepared. We usually meet at a local park or someplace fun. If the weather is bad, I’ve met them at the dentist office, at their home or in a rented a studio space. Of course, if you have a permanent studio, it would be time-saving and more cost efficient for...

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6 Reasons to Join SLR Lounge Premium

Posted by on Mar 15, 2016 in boudoir, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, portrait

6 Reasons to Join SLR Lounge Premium

We are incredibly excited to announce and officially launch SLR Lounge Premium, our new interactive educational platform! Launch Special The first 1,000 annual subscribers receive over $375 in resources, including our best-selling Lightroom Presets, our Web Marketing and SEO book, Paper Textures, Smoke Textures, and Cloud Pack. In addition, we’re including a one week launch special, bringing the total cost for an annual premium membership from $408 to $348. Signup: Here Intro Video Watch the video below or read the 6 reasons to join today! 1. Industry Leading Education Education for all levels – Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, we have tutorials to help you grow as a photographer. Maybe you’re trying to grasp basic concepts; or maybe you’re a professional looking to gain a full mastery of advanced technical concepts. No matter your experience level, we’re confident that you’ll benefit from our large and growing library of education. Upon launch, here are the titles included: Newest Workshop: Lightroom Crash Course (2016) Lighting 101 and Lighting 201 Photography 101 Newborn Photography Workshop Natural Light Couples Photography HDR Photography Workshop Lightroom Image Processing Mastery Lightroom Organization and Workflow The Earthen Bathtub | Fine Art Boudoir Tutorial 2. First Access to Latest Tutorials First Access – In addition, premium members get first access to our latest tutorials. Moving forward, as we complete each chapter of our new workshops, we upload the videos directly to the platform so you no longer have to wait until the entire workshop is complete. Upon launch, we will also give you access to the first chapters of the following courses (with more to be released on a regular schedule). Wedding Workshop Part 1 | Communication, Planning and Happy Clients – This is the first part of our 7 part series into Wedding Photography. Throughout 2016, we’ll be releasing the entire 7 part series of workshops. Advanced Lightroom CC Tutorials – This is the follow-up to the Lightroom Image Processing Mastery, with a focus on Lightroom CC and improved developing techniques. 3. Streaming Access from Any Device 24 Hour Access – SLR Lounge Premium allows members streaming access to our industry leading photography education from any device. So instead of waiting hours for large zip files to download, you can simply log in and start learning from your phone, desktop, laptop, or tablet. 4. Interactive Education Two-Way Education – What makes SLR Lounge truly unique and different from other platforms is our new interactive educational system. For a long time, online education has been one-way in that you watched a video, learned on your own, and that was it. In the new SLR Lounge, our tutorials are tied into the community through assignments, quizzes, and more. Assignments As you watch the workshops, you’ll have a chance to practice the techniques you learn and upload the results in the assignments section. These assignments are shared...

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Is Body Positivity A Photographer’s Responsibility?

Posted by on Feb 20, 2016 in boudoir, Fashion, Featured, Food, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Is Body Positivity A Photographer’s Responsibility?

[Editor’s Note: The following article is an opinion piece. The views expressed here by the writer may not necessarily the opinion of SLR Lounge as a whole]. It’s February, so 2016 is in full swing, and it’s going to be a big year for fashion, beauty, and by default, photographers – especially if you are in that line, or portraiture, or boudoir. Fashion statements and beauty trends for the year are generally set in these early months as Paris Fashion Week is around the corner in March, London Fashion Week is on now, and the highest volume single magazine issue, the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue has just been dropped. Between these three things alone, there are mountains to discuss, but above all, it’s body acceptance, and ‘skindividuality’. What this also means is that controversy is high. In case you missed the telegram, the low-hanging fruit of choice for alleged ‘body positivity’ promoters are the tall and thin models that strut catwalks and adorn magazines. These models have oft been villainized for promoting an unhealthy and unrealistic feminine ideal that has led to the physical and mental illnesses of many women who don’t match their image. In fact, it’s not only the models who are criticized, but more the brands that use them, and even the photographers that shoot and retouch them. With the acceptance of correlational effects from media like this versus causal there’s been a massive push over the last few years, and especially in 2015, to change the paradigm of the fashion and beauty world. France implemented legislation last year that effectively banned uber-thin models, requiring a doctor’s note to assert the models were in good health. Israel has done the same, and here in the UK, the same sort of thing seems imminent. Even Barbie, the very figure that was, according to M.G Lord, official Barbie Biographer, “To teach girls what – for better or worse – is expected of them in society,” now comes in numerous skin tones, petite, tall, and most notably, curvy. [Never mind that Barbie was actually based on a German doll named Lilli that was essentially a bachelor party favor given by and modeled after prostitutes…] Then, of course, there was the Pirelli Catalogue where Annie Leibovitz and Pirelli decided to forgo the historically sexualized power and skin bearing nature of the infamous publication to showcase women with a different type of power, and just this week, SI drops Ashely Graham as their biggest piece of PR fodder yet as their first featured plus sized model. It would be easy to join the heaving throngs and assert that this is a move in the right direction and even more needs to be done, because why would we want to promote any kind of unhealthy ideal for anyone? But there’s more to it – this year may prove it, and be an...

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