Bokeh

Bokeh, also called as the aesthetic photography is a photography that captures out-of-focus images. Specially used in capturing blur images, boken photography captures photographs that are outside the depth of focus. It has endless scope and can be used in capturing anything. Mostly, photographs love taking visible yet spectacular reflections of light sources in this form of photography. This has been regarded as the most creative form of photography. This form has also been used in making barcodes by scientists.

Writer’s Favorite Lens – the Canon 400mm f/2.8

Posted by on Mar 20, 2016 in Bokeh, canon, Featured, Photography Tips

Writer’s Favorite Lens – the Canon 400mm f/2.8

Being a sports photographer, covering things ranging from soccer (football) and rugby, to horse racing, I often have the Canon 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM on one of my camera bodies. It’s this lens’ focal length and fast aperture that is most helpful. I love this lens for its image quality and performance, but also its versatility. Image courtesy of Canon. So let’s have a look at the specs of this lens: Focal length: 400mm (560mm APS-C approximate) Maximum aperture: f/2.8 Maximum diameter x length: 163mm x 343mm (6.41 x 13.50″) Weight: 3.85 kg (8.48 lbs) Image stabilized? Yes, four stops Minimum focusing distance: 2.7m (8.85′) Weather sealed: Yes PROS Ideal Sports Lens The 400mm focal length of this lens is ideal for many field based sports such as soccer (football) and rugby as it’s not too long, such as a 500mm for example, but at the same time it’s gives more pull than a 300mm. Its fast f/2.8 aperture is very handy when photographing in low-light situations, such as at night matches where the light is often quite low, as it allows me to use a lower ISO and still be able to maintain a shutter speed that is fast enough to freeze the action. This maximum aperture is also ideal to nicely isolate the subject from a busy background and make them pop more. Although I don’t always shoot at f/2.8 (generally hovering around f/3.5-f/4) having the ability to use f/2.8 is quite handy. As far as focussing speed goes, this lens is blazingly quick and spot-on accurate, especially when coupled to a 1D X, for example. It easily locks on to a subject without any search or lag whatsoever. In the following images, the 400mm focal length has been fantastic at pulling the subject in closer than what a 70-200 or 300mm for example, would be able to offer. These images have still been cropped, but not as much as would be needed if I had used a shorter focal length. © Daniel Smith / Getty Images. © Daniel Smith / Getty Images. © Daniel Smith / Getty Images. © Daniel Smith / Getty Images. Versatility Being quite heavy and long, with no zoom, you may think that this lens would only be suited to use on the sidelines of a sports field, attached to a monopod. However, this lens is much more versatile than that. Being the series two version of this lens, it is significantly lighter than its predecessor. This reduction in weight means that I am now able to use this lens hand-held (if I’m using it for extended period of time, I do use a monopod; it’s not that light!) which opens up more options. For example, I have photographed live concerts with this lens; a lens that is rarely used because of its long focal length. But it’s this focal length,...

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26 Unique Special Effects Photos to Spark Your Creativity

Posted by on Mar 19, 2016 in Bokeh, Featured, Photography Tips

26 Unique Special Effects Photos to Spark Your Creativity

This week on dPS we are all about special effects. Check out the others that have already been published here: How to Photograph the Full Band of the Milky Way Fire Spinning with Steel Wool – A Special Effects Tutorial Special Effect – How to Create Multiple Flash Exposures in a Single Frame Stacking Light Trails for Night Photography Special Effects Now it’s time to look at some special effects images: By i am dabe By Redfishingboat (Mick O) By Mike Boening Photography By Neil Howard By Terry Lawson By Louish Pixel By Taichiro Ueki By Thierry Marysael By John Watson By Nick Kenrick By Martin Heigan By Mibby23 By Mickaël By inefekt69 By Knowsphotos By Disco’s Place By Dennis Crabtree By Wayne Stadler By liz west By TJ Gehling By Alex Matravers By Howard Ignatius By David Bokeh By Randy McRoberts By Manuel Paul By Alex Matravers The post 26 Unique Special Effects Photos to Spark Your Creativity by Darlene Hildebrandt appeared first on Digital Photography School.        Share...

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Wide Angle Versus Telephoto Lenses for Beautiful Landscape Photography

Posted by on Mar 13, 2016 in Bokeh, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips

Wide Angle Versus Telephoto Lenses for Beautiful Landscape Photography

An easy assumption to make, when shooting landscapes, is use a wide angle lens. After all, most landscape photographers favor wide angle lenses for a reason, they naturally give you the widest view and allow you to get the full landscape into the frame, from the foreground to the horizon. They have the widest depth of field, so you get the whole landscape in focus too. Their distortion enlarges objects in the foreground, letting you show off close-up details. The same distortion also emphasizes leading lines, enhancing your composition, and giving your image a more dynamic feel. But when you default to wide angle, you miss many hidden opportunities offered by telephoto lenses. Field of View: The Whole and its Parts This is the most basic difference between the two lens types: wide lenses give you a wide view, telephoto lenses give you a narrow view. And while landscapes look great in their entirety, it’s a good habit to take a moment and look for details. These are beautiful elements of the landscape that might get shrunken, or ignored in the expanse of a wide-angle image. This is where your telephoto lens comes in. Its narrow field of view is perfect for trimming off the extra elements, and focusing right on small, beautiful scenes like the curve of a mountain, a reflection in a far-off pond, or the silhouette of a tree. In the two images above, you can see this in action. They were both taken from Olmstead point in Yosemite National Park, one with a wide angle lens and the other with a telephoto. In the first image, the wide angle shows off the total landscape. It includes both sides of the valley, the up-close textures of the rocks and the far off peak of Half Dome. In the second image, the telephoto lens brings the eye right up to the mountains, showing off their shapes and the details of the geology. Another pair of images (below), shows this effect even more dramatically. The first image is not just wide-angle, but an aerial shot as well, taken from a small airplane over the Okavango Delta in Botswana. From this vantage point all of the individual elements of the landscape become incredibly small, and your eyes pay more attention to their arrangement than their individual shapes. In the second image, also from the Okavango area, but this time on the ground, a telephoto lens is used to draw attention to the beautiful curves of a single Acacia tree. Depth of Field: Focusing the Eye The second major difference between wide angle and telephoto lenses is the innate size of their depth of field. Put succinctly, the higher the focal length, the narrower the area of focus. In practice, this means that when shooting wide, it’s much easier for you to get everything in focus, from the grass at...

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Lightroom’s Dark Knight |The Alt/Opt Key Transforms Lightroom In Ways You Likely Don’t Know [Part 1]

Posted by on Mar 13, 2016 in Bokeh, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait

Lightroom’s Dark Knight |The Alt/Opt Key Transforms Lightroom In Ways You Likely Don’t Know [Part 1]

If you were to gather up a group of photographers (let’s say all of you reading this), and asked them what they’d change about Lightroom, what they dislike about it, what makes them at times ponder the cost: satisfaction ratio of beating the bejesus out of their computer, you’d end up with a list as long as Sarah Jessica Parker’s face – like poking fun at everyone’s favorite blonde pony, it’s good sport if you like shooting fish in a barrel. But if you asked the same group what they really loved in Lightroom or at least a feature they couldn’t do without, the list would be considerably shorter. Now, of course, as a species we have a tendency to devote more time and expel more energy spitting fire and venom when we really don’t like something than when we do, but also, Lightroom just does a lot that we just sort of expect it to, so we are hardly grateful for things we expect, or are used to. Familiarity can breed contempt and a sense of entitlement or at the very least a drought of appreciation. When something new is introduced, however, things are a little different. But what if I told you that there is, and bear with me here on the hyperbole, but a whole new/secret world within Lightroom that you currently have, that many of you just aren’t aware of? Because there is, and it’s the one thing on the list I’d say I couldn’t do without in LR, and it may just give you a whole new appreciation for it by way of a transformed user experience. It’s the alt/opt key. (crickets) Yes, it’s the alt/opt key and the absolute versatility it brings to Lightroom. There’s a good chance many of you know at least one process application for the alt/opt key within Lightroom that you either stumbled upon in use or were told, but in fact, that single key is a pivot point for Lightroom’s menus and tools at which they can pirouette on a dime to work in a completely different manner than what is at first obvious, or apparent. There’s so much to it that I’m going to break this up into two posts, or more. I’ll get you going with some of the more instantly gratifying and broadly applicable ways in which to use the key, then push deeper. So, on that note, tally ho… Alt/Opt To Recalibrate/Reset Open any of these images in a new window to see them larger This may be the use that you’ll get the most ‘use’ out of on a regular basis, not that it’s the most valuable, but in terms of easing workflow, it bows to few others. If you’re in the Develop module, and you’re working away to introduce your own creative vision into your images, tweaking sliders as if your livelihood...

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Olympus 25mm F/1.2, LAOWA 105MM F/2, Great Vintage Lenses Under $80 {Daily Roundup}

Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 in Bokeh, canon, Featured, nikon, pentax, Photography Tips, sony

Olympus 25mm F/1.2, LAOWA 105MM F/2, Great Vintage Lenses Under $80 {Daily Roundup}

Welcome to our roundup series where we will hit on several gear news and rumor topics each day. This gives you a chance to get caught up on all of the day’s news and rumors in one place. Make sure to check back daily for the latest gear news, rumors, and announcements. Olympus F/1.2 Announcement Will Be 25mm We have talked about this Olympus F/1.2 lens series rumor a few times now over the last several months, and today we finally have an idea what the first lens in this new series will be. According to a new report over on 4/3 Rumors, which cites a reliable and credible source, the first lens in this upcoming F/1.2 lens series will be a 25mm. I think that is a good choice; it’s fairly wide and is also pretty much interchangeable with the popular 24mm focal length. The question now is, will this be a full frame lens as some of the rumors have suggested, or will this be a micro four thirds lens? Personally, I would love to see Olympus make some full frame E-mount lenses, but I fully admit that is sort of a far-fetched idea at this point. Regardless, this F/1.2 lens series from Olympus looks to be off to a good start, and I am excited to see what comes next. Venus Optics Announces New Laowa 105mm F/2 Our friends over at Venus Optics have a new lens announcement for us this morning, in the form of the new Laowa 105mm F/2 Smooth Trans Focus Lens. Smooth trans focus may not mean anything to you, but basically, this is similar to Fuji’s 56mm APD F/1.2 lens. This means that your bokeh is smoother, creamier if you will. The lens features 11 elements in 8 groups, with the key feature being that apodization element, which is responsible for the smooth and creamy bokeh the lens is hoping to be known for. The new lens will retail in the US for $699 and is going to come in Canon, Nikon, Sony A, Sony E, and Pentax K mount options. You can check out some sample images shot with the lens below: The new lens can be pre-ordered now over on the Venus website for those of you interested in giving this new lens a try. Three Vintage Lenses Under $80 Caleb Pike from DSLR Video Shooter has another great video out this week, this time featuring three vintage film lenses that are great for video that you can find each for under $80. I have one of the Olympus 50mm F/1.8 lenses that he mentions in this video, and I can confirm that it is everything he says it is. I absolutely love it, and it’s dirt cheap on eBay as well. What are your thoughts on today’s roundup? What news/rumors did we miss? What would you like to...

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Bokehrama – shallow depth of field with big photos

Posted by on Mar 11, 2016 in Bokeh, Featured, Photography Tips

Bokehrama – shallow depth of field with big photos

As a self-taught photographer I am continuously seeking creative and technical inspiration, and when I find a technique that involves both technical know-how and demands creative juice I can’t wait to go try it myself. When I first encountered the Bokehrama technique, sometimes referred to as the Brenizer method, I knew this is one of […] The post Bokehrama – shallow depth of field with big photos appeared first on DIY Photography.        Share...

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