Astrophotography

Astrophotography is a very specialized and high cost photographic genre aimed at capturing images of astronomical objects in the space. Used mostly for scientific researches this photographic genre is very much popular among space researches and scientists. Capturing of several new stars, nebula, planets and studying their details has been made possible because of astrophotography. However, this genre can be done using automatic robots or time sets which makes it a little easier. Several optical telescopes and astronomical CCD cameras are used with sensors in their to capture astronomical objects in the space.

Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 16, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Huge Savings On Canon & Nikon Full Frame DSLRs & 50% Off Memory Cards (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved and used the world over. If you’re in the market it’s $300 off the normal price sitting at $2,499, and can get that here. However, in addition to that you can get this bundle for $2,749 with rebate that includes: Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR Camera Body Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 Lens Canon Speedlite 430EX II Flash Canon PIXMA PRO-100 Professional Photo Inkjet Printer Lowepro Nova Sport 17L AW Shoulder Bag, Slate Gray Sandisk Extreme 32GB microSDHC Class 10 UHS-I Memory Card That’s quite a rounded kit, and not around for long. Get it here while still available. CANON 7D MK II With a 20MP refined APS-C sensor with dual pixel AF, the 7D MK II quickly became an item to get for many pros and enthusiasts. It’s got a rugged shutter designed for 200,000 actuations, a whopping 65 point AF system, and full 1080p at 60FPS. It’s one of the really attractive offerings from Canon and now is $300 less than normal sitting at $1,499 and even bundled with Lightroom. Get it here. Canon 70D We recently featured a Star Wars desert shoot (see here) which has received international attention and the entire shoot was done on a 70D, proving again that it’s a capable, dependable higher-end APS-C DSLR and right now can be had for $999. It’s unlikely this price will drop further anytime in the near future, and it’s a great buy. Get it here. NikoN (Still Offering HUGE SALES ON FX CAMERAS) D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in...

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Nikon Full Frame Cameras At Discounts Up to $700, & More Savings From Canon & Sigma (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 10, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Nikon Full Frame Cameras At Discounts Up to $700, & More Savings From Canon & Sigma (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading this you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them with you: NikoN D610 The Nikon D610 is the Nikon ‘entry’ full frame camera, and is probably one of the best buys for those wanting to get into full frame since it came out. It is, in fact, my workhorse of choice, and despite the agility and speed of it’s big brother the D750, the D610 remains a staple for many pro photographers, and coming in now at $1,296, a cool $700 less than typical list, it’s an exceptional buy. You can see our full review here, and get yours here. NIKON D810 The D810 is one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. There’s a reason for that: With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in a robust body, competitively priced, it’s now an industry staple for many. You can see our full review here, and right now you can score one for $500 off dropping the price from $3,296 to $2,796. It’s the largest savings we’ve seen on the D810 to-date. Get it here. D750 This is the jackknife DSLR at the moment and the one I found almost no fault in when reviewing it (full review here). With its 24MP sensor, low light capability, extended exposure comp, speed, and video capability it made you stop to wonder if you really needed a D810, and if you didn’t need the extra resolution, this was your answer. Typically $2,296, it’s currently going for $1,996 for a $300 break in price. Get it here. D5300 The Nikon D5000 sparked a bit of a small revolution because the series was so small, and so capable, and adopted much from its much larger more expensive brothers. The D5300 is a highly capable camera, and the series is one we refer to in our Photography 101 workshops because they are so good, and for so little. With 39 AF points, 24MP CMOS sensor, built in wi-fi and GPS, no optical low pass filter, and 1080p video at 60fps, it’s impressive. Typically listed at $1,096, it can be had right now for only $796, shaving $300 off the list. Get it here. Canon CANON 5D MK III The venerable 5D’s third iteration comes from a lineage whose reputation precedes it, and is loved the world over. It can be found along the sidelines at major sporting events, weddings,...

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Nikon D810 For $500 Off, D750 Is $300 Off, 25% Off CreativeLive, & More (Deal Dash)

Posted by on Apr 7, 2016 in Astrophotography, canon, Fashion, Featured, macro, nikon, Photography Tips, portrait, Portraiture

Nikon D810 For $500 Off, D750 Is $300 Off, 25% Off CreativeLive, & More (Deal Dash)

If you’re reading these words you’re aware that in our field, gear matters, and you’d have to have a bank balance bigger than your bank account number for you to acquire all you likely would want when the whim takes you. However, if you keep your ear to the ground like we do, you come about the best photography deals currently on the market, and within our Deal Dashes, we share them CreativeLive CreativeLive is, for the one or two of you who don’t know, a massive online education powerhouse that broadcasts live classes from leaders in their respective fields all around the world. Those classes span the gamut of the photographic field and cover varying degrees of education for photographers of all levels. Associated with CL are names like Chase Jarvis, Sue Bryce, Zack Arias, and our own Pye Jirsa. SLR Lounge is proud to partner with CreativeLive and offer a new customer promotion offer. Using the code CLNEW20, all new customers will be able to get 20% off your order! There’s never been a better time to tap into what CreativeLive’s got in store, but hurry as the offer for 20% off New Customer Orders expires on April 8th. Gear Deals It’s one of those times where there are huge savings to be had on some of the best and most sought after gear on the market, like the Nikon D810, D750, and a host of other cameras and lenses. Here are some of the very best with the biggest savings. *Keep in mind the deals presented may have varying dates of expiry. NIKON D810 The D810 can surely be called one of the most accomplished cameras to come to market in recent memory, with wide adoption from wedding photographers, fashion photographers, portrait shooters, architectural and the rest. With 36MP, no optical low pass filter, 51 point AF system and in a robust body, competitively priced, it’s now an industry staple for many. You can see our full review here, and right now you can score one for $500 off dropping the price from $3,296 to $2,796. It’s the largest savings we’ve seen on the D810 to-date. Get it here. NIKON D750 This is the jackknife DSLR at the moment and the one I found almost no fault in when reviewing it (full review here). With its 24MP sensor, low light capability, extended exposure comp, speed, and video capability it made you stop to wonder if you really needed a D810, and if you didn’t need the extra resolution, this was your answer. Typically $2,296, it’s currently going for $1,996 for a $300 break in price. Get it here. CANON 50MM F/1.2 Certainly one of the more famous of the Canon lenses, the 50mm f/1.2L gained even more notoriety in the past 2 years as being the go-to lens of wildly successful Humans Of New York photographer...

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5 Important Focal Lengths to Know and the Benefits of Each

Posted by on Apr 6, 2016 in Astrophotography, Bokeh, Candid, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips, portrait

5 Important Focal Lengths to Know and the Benefits of Each

Please note: all focal lengths mentioned in this article are in reference to 35mm full frame sensors. There are photographers that favor the convenience and flexibility of zoom lenses, and those that favor their sharper, lighter and cheaper counterpart, the prime lens. Note: some modern zooms do have prime-like optics. Often, it’s your line of work that will make that decision for you. Whichever variant you favor, you owe it to yourself to experiment with different focal lengths to learn where they each excel, and which ones mesh best with your style. You can achieve this with primes, or zooms if you can commit yourself to not touching that handy zoom barrel. Among the many options, five focal lengths you want to use are the: 24mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, and 135mm. Let’s look at each one at a time. #1 – 24mm wide angle Areas it excels in: landscapes, astrophotography, group portraits, and event photography. This one is easy to experiment with because not only are there many affordable prime options available, but you’ll find this focal length at the wide end of many full frame zoom lenses. The 24mm prime lens is sufficiently wide and remarkably sharp, making it an ideal candidate for landscape photography. Zooms are wonderful for landscape photography too, but the locked-in field of view (or a prime lens) will force you to think carefully about your compositions. The 24mm focal length also excels in situations that don’t offer a lot of light. That includes astrophotography, where 24mm lenses with wide apertures (f/.8 or wider) will facilitate shots of the milky way, and in event photography, where you’ll have an ample field-of-view to shoot indoors and add context to your photographs. Additionally, the 24mm focal length is sufficiently wide to capture group portraits with minimal perspective distortion. Just don’t get too close, and watch the edges of your frame. #3 – 35mm focal length Areas it excels in: street photography, events, environmental portraits, and shooting-across-the-dinner-table photography. 35mm is a classic focal length for many photojournalists. Part of that reason is that the field-of-view requires you to be close to the action, but still maintains enough of the environment surrounding your subject to give an image context. This same philosophy applies well to wedding or event photography, and makes the 35mm focal length a great fit. Another great thing about the 35mm prime lens is that it just so happens to be the perfect focal length for shooting a portrait from across the dinner table. Any wider and your subjects face will suffer from perspective distortion (exaggerating their facial features) and any narrower and you’d have to get out of your seat for the shot. #3 – 50mm (normal) lens Areas it excels in: street photography, full-body portraits, walk-around shooting. There are so many reasons to try shooting with a 50mm prime lens. Perhaps the best...

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How to Photograph Stars | 7 Essential Night Photography Tips

Posted by on Mar 15, 2016 in Astrophotography, Featured, Photography Tips

How to Photograph Stars | 7 Essential Night Photography Tips

Look up at the sky on a clear night with minimal light pollution and you’ll see a blanket of stars. It’s magical and mind-blowing to think just how far away those stars really are. But get out your camera and take a long exposure, and you’ll see that what you saw with your eye was only part of the real picture. The night sky lights up with billions of stars everywhere, creating some sort of scene you’d expect to see from a spaceship. If you’re new to photographing stars, there are a few things you should know. Here are six tips to get you started. 1. Use Infinity to Focus The most important part about successfully photographing the stars is to get your focus correct. There are so many star photos being shared online where they’re just not in focus. If your lens has a manual focus ring and indicator, ensure that you turn this to exactly infinity ∞. This will bring the stars into pin-sharp focus. If your lens doesn’t have this ring, or you find that the infinity symbol doesn’t actually focus precisely on stars (this can be the case with some lenses), then you’ll need to do this manually. You can do this in the daylight, focusing manually on the horizon, or very distant hills or similar. Use the Live View function and zoom in on the LCD to check the precise focus point. Once you’ve obtained focus, mark the lens where you need to focus to. Or go one step further. If you have a lens dedicated to astrophotography, such as the Samyang 14mm f/2.8, then find this point and tape the focus ring down with heavy duty tape. This will stop it from ever moving again, meaning you can take your lens out the bag and start shooting straight away without having to first fumble around in the dark obtaining focus. Just be sure to double-check that focus is still on stars if you find yourself shooting in extreme cold or heat, though. 2. Beware of Star Trails There comes a point when a long exposure starts to record the rotation of the Earth, blurring your stars and making them become trails. This varies depending on your focal length and the angle of the stars to the celestial equator. The latter is less important, but if you want to be really precise, then you can calculate this as well. A great way to work all this out is to use the PhotoPills calculator. It’ll tell you the longest exposure you can record before you start seeing star trails for your focal length. As a general rule, you might get good results by shooting at no longer than 20-30 seconds when using an ultra-wide lens like a 14mm, or at 4-8 seconds when using a medium lens like a 50mm. 3. Pay Attention to Light...

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Why Asking What Camera Settings Were Used is Not as Helpful as You Think

Posted by on Mar 10, 2016 in Astrophotography, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips

Why Asking What Camera Settings Were Used is Not as Helpful as You Think

When you view an image that you love, do you find yourself asking, “What camera settings did the photographer use?” This is a common question, that overlooks other important aspects which would have helped to create that image, such as the lighting conditions, and any post-processing techniques involved. As you become more experienced, and progress in your journey as a photographer, you may begin to realize that the things you originally obsessed over, may not be as important as you once thought. For this image I used a shutter speed of 1/5th, as this would blur out the background quite nicely, as I panned with the rider to make him pop out more. This meant I had to increase my aperture to f/10, and could also decrease my ISO to ISO 320, too. © Daniel Smith / Getty Images. A topic that many photographers are caught up in, is knowing which camera settings were used; more specifically, aperture, shutter speed and ISO. Any photographer will tell you that these three elements of exposure are very important in creating the desired image. If you use the wrong combination of these in any given environment, you could very well end up with undesired results. Keeping that in mind, it is completely understandable why new photographers obsess over knowing exactly which camera settings were used. In theory, this should help you to recreate that particular image, right? Unfortunately this may not be the case. Images are created from much more than just the correct combination of aperture, shutter speed and ISO. These three fundamentals do more than just control the exposure; they also give us a creative language to use in our images. In this image, I wanted to show some motion in the gymnast’s movements, rather than taking another frozen frame. To do this I lowered my shutter speed from 1/1000th to 1/15th. This reduction meant I could also lower my ISO from ISO 3200 to ISO 500 and increase my aperture to f/7.1. But before diving into this further, let’s explore the two different perspectives of this question; firstly from the point of view of a beginner, who would hope to replicate this imagine. They may assume that by knowing the exact camera settings, and dialling them into the camera, that they will somehow magically achieve the same result. Looking at this from an experienced photographer’s perspective, they may ask this question but with a different scope in mind. It may be when they are perplexed as to the techniques behind a particular image, or in relation to a very specific genre in photography, such as astrophotography, where knowing the settings may help provide a breakthrough. So why is the question unhelpful? This question will not always equip you with the knowledge you need, to recreate that image, or with your endeavours of becoming a more successful photographer. There is...

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