Food Photography Tips & ‘How Tos’ From A Young Instagram Dominating Photographer

Posted by on Apr 9, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Fashion, Featured, Food, lightroom, nikon, Photography Tips, photoshop

Food Photography Tips & ‘How Tos’ From A Young Instagram Dominating Photographer

In the same menu, click “Reverse Frames” to obtain the right order. Adjust the timing to your specifications To export: GIF: File >> Export >> Save for Web mp4: File >> Export >> Render Video [REWIND: I know someone who recently compared photographers to possible suitors for dating. She said she has trouble finding someone because people tend to be relatively one-dimensional, or at least easily pigeonholed. He could be handsome and athletic, but then what if he wasn’t funny? The good looking ones rarely are, she claims, “God doesn’t give with both hands.” Now, I don’t know about all that, but it was an interesting comparison because in photography you tend to be defined by what you shoot, and known for that genre: If you’re a fashion photographer you’re typically not considered to cover Wimbledon. Betty Liu, is a bit of an anomaly that way. Her bread and butter is wedding photography, a vocation both she and her husband are accomplished at, but on the side, so-to-speak, she’s a food photographer, and that’s a bit of a problem. So let me swivel the Rubik’s cube of your day and explain how this is odd, and it’s because wedding photographers don’t usually have images on Instagram that get millions of views, and hundreds of thousands of likes – of food. Betty, trailing streamers of success behind her, has managed to not only become great at more than one genre, but to become highly marketable in both. She and I spoke last night about her work, and she’ shared her story, her gear, and how she leveraged Lightroom presets (her own) and a simple technique to gain massive traction. She even breaks down how to do it. Photography Gear Nikon Bodies Mostly (but it changes)Leica M9 Contax 645 Medium Format Film Film Of choice: Fuji 400H Betty’s voice and vocal demeanor are reflective of the presence she has online. She’s soft spoken but well spoken; unpretentious and unassuming; eclectic and unapologetic about it. Perhaps the last part comes from being American of Chinese heritage from California now residing in Boston. A photo posted by betty | (@bliu07) on Mar 9, 2016 at 9:05am PST Her food photography work, however, strikes more a European vibe than American. It’s moody, often dark with soft directional light, and an almost monastic environment. The look of her images is from a Lightroom preset she and her husband created from their experience with wedding photography, and it’s reminiscent of film, as many are. If it’s a look you like the SLR Lounge Preset System can achieve similar results with a single click. In fact, her film of choice is Fuji 400H, and the SLRL system has a 1-click 400H preset. Find it here And as many of you may know, Instagram has been making a major push for video in the last year, introducing view...

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Photographer Erik Johansson Shatters Reality In Latest Surreal Image [BTS]

Posted by on Apr 9, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait

Photographer Erik Johansson Shatters Reality In Latest Surreal Image [BTS]

You can do a lot of mind-bending effects in Photoshop these days with a few clicks of a button and many hours of retouching. Though Photoshop is part of his process, Swedish photographer Erik Johansson prefers to create his images as realistically as possible, which means photographing as many real, physical objects as possible, then using Photoshop to put all the pieces together without the use of CGI. Johansson begins with an idea, and from there it’s a puzzle for him to solve – how to get all the various elements to come together as realistically as possible. Johansson tells Creator’s Project, “It takes just as much time to do something in real life as it does trying to ‘fake it’ in Photoshop, so I just thought it would be more fun to do it for real.” [REWIND: WHEN PORTRAITS & LANDSCAPES COLLIDE: THE HDR COMPOSITES OF PATRICK KNECHT] His latest project, ‘Impact’ is a personal project that took months to create. The image is of a lake that cracks and breaks apart as it reaches land. To create the effect of the broken mirror, Johansson purchased 17 square meters of mirrors and broke them into pieces. Then he took the mirrors, a model, and a small fishing boat to a remote area to shoot the scenes. In Photoshop, Johansson then took various images and composited them all together – a total of 196 layers – which you can see in the 6-minute video below. According to the video notes, the image was shot on a Hasselblad H5D-40, edited on an Eizo CG318-4k monitor with Adobe Photoshop, and filmed with 4k GoPro. You can see more of Erik Johansson’s amazing work on his website here and follow him on Instagram. [Via The Creator’s Project]       Share...

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Using Cloud Overlays and Textures to Create a Composite Photo Illustration

Posted by on Mar 26, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, canon, Fashion, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop

Using Cloud Overlays and Textures to Create a Composite Photo Illustration

I have a confession to make. I have never used a cloud overlay. Well, not before I started experimenting with them for this image anyway. When SLR Lounge released their Cloud Pack, I thought, “Oh, that might be kind of fun to play around with.” Blown out, boring, cloudless skies are often something I deal with, especially when shooting with natural light only. A cloud overlay can be a simple solution to adding a little interest to the sky. There are several tutorials on our site for adding a simple cloud overlay to engagement and wedding photos (I’ll include links at the end of the article), but today I wanted to show you how to do something a little more involved and fun. I’ll show you, step by step, how to create this Little Witch Composite Photo Illustration in Photoshop. Materials Needed Camera (I used a Canon 5D Mark III) Lens (I used a Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L) Adobe Lightroom and/or Photoshop Graphics Tablet & Pen (I use a Wacom Intuos Pro Medium) SLR Lounge Cloud Pack SLR Lounge Photoshop Paper Texture Collection Getting Started First things first, you’ll need to take your photograph! I wanted to do something cute and fun with my daughter, so we grabbed a bunch of props and headed out to the lake in my neighborhood. It was cold (like super cold) and wet, so she didn’t last long, but we got some shots I could play with. When I got home, I loaded the photos into Adobe Lightroom, chose a favorite and applied the basic color, contrast and other adjustments I usually make using the SLR Lounge Lightroom Preset System. In a few quick and easy clicks, my image was ready to go. Then I opened it up in Adobe Photoshop. Straightening the Horizon Line Next, I copied my layer and straightened the horizon line. I do this the old fashioned way by dragging a line down from the rulers, hitting command-T, and dragging the little center axis marker over to the edge of the line. Then I mouse over a corner of the image and rotate it until the horizon line is straight. Next, you have two choices. You can either crop out the parts of the image that are showing some of the original behind it, or you can merge the two layers and then do a little cloning to preserve more of the background. I chose to do the latter because I didn’t want to crop in too tightly to the feet. You can see here that the sand has a weird pattern look from the rotation, so I used some careful cloning to disguise that. The key to cloning textures so they look “real” is to make sure you’re not seeing patterns anywhere within the texture. Read more about using the clone stamp tool by clicking here. Choosing the Right...

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Stacking Light Trails for Night Photography Special Effects

Posted by on Mar 18, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop

Stacking Light Trails for Night Photography Special Effects

In Melbourne there is an intersection that’s iconic for taking light trails phtos. It is the corner of Flinders Street and Swanston Street, in front of Flinders Street Station. Light Trails in front of Flinders Street Station. There are 23 images in this stacked light trail. It isn’t a hard image to take, you just need a camera and a tripod. To get a really good photo, you want to pick a time when there is going to be a lot of traffic. You want the traffic to be moving, as cars caught in a traffic jam will not give you the light trails you’re after. The cars need to be moving constantly, and not standing still for too long. Pick a place that you think will give you the best advantage. Set the camera up on the tripod, and try to take as long of an exposure as you can. To get the trails, you need to have exposures for several seconds, up to 30. You could do them for longer, but you would need other equipment (like a neutral density filter to cut the light). Most of the images shot for this article had an exposure of around eight to 10 seconds. Sounds fairly easy, but there are many things that can make it hard. The time of year can inhibit you, as daylight savings will affect when the best time for traffic is, and how busy the roads are. If you go to a place on the weekend, you might find there aren’t as many cars as there would be during the week. To get the light trails in front of Flinders Street Station, you need to be there at dusk, or after the sun has gone down. In summer that means not many cars or trams. However, there are ways to get around that. Stacking Light Trails One of the best ways to get light trails, is to stack many images together. From the intersection that was mentioned previously, the corner in front of St Paul’s Cathedral is the most popular. There are other places, but that seems to be the one that most use. You will have to work out a great place to photograph them where you live. A single image, and as you can see there aren’t that many light trails. Set your camera up on the tripod, this is necessary so you will get identical photos. Set the aperture to what you want. The ISO can be low, on 100 or 200, so you can get longer exposures. If you want longer, remember you can put your aperture to the smallest possible, like f/22. Once you have a shutter speed that is several seconds, it is time to start taking your photos. Take one photo, then repeat until you have at least 10. You can do this with as many images...

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Ideas to Inspire Your Next Double Exposed Photograph

Posted by on Mar 17, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Featured, landscape, Photography Tips, photoshop, portrait

Ideas to Inspire Your Next Double Exposed Photograph

Double exposed images are the type of photos that make you do a double-take.They are captivating, evocative, and they invite you in for a closer look. Just like comedies and dramas are both genres of movies, double-exposed photographs are a genre of photography. Double exposure occurs from the additive exposure of two images. The idea is that the brightness of one image is added to the brightness of the other. So when overlaying a bright image over the dark parts of another, the overlaid image will either cut or texture through the dark contours of the base image. This style of photography used to be an intricate process that could be done on film, either within the camera or in the darkroom by developing two exposures in one frame. However, this process required a lot of planning—getting the frames to match up perfectly was rather tedious. Now, old 35mm cameras are a thing of the past, and the majority of digital cameras currently on the market don’t have this built-in feature. Fortunately, in today’s digital world, we can easily superimpose two digital images with a little help from photo editing software. Adobe Photoshop has a large arsenal of tools that can help create and enhance double-exposed images, but there are many other similar photo editing programs available, like Pixlr, GIMP or Paintshop Pro to name a few. Image Blending Process The process of making a basic double-exposed image in a photo editing software like Photoshop is simple. First, you need to select your images. The base image can be anything of your choosing. However, if you are just starting out, a dark base image with a rather neutral background and minimal details are good guidelines to follow. Dark portrait shots are commonly used for the base. The second photo is the brighter image that gets layered on top of the base image. This image can be anything that is abstract or has lots of intricate details or texture. Landscape photos, flowers, clouds, forestry, trees or urban architecture are a few examples. Blending the Photos Once you have selected your images, you can open them in your photo-editing software. You can then copy and paste and move your second photo on top of the base photo so that they are on the same canvas. In Photoshop, select the second photo layer in the Layers panel and change the Blending Mode from ‘Normal’ to ‘Screen.’ This setting creates the double exposure effect right before your eyes! Keep in mind, this is just a basic approach and there are many methods and adjustments that can be done to make a truly unique double-exposed photograph. The more you experiment with the tools and effects, the more creative your image will be. [REWIND: USING REFLECTIONS TO CREATE A DOUBLE EXPOSURE ILLUSION | ART OF THE SECOND SHOT SERIES] Tips and Ideas For starters, it...

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A Guide to Watermarking Your Photos

Posted by on Mar 10, 2016 in Adobe Photoshop, Featured, lightroom, Photography Tips, photoshop

A Guide to Watermarking Your Photos

With so many people sharing photos online every day, we’re becoming more susceptible to copyright infringement and finding our photos in places they really shouldn’t be. The most obvious prevention is to watermark your photos, but this constantly throws up debates with people saying they look ‘ugly’ and that by putting your photos online, you are taking that risk. Does Watermarking Actually Help? Photo editing software is pretty sophisticated nowadays, and it doesn’t take much effort to remove a basic watermark from a photo. So why should you bother? I watermark all of my photos that are online. In fact, there are very few places you’ll be able to find a photo of mine without my logo sitting neatly in the corner. Do my photos still get ‘stolen’? Yes. Copyright infringement is something I come across all the time with my photography. Initially, it really annoyed me; how dare someone exploit my hard work? But now, I have learned to ignore the majority of uses. Besides, they’re often by Chinese or Russian personal websites which I have no hope of communicating with. However, should a commercial entity use my photo, then that would be a different ballgame. They’ll quickly receive an invoice from me for the use and the matter is (most of the time) soon settled. Watermarking definitely isn’t a permanent fix to the issue of copyright infringement. However, it is a deterrent to the casual image ‘thief’. It also provides a way for someone viewing your photo to get back to you as the photographer, should your photo go on a walkabout. In fact, most of the illegitimate uses of my photos are ‘innocent’ and by people who don’t understand copyright. The result is that my watermark stays with my photos even on other websites, and that’s better than nothing. What Should a Watermark Look Like? I always say keep it subtle. A big obtrusive watermark does detract from the photo, and this is the complaint that I hear most of the time. Keeping your watermark in the corner with the opacity set to around 50% or less is a good idea. My watermark is adapted from my logo. This is the original logo: I’m pretty pleased with it – but it definitely is too bold to stick on my photos. Here the adaptation which I place on all of my photos: The most important thing to notice is that it looks professional. Watermarks distract when they’re too bold, but also when they look shabby and as if they were made using Microsoft Paint. It’s worth investing and having a graphics designer make your logo for you. The above two logos were designed at 99designs.com – a great website where you pay around $275 for a variety of designs from multiple designers. You choose the best and that’s what you keep. Bargain! Placement of Your Watermark I...

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